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Light Saver: Wearable LEDs to Hunt, Reward, Show Off and Equalise

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Light Saver: Wearable LEDs to Hunt, Reward, Show Off and Equalise

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Differences in children's skills and physique can impede their enjoyment of physical games. In this paper, we present a wearable system for playing tag in the dark. We intended the LEDs on players' vests to balance differences in children's abilities by increasing the visibility of more successful players. Initial tests with 64 children suggest that lighting effects may have indirectly produced an ability equalizing effect through prompting in-game communication about cooperation. In our design, very simple lights functioned as a distributed on body scoreboard while simultaneously offering other effects such as providing reward, motivation and illumination. We hope this design may give inspiration to developers concerned with playing balancing and wearable game platforms.
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