ChapterPDF Available

Abstract

The chapter presents some of the results of the Transmedia Literacy project, funded by H2020 Programme (https://transmedialiteracy.org/). In particular it focuses on how to exploit informal media consumptions and behaviours of teens into educational activities at school, merging formal and informal learning strategies. It also presents the Teacher's Kit, the online platform that allows teachers to find more than 70 educational activities which intertwine media and teens' interests with formal educational goals (http://transmedialiteracy.upf.edu/)
A preview of the PDF is not available

Supplementary resource (1)

... The Transmedia Literacy project, finally, developed a Teacher's kit and an action plan (Amici & Taddeo, 2018) aimed to facilitate teachers to carry out such work, bridging digital practices and informal learning strategies, emerged from the research, to educational activities that can be implemented in classroom. ...
Article
Full-text available
Drawing from theory and research on participatory practices, fan communities and their role in the identity and social work of teenagers, the paper contributes to the debate by analyzing how Italian teenagers take part in a writing-oriented social network such as Wattpad. These practices of authorship and readership have been explored through a mixed method approach, including participatory workshops, interviews and netnography, with a sample of 103 Italian students. Findings show several different ways to approach to digital narration and also different competences connected to such practices, that could be exploited in educational contexts. Different approaches to authorship are thus identified, spanning from an “industry” oriented to an “identity” oriented approach. Also several typologies of social readership emerge, since fans, peers and supporters are different cognitive, emotional and social shapes that teens give to their relation and participation online. The paper aims at describing such models, underlining the deep identity and social work that teens perform through them and offering some suggestions about how to connect it to formal educational contexts. Article open access at the address: http://ijse.padovauniversitypress.it/system/files/papers/%20IJSE-2019-2-15.pdf How to cite it: Taddeo G. (2019). Meanings of Digital Participation into the Narrative Online Communities. Italian Journal of Sociology of Education, 11(2), 331-350. doi: 10.14658/pupj-ijse-2019-2-15
Book
Full-text available
Los participantes compartirán ideas valiosas acerca de rediseñar la educación para promover innovación sustentable y conectarla con personas que están logrando que estos cambios ocurran. Mediante el desarrollo de: 1) un el libro colaborativo impreso, 2) un libro electrónico, y 3) un repositorio de ideas innovadoras en www.aprendizajeinvisible.com, buscamos: • Compartir experiencias y perspectivas innovadoras, orientadas a repensar estrategias y enfoques innovadores para aprender y desaprender continuamente. • Promover el pensamiento crítico frente al papel de la educación formal, informal y no formal en todos los niveles educativos. • Contribuir a la creación de un proceso de aprendizaje sostenible (y continuo) , innovando y diseñando nuevas culturas para una sociedad global. Este proyecto tiene como objetivo facilitar la creación de una comunidad distribuida a nivel mundial de pensadores interesados en la creación de un nuevo futuro para la educación. Innovación sostenible, aprendizaje invisible (aprendizaje informal y no formal) y el desarrollo de habilidades del siglo 21 son algunos de los temas centrales que serán analizados en este proyecto.
Conference Paper
Full-text available
How do young people make sense of their social media experiences, which rhetoric do they use, which grand narratives of technology and social media do they rely on? Based on discourse analysis of approximately 500 pages of written data and 390 minutes of video (generated by 50 college students aged 18-30 between 2014-2016) this article explores how young people negotiate their own experience and existing discourses about social media. Our analysis shows that young people rely heavily on canonic binaries from utopian and dystopian interpretations of networked technologies to apply labels to themselves, others, and social media in general. As they are prompted to reflect on their experience, their rhetoric about social media use and its implications becomes more nuanced yet remains inherently contradictory. This reflects a dialectical struggle to make sense of their lived experiences and feelings. Our unique methodology for generating deeply self-reflexive, auto-ethnographic narrative accounts suggests a way for scholars to be able to understand the ongoing struggles for meaning that occur within the granularity of everyday reflections about our own social media use.
Technical Report
Full-text available
DigComp 2.1 is a further development of the Digital Competence Framework for Citizens. Based on the reference conceptual model published in DigComp 2.0, we present now 8 proficiency levels and examples of use applied to the learning and employment field.
Article
Full-text available
In this paper we investigate photo sharing practices among young people on the ephemeral social media platform Snapchat. What kind of photos are exchanged amongst 12-17 year olds via this app where pictures are elicited after up to 10 seconds? How is the content of the photos perceived by the young people themselves? We employ an Internet-mediated mixed methods approach. The primary empirical material consists of an online survey focusing on photo-elicitation practices on the two platforms Snapchat and Instagram conducted in 2015 and 2016 amongst Danish young people. Our results suggest that Snapchat is a site for intimacy in that pictures of double chins, ugliness and self-exposure are shared. These activities of photo-sharing and photo-communication bind young people in closeness and friendships. In this respect Snapchat differs from, for instance, Instagram where the pictures shared tend to be more polished, neat and perfect. The intimacy shared and maintained on Snapchat does, however, also cover nudes, dickpics and tarnished pictures. In this respect, intimacy entails both the comfort of sharing and the dramas of disruptions. © 2016, Jette Kofoed and Malene Charlotte Larsen. All Rights Reserved.
Book
Full-text available
This report is a synthesis of ongoing research, design, and implementation of an approach to education called “connected learning.” It advocates for broadened access to learning that is socially embedded, interest-driven, and oriented toward educational, economic, or political opportunity. Connected learning is realized when a young person is able to pursue a personal interest or passion with the support of friends and caring adults, and is in turn able to link this learning and interest to academic achievement, career success or civic engagement. This model is based on evidence that the most resilient, adaptive, and effective learning involves individual interest as well as social support to overcome adversity and provide recognition. This report investigates how we can use new media to foster the growth and sustenance of environments that support connected learning in a broad-based and equitable way. This report also offers a design and reform agenda, grounded in a rich understanding of child development and learning, to promote and test connected learning theories.
Article
Full-text available
The article presents results of the media competence of Spanish youth. The methodological tool used, a sociological survey, was created from proposals by more than 50 recognized experts in this field. It is focused on six major dimensions: languages, technologies, interaction processes, production and diffusion processes, aesthetics and ideology and values. The study population is 1,430 youngsters. The results are significant: Spanish youth score poorly in five of the six dimensions, the exception being the technology dimension.
Book
Making offers a series of profound reflections on what it means to create things, on materials and form, the meaning of design, landscape perception, animate life, personal knowledge and the work of the hand. It draws on examples and experiments ranging from prehistoric stone tool-making to the building of medieval cathedrals, from round mounds to monuments, from flying kites to winding string, from drawing to writing. The book will appeal to students and practitioners alike, with interests in social and cultural anthropology, archaeology, architecture, art and design, visual studies and material culture.
Article
The rise in self-publishing, digital folk culture and social media participation, have revolutionized reading and writing practices. Readers can directly contact their favourite authors, and publishers, through social media and become authors, and publishers, themselves. One of the outcomes of digital reading and writing is that writing is now becoming more democratic: traditional publishers are no longer the sole gatekeepers of culture. The popularity of social writing platform Wattpad is a recent example of how a new generation of influential and innovative writers is entering the publishing arena. This also demonstrates that there is a demand for authorship without the intervention from publishers. Despite this, traditional notions of authorship, ownership and control are prevalent in contemporary publishing hindering the true potential of creativity. The disharmony between the rise of the amateur author and the control of the traditional publisher is confronted in the digital public sphere. Consequently, issues such as authority and influence are mediated during the activities and interactions that take place on social media and other online platforms. Established authority figures, such as famous authors or well-known publishers, that exert authority and influence in the traditional sphere, can shift this authority and influence to the digital world; however, this sphere is also occupied by emerging networks of influencers, such as emerging authors or micro-celebrities, who gain popularity as a result of specific trends, in specific domains, at specific times. This article will examine how new and established authors are using social platforms, and social media, to publish their writing, build communities and extend their dialogue with readers and other writers. A netnographic study of Wattpad will identify which authors are the influencers and innovators in social publishing. Consequently, this article will underscore the increasing importance of social networks and social relationships in 21st century publishing.
Book
Schools do not define education, and they are not the only institutions in which learning takes place. After-school programs, music lessons, Scouts, summer camps, on-the-job training, and home activities all offer out-of-school educational experiences. In Learning at Not-School, Julian Sefton-Green explores studies and scholarly research on out-of-school learning, investigating just what it is that is distinctive about the quality of learning in these “not-school” settings. Sefton-Green focuses on those organizations and institutions that have developed parallel to public schooling and have emerged as complements, supplements, or attempts to remediate the alleged failures of schools. He reviews salient principles, landmark studies, and theoretical approaches to learning in not-school environments, reporting on the latest scholarship in the field. He examines studies of creative media production and considers ideas of “learning-to learn”-that relate to analyses of language and technology. And he considers other forms of in-formal learning--in the home and in leisure activities--in terms of not-school experiences. Where possible, he compares the findings of US-based studies with those of non-US-based studies, highlighting core conceptual issues and identifying what we often take for granted. Many not-school organizations and institutions set out to be different from schools, embodying different conceptions of community and educational values. Sefton-Green’s careful consideration of these learning environments in pedagogical terms offers a crucial way to understand how they work.