Chapter

Naturally Occurring Hairlines in Non-balding Oriental Men of East and Southeast Asian Origin

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Abstract

Androgenetic alopecia is the commonest cause of hair loss in men. Hair transplantation in Orientals has been on the rise as more people become aware of the natural result that can be obtained from hair transplantation. The hairline design is one of the most important steps in a successful hair transplantation aimed at restoring the individual hairline. We studied a group of 209 Chinese of East Asian origin and found that the hairline does not recede with age (average height of 6.8 cm) although the density does decrease. There are three common hairline shapes: upslope, straight, and downslope. The temporal angle tends to point posteriorly on the right and inferiorly or posteriorly on the left.

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Chapter
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Hair transplantation in East Asian males
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