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Reflections on How Learning in Other Domains Inform Our Approach to Coaching Leadership

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Abstract

As leadership educators with unique and different pasts, we to reflect on nonleadership domains in which we have learned, practiced, and coached. Allen will focus on his experience in springboard diving, Jenkins on his experiences playing and working with jazz musicians, and Buller on his involvement in the military. In each of our experiences, Ericsson and Pool's elements of deliberate practice were present and, in many cases, provided the foundation for our growth and development. There is an opportunity for leadership educators to follow suit and more intentionally design programming that requires deliberate practice.

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The theoretical framework presented in this article explains expert performance as the end result of individuals' prolonged efforts to improve performance while negotiating motivational and external constraints. In most domains of expertise, individuals begin in their childhood a regimen of effortful activities (deliberate practice) designed to optimize improvement. Individual differences, even among elite performers, are closely related to assessed amounts of deliberate practice. Many characteristics once believed to reflect innate talent are actually the result of intense practice extended for a minimum of 10 yrs. Analysis of expert performance provides unique evidence on the potential and limits of extreme environmental adaptation and learning. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
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The theoretical framework presented in this article explains expert performance as the end result of individuals' prolonged efforts to improve performance while negotiating motivational and external constraints. In most domains of expertise, individuals begin in their childhood a regimen of effortful activities (deliberate practice) designed to optimize improvement. Individual differences, even among elite performers, are closely related to assessed amounts of deliberate practice. Many characteristics once believed to reflect innate talent are actually the result of intense practice extended for a minimum of 10 years. Analysis of expert performance provides unique evidence on the potential and limits of extreme environmental adaptation and learning.
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