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SLES THEORY AND PSYCHOMETRICS DESIGN THEORY AND PSYCHOMETRICS OF THE STRESSFUL LIFE EXPERIENCES SCREENING (SLES)

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Abstract

The Stressful Life Events Screening, or SLES, is a screening that collects information on 20 stressful life events that may precede traumatic stress. There are two versions, the short form that asks if you have experienced the event and the long form which asks participants if they have experienced the event and if they have, it asks participants to estimate how stressful was it at the time of the event and at the time of completing the screening. The screening was used successfully in longitudinal research to track changes in feelings about exposure to an event compared with simply experiencing the event. There is a free manual available, also at ResearchGate.net. The screening is available in English and Spanish.
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... In contrast, this study found that counselors with more ACEs were more likely to experience less CS. This difference may be a result of this study utilizing the ACE Study Questionnaire (Felitti et al., 1998) whereas McKim and Smith-Adcock (2014) used Stamm's (2008) Stressful Life Experiences -Short Form to assess for experiences that may have happened in adulthood or to someone outside of the family. Developmentally, painful childhood experiences may be harder to process, which may in turn produce further-reaching negative outcomes. ...
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