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A PRELIMINARY STUDY ON ESTIMATED GLYCAEMIC INDEX AND MICROSTRUCTURE OF STARCH, IN BOILED CUCURBITA MOSCHATA (SQUASH) FOUND IN SRI LANKA

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There is an increased tendency to use non-pharmacological strategies such as dietary interventions in health related problems. Especially in the case of chronic illnesses, dietary interventions are used along with pharmacological treatment for proper management of patients. Dietary interventions are helpful not only in the management but also in prevention of most of the long term illnesses. In Sri Lanka, squash are commonly consumed as a soup or with major meals usually after traditional cooking. Starchy vegetables with high glycemic index lead to rapidly elevated blood glucose levels, which is associated with risk of obesity and diabetes mellitus. Therefore identification of thermal processing methods that can be used as dietary interventions will help toimprove quality of life. The aim of this study was to evaluate the estimated glycaemic index and microstructure of starch in boiled preparation of squash found in Sri Lanka. Estimated glycaemic index was determined using in vitro digestion procedures. Brightfield florescence microscopy was used to observe the changes in microstructure. The estimated glycaemic index of boiled squash was 13.1 ± 4.1 and microscopy showed a high degree of cell disruption and release of starch out of cells in thermally processed preparation when compared to raw sample. Foods with a low glycaemic index (<55), help slow absorption of carbohydrates and prevent extreme blood glucose fluctuations. Therefore the results of this study conclude that boiled squash is safe for obese and diabetic population. Further studies with other cooking methods will be needed to provide more knowledge. A PRELIMINARY STUDY ON ESTIMATED GLYCAEMIC INDEX AND MICROSTRUCTURE OF STARCH, IN BOILED CUCURBITA MOSCHATA (SQUASH) FOUND IN SRI LANKA. Available from: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/325616463_A_PRELIMINARY_STUDY_ON_ESTIMATED_GLYCAEMIC_INDEX_AND_MICROSTRUCTURE_OF_STARCH_IN_BOILED_CUCURBITA_MOSCHATA_SQUASH_FOUND_IN_SRI_LANKA/stats [accessed Jun 16 2018].
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