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The Body Composition Effects of Extra Protein in Elite Mixed Martial Artists Undergoing Frequent Training Over a Six-Week Period

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The Body Composition Effects of Extra Protein in Elite Mixed Martial Artists Undergoing Frequent Training Over a Six-Week Period

Abstract

Background: The purpose of this prospective open-label pilot trial was to determine if adding whey or rice protein had an effect on body composition in elite mixed martial art athletes undergoing intense training. Methods: 11 healthy men age 28, underwent anthropometric and body composition testing at baseline and week 6. Participants received 75 g/d of whey protein isolate or rice protein isolate. The first 25g were ingested after the first training session daily and the remaining 50g were ingested throughout the day. Along with protein supplementation, subjects engaged in mixed martial arts training twice daily for 6 days each week. Subjects maintained their normal diet. Results: At baseline, the groups had similar body mass, body mass index, percent body fat, fat-free mass, and fat mass. Over the six week period, no significant differences occurred for either the whey (n = 6) or rice group (n = 5) for body mass, % body fat, fat mass, and fat-free mass. Conclusions: There does not appear to be any comparable advantage to body composition when adding 75 g/day (0.92 gm/kg or 0.41 gm/lb of body mass) of either rice or whey protein to the diet of an elite mixed martial artist undergoing intense training for six weeks.
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... Joy et al. [121] reported that 48 g/day of rice or whey protein isolate on training days during an eight-week resistance training program in college-aged adults caused similar improvements in body composition and bench and leg press strength. A study in elite mixed martial artists undergoing six weeks of intense training demonstrated no differences between 75 g/day of whey or rice protein isolate on body composition outcomes [122]. In addition, pea protein supplementation (25 g twice/day) was shown during 12 weeks of resistance training to increase biceps muscle thickness to the same degree as an equivalent amount of whey protein [123]. ...
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