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The recorded fauna of the limestone caves of Thailand to April 2018

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Abstract

The 470 species of fauna that have been recorded from limestone caves in Thailand to 7 April 2018 are catalogued. Details of the caves, where a specific taxa has been recorded, are given and geographical errors in the original taxa descriptions are corrected. For the 209 new taxa, where the holotype was collected from a cave, the specimen collection data and repository are listed. A summary table of the fauna is also given.
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... The current report on the fauna in Thai limestone caves (Ellis 2020) contains the remarkable number of 570 species from 590 limestone caves in 42 provinces. For amphibians, Ellis (2020) again lists eight species (families Bufonidae, Ranidae and Microhylidae) and further names 40 reptile species (two Testudines: Geoemydidae, Testudinidae; 38 Squamata: Sauria: one species each of Agamidae and Varanidae, 22 species Gekkonidae, two skinks (Scincidae); Serpentes: one species each of Cylindrophiidae, Elapidae, Viperidae, two species Pythonidae and seven species of Colubridae. is more of a descent than an entrance, because from there the path leads directly downwards, where it continues over a rock tongue into the depths. ...
... At the same time, they show the necessity to continue studying Don Din. The seven species listed by Ellis (2020) have become a total of 19 species as a result of our findings (Tab. 1). ...
... The fact that we did not encounter any geckos during our explorations in the Tham Don Din is astonishing. The genus Cyrtodactylus alone is represented by numerous species in caves (Ellis & Pauwels 2012), and with 22 species, geckos form the strongest group of squamata found in Thai caves (Ellis 2020). Directly on the outside of the rock face and very close to the cave entrance, we were able to detect Cnemaspis biocellata (Fig. 11) in 1985 and a young, unusually coloured Gekko gecko a little further away in 1986 (Fig. 12). ...
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Supplementary information on the fauna of the Don Din karst cave, with notes on the geckofauna of Thale Ban National Park in Satun, southern Thailand. It reports on the animal species found in Don Din Cave in southern Thailand in 1985 and 1986. A list of gecko species found in Thale Ban National Park follows.
... The species is known to roost in limestone caves and forages in (sub) tropical moist forest habitats (Francis 2019, Ellis 2020. It is known to inhabit the lowlands (80m amsl) as the highlands (1,790 m amsl) (Ellis 2020). ...
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