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Donald G. Broadley was one of Africa’s most prolific recent authors. He produced over 410 articles, including numerous comprehensive and detailed taxonomic reviews of lizard and snake genera. A review of his scientific publications spanning over 50 years of herpetological research reveals three phases. The first (1958–1981) saw Don describe his first new reptile and the completion of numerous important generic revisions. The second phase (1982–1991) was a period of relative taxonomic quiescence, but saw the compilation of major faunal overviews, including two books, the monographic Amphibia Zambesiaca (with J.C. Poynton, 1985–1991), and a checklist of the reptiles of Tanzania (with Kim Howell, 1991). The third and final phase of Don’s career (1992–2015) saw him at the peak of both his collaborative and authoritative stage. His outlook embraced sub-Saharan Africa, although always with a bias towards eastern and southern Africa. Appendices include: a detailed bibliography of his herpetological publications; a chronological list of all the scientific taxa he described; and details of the numerous current patronyms named in his honour. He described 123 taxa, including 115 species/subspecies and 8 genera/subgenera. As of 2016 there are 16 patronyms (five amphibians, nine reptiles and two invertebrates) named in his honour.
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... Herp. Fr. (2019) de Donald G. Broadley (1932-2016, puis par celui de Bill Branch (1946-2018, deux herpétologistes spécialistes du sud du continent. Le présent ouvrage traite de l'herpétologie africaine à travers la vie et l'oeuvre de Broadley à qui je souhaite rendre hommage au travers de cette analyse. ...
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