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LIVEJACKET: Wearable Music Experience Device with Multiple Speakers

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... Although loudspeakers are not thought as actuators, they generate vibrations that can convey musical information through the skin as demonstrated in [33,[38][39][40][41]. Frequency response of loudspeakers by far overcome upper tactile perception threshold (e.g., up to 20 kHz), so subwoofers are usually selected for haptic applications. ...
... Consequently, most works described in this section are not necessarily portable at the moment of publication, but have clear opportunities to lately become HMP-WDs. Starting from prototypes that cover a small skin surface, there are bracelets (Figure 4a), designed to be worn on the wrist (see, e.g., in [19,21,59,60]); gloves and mobile device mockups (Figure 4b), designed to be worn or held on the hands (see, e.g., in [37,[61][62][63][64]); belts (Figure 4c), designed to be worn surrounding the body from the chest to the abdomen (see, e.g., in [8,35,41,42]); and jackets ( Figure 4d), designed to be worn on the upper body with actuators usually located on the back, the front and the superior limbs (e.g., [38,65]). Other variations are whole body suits [15], and headphone type displays [39], but instances are scarce. ...
... Although this model ignores the frequency content that defines timbre of instruments, the researchers demonstrated that evaluation of perception was better than that obtained with the FM. The TM offers opportunities for future work as demonstrated by Hashizume et al. [38] who tested the method in a multi-modal experimental setup. Tactile metaphors is another resource that represent an opportunity for timbre rendering but, as mentioned in Section 4.2, this method remains unexplored. ...
Article
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Tactile rendering has been implemented in digital musical instruments (DMIs) to offer the musician haptic feedback that enhances his/her music playing experience. Recently, this implementation has expanded to the development of sensory substitution systems known as haptic music players (HMPs) to give the opportunity of experiencing music through touch to the hearing impaired. These devices may also be conceived as vibrotactile music players to enrich music listening activities. In this review, technology and methods to render musical information by means of vibrotactile stimuli are systematically studied. The methodology used to find out relevant literature is first outlined, and a preliminary classification of musical haptics is proposed. A comparison between different technologies and methods for vibrotactile rendering is performed to later organize the information according to the type of HMP. Limitations and advantages are highlighted to find out opportunities for future research. Likewise, methods for music audio-tactile rendering (ATR) are analyzed and, finally, strategies to compose for the sense of touch are summarized. This review is intended for researchers in the fields of haptics, assistive technologies, music, psychology, and human–computer interaction as well as artists that may make use of it as a reference to develop upcoming research on HMPs and ATR.
... As well as digital applications, there are various conceptual physical products, mostly focusing on haptic features or commands, such as gestures through wearable technologies.Hashizume et al. (2018) developed a wearable music player, LIVEJACKET, that gives vibrations and sound through speakers located in the jacket. The aim is to support music listening experiences through the use of sensorial input. Although it is not a recent example,Nirjon et al. (2012) developed the 'MusicalHeart' application and earphones. By using sensors, ea ...
Thesis
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Music has always been a key element for people to connect with themselves and others. For this study, the main focus is to investigate pre-recorded music playing experiences through time with changing technology and design. As technology develops, many habits and behaviours of people change. Listening to music is an experience that has changed throughout the decades, with regards to technological developments and social contexts. From radio and gramophones to mobile phones and online streaming, the means of listening to music has been through many great changes. Various products and interfaces have been used to organize and deliver recorded music, such as Walkman’s, CD players, and iPods. In this sense, designers have always been involved in presenting the pre-recorded music playing experience to people. As the needs and expectations of users have evolved, so designers’ contributions have also developed, especially in the transition from physical to digital music players. The history of this evolution will be explored in this study, plotting how pre-recorded music playing experiences have changed or remained the same alongside the changes in product design and means of delivering music. A proposal of design and future music playing experiences will be presented at the end of the thesis.
... Another wearable system, the LIVEJACKET, which uses a vest with 22 haptic stimulators attached to the arms and torso has also been developed (Hashizume et al., 2018). Like the haptic suit, the LIVEJACKET presents different musical instruments through different haptic stimulators. ...
Article
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Cochlear implants (CIs) have been remarkably successful at restoring hearing in severely-to-profoundly hearing-impaired individuals. However, users often struggle to deconstruct complex auditory scenes with multiple simultaneous sounds, which can result in reduced music enjoyment and impaired speech understanding in background noise. Hearing aid users often have similar issues, though these are typically less acute. Several recent studies have shown that haptic stimulation can enhance CI listening by giving access to sound features that are poorly transmitted through the electrical CI signal. This "electro-haptic stimulation" improves melody recognition and pitch discrimination, as well as speech-in-noise performance and sound localization. The success of this approach suggests it could also enhance auditory perception in hearing-aid users and other hearing-impaired listeners. This review focuses on the use of haptic stimulation to enhance music perception in hearing-impaired listeners. Music is prevalent throughout everyday life, being critical to media such as film and video games, and often being central to events such as weddings and funerals. It represents the biggest challenge for signal processing, as it is typically an extremely complex acoustic signal, containing multiple simultaneous harmonic and inharmonic sounds. Signal-processing approaches developed for enhancing music perception could therefore have significant utility for other key issues faced by hearing-impaired listeners, such as understanding speech in noisy environments. This review first discusses the limits of music perception in hearing-impaired listeners and the limits of the tactile system. It then discusses the evidence around integration of audio and haptic stimulation in the brain. Next, the features, suitability, and success of current haptic devices for enhancing music perception are reviewed, as well as the signal-processing approaches that could be deployed in future haptic devices. Finally, the cutting-edge technologies that could be exploited for enhancing music perception with haptics are discussed. These include the latest micro motor and driver technology, low-power wireless technology, machine learning, big data, and cloud computing. New approaches for enhancing music perception in hearing-impaired listeners could substantially improve quality of life. Furthermore, effective haptic techniques for providing complex sound information could offer a non-invasive, affordable means for enhancing listening more broadly in hearing-impaired individuals.
... Based on recent developments of vibrotactile technology, which promise to make music more inclusive and immersive [24], this study investigated the effectiveness of a commercially available wearable vibrotactile display in translating musical emotions into vibrations. Our study has shown how profoundly deaf individuals perceive musical emotions through vibrations and has outlined the potential and limitations of such technologies for conveying intended emotions to users. ...
Preprint
Advances in tactile-audio feedback technology have created new possibilities for deaf people to feel music. However, little is known about deaf individuals' perception of musical emotions through vibrotactile feedback. In this paper, we present the findings from a mixed-methods study with 16 profoundly deaf participants. The study protocol was designed to explore how users of a backpack-style vibrotactile display perceive intended emotions in twenty music excerpts. Quantitative analysis demonstrated that participants correctly identified happy and angry excerpts and rated them as more arousing than sad and peaceful excerpts. More positive emotions were experienced during happy compared to angry excerpts while peaceful and sad excerpts were hard to be differentiated. Based on qualitative data, we highlight the benefits and limitations of using vibrations to convey musical emotions to profoundly deaf users. Finally, we provide guidelines for designing accessible music experiences for the deaf community.
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