Conference PaperPDF Available

Calcul trigonométrique du flux solaire reçu par un individu

Authors:
  • Institut National des Sciences Appliquées de Strasbourg

Abstract and Figures

La prise en compte des flux solaires est un paramètre clé de l'estimation du confort dans les espaces ouverts et semi-ouverts. Dans ce travail, on présente les méthodes classiques de détermination du flux direct et diffus sur un individu puis une manière originale de calculer le flux diffus est exposée, basée sur des relations trigonométriques et un calcul intégral simple. Les deux méthodes sont comparées et donnent des résultats similaires. Le modèle proposé prend en compte le caractère anisotrope de la composante circumsolaire du flux diffus dans modèle de Perez. Le phénomène de "rechute zénithale" observé dans la littérature expérimentale et numérique est reproduit par le modèle proposé.
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T
rTr
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r+αfpϕ
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