Conference PaperPDF Available

Abstract

Digital food technologies such as diet trackers, food sharing apps, and 'smart' kitchenware offer promising yet debatable food futures. While proponents suggest its potential to prompt efficient food lifestyles, critics highlight the underlying technosolutionism of digital food innovation and limitations related to health safety and data privacy. This workshop addresses both present and near-future digital food controversies and seeks to extend the existing body of Human-Food Interaction (HFI) research. Through scenarios and food-tech prototyping navigated by bespoke Digital Food Cards, we will unpack issues and suggest possible design approaches. We invite proposals from researchers, designers, and other practitioners interested in working towards a complex framework for future HFI research.
Designing Recipes for Digital Food
Futures
Abstract
Digital food technologies such as diet trackers, food
sharing apps, and 'smart' kitchenware offer promising
yet debatable food futures. While proponents suggest
its potential to prompt efficient food lifestyles, critics
highlight the underlying technosolutionism of digital
food innovation and limitations related to health safety
and data privacy. This workshop addresses both
present and near-future digital food controversies and
seeks to extend the existing body of Human-Food
Interaction (HFI) research. Through scenarios and food-
tech prototyping navigated by bespoke Digital Food
Cards, we will unpack issues and suggest possible
design approaches. We invite proposals from
researchers, designers, and other practitioners
interested in working towards a complex framework for
future HFI research.
Author Keywords
human food interaction; digital food cultures; food design;
quantified diets; kitchenware; food sharing
ACM Classification Keywords
H.5.m. Information interfaces and presentation (e.g.,
HCI): Miscellaneous
Paste the appropriate copyright/license statement here. ACM now
supports three different publication options:
ACM copyright: ACM holds the copyright on the work. This is the
historical approach.
License: The author(s) retain copyright, but ACM receives an
exclusive publication license.
Open Access: The author(s) wish to pay for the work to be open
access. The additional fee must be paid to ACM.
This text field is large enough to hold the appropriate release statement
assuming it is single-spaced in Verdana 7 point font. Please do not
change the size of this text box.
Each submission will be assigned a unique DOI string to be included here.
Markéta Dolejšová
National University of Singapore
marketa@u.nus.edu
Rohit Ashok Khot
RMIT University, Melbourne,
Australia
rohit@exertiongameslab.org
Hilary Davis
Swinburne University of
Technology, Melbourne, Australia
hdavis@swin.edu.au
Hasan Shahid Ferdous
University of Melbourne, Australia
hasan.ferdous@unimelb.edu.au
Andrew Quitmeyer
National University of Singapore,
cnmqaj@nus.edu.sg
Introduction
Technology design is increasingly contributing to
people's everyday food lifestyles, which raises many
opportunities and concerns about the future of food
systems. The entanglements of digital technology and
food cultures have brought about various types of
'fruit', ranging from community-driven food sharing
platforms [10,23] to 700$ juicers that can squeeze a
bag of mashed fruit with almost the same efficiency as
a pair of human hands [11]. While claiming that "food
is the new internet" [19] food-tech proponents tend to
portray technology as a means to revolutionize food
systems. On the other hand, critics see such digital
food efforts as a prime example of technological
solutionism - the undue belief that technology design
can fully solve complex societal problems [17,18].
HCI community has addressed the opportunities and
limitations of digital technology in everyday food
practices under the umbrella framework of Human-
Food Interaction (HFI) [1,4,12,13]. For instance,
Dolejšová & Kera [8] show positive impacts of diet
tracking and data sharing services on users' food
literacy but highlight related health safety and data
security risks. Lupton & Turner [16] identified the
potential of 3D food printing kitchenware in user's
playful engagement with personal dietary health, but
also its undue distance from present food cultures and
users' food routines. Scholars have frequently
discussed the positive environmental impacts of digital
technology used for the sharing of home cooked meals,
seasonal harvest, and food leftovers [4,10,23]. The
same food sharing technologies have also been
criticized for contributing to the food market
fragmentation and for their limited affordances
regarding public health safety [23]. Opportunities and
limitations of digital systems (e.g., open maps, drones,
mobile apps, IoT sensors) in promoting sustainable
behavior have been explored in the context of wild food
practices such as foraging, dumpster diving, and food
growing [2,6,7,15]. Interactive digital technology was
shown to have positive impacts on commensality
experiences at a family dinner table [9], while at the
same time reinforcing intergenerational gaps regarding
digital literacy [3]. Kuznetsov et al. [15] suggested a
potential use of digital technology in advancing at-
home food science activities such as DIY food
fermentation. In contrast, Dolejšová & Kera [7] saw
only a peripheral interest of fermentation enthusiasts in
using 'hacked' digital gadgets for their DIY food
experiments. Although still in its infancy, and without
providing firm conclusions, the emerging body of HFI
research outlines digital food issues and concerns such
as these, and invites further interdisciplinary research.
Motivation and Goals
This workshop seeks to extend the existing body of HFI
research by addressing personal, social, environmental,
and policy implications of digital technologies used in
everyday food practices. More specifically, our focus is
on a technology used for:
food making (e.g., 'smart' kitchenware
[12,13,16]; AI-based and digitally augmented
cookbooks [5,20])
diet planning (e.g., diet tracking devices and
personalized nutrition services [8,21])
food sharing (e.g., digital food sharing
platforms, open mapping and ubicomp systems
[4,7,10,23])
dining (e.g., social dining services and
intergenerational interaction at the dinner table
[5,9])
food play (e.g., celebratory technology [9,12],
food-based games [1])
We will approach these digital food practices as a
contested area navigated by multiple stakeholders from
corporate and governmental, as well as private and
NGO sectors. We are also interested in digital food
practices originating from personal interaction between
co-located and dispersed parties such as families,
friends, neighbors and co-workers. Our aim is to
critically unpack issues surrounding digital food
technologies and address questions such as: What are
the advantages and challenges that digital food
technology brings into users' everyday life? How can we
design to scaffold the development of playful but also
sustainable and just digital food cultures? What issues
are faced in contemporary HFI research and how could
we address them in the future?
Building on our inaugural SIG CHI meeting at CHI 2017
[13] and subsequent FoodCHI symposium [14], our
broad aim is to help nurture the existing research into
everyday digital food cultures and develop a strong
community of HFI scholars. Our workshop contributes
to the nascent HFI research and related HCI inquiries
into data-driven health and 'green' lifestyles. We invite
interdisciplinary contributions from researchers,
designers, food scientists and other practitioners
interested in working towards a complex framework for
future HFI research. The organizers themselves have
very diverse practical and theoretical experiences with
the above areas of digital food practices, which will help
guide the workshop activities and also drive the
participants' selection process.
Workshop Themes
The workshop themes reflect on implications of digital
technology utilized for everyday food practices and
outline related design challenges. The themes cover
(but are not limited to) the following areas:
1. Personal implications
What are the impacts of digital technology on user's
food-related literacy? How is digital technology utilized
in health and diet self-experimentation? How does
technology affect user's emotional relationship with
food and eating? How can we design to best support
the food-related health and wellbeing of individuals and
communities?
2. Social and cultural implications
What changes does technology provide to user's social
life and commensality experiences? How does
technology affect traditional food practices and culinary
techniques? How can we include traditional food
knowledge (e.g., fermentation practices) to embrace
culturally robust digital food designs? What are the best
methods for co-designing technology, which reflects
community needs while embracing individual diversity?
3. Policy implications
What kind of data is produced and shared via digital
food technology, by whom, and for what ends? Which
stakeholders are involved and who is excluded from
digital food practices? What are the existing and
potential uses of digital technology for food activism?
How can design support safe exchanges of personal
food-related data?
4. Environmental implications
To what extent can digital technology support
sustainable food practices? What are the opportunities
of digital technology in advancing user's environmental
consciousness? How can we design for playful, but also
critical user engagement with sustainable food
practices?
Pre-Workshop Plans
We will ask the potential participants to submit a 2-
page position paper in CHI EA format, directly or
indirectly addressing the workshop themes. Participants
will also be encouraged to bring a working prototype of
their digital food designs, if possible. All accepted
papers will be placed on the workshop website
(http://datamaterialities.org/chi2018workshop.html)
along with other works related to workshop themes. We
will promote the workshop through personal
connections, social media, HCI mailing lists, the
workshop website, and other relevant channels. We
expect to host up to 20 participants.
Workshop Structure And Activities
This full-day workshop will involve a mix of
presentations of participants' HFI research followed by
group discussions and playful prototyping of various
food-tech designs and scenarios. The workshop is
broken into six main sessions:
Session 1 (9am-9:15): We will start by introducing
the workshop themes and agenda for the day.
Session 2 (9:15-11:15): Participants will give short
five minutes presentations of their proposals, followed
by a group discussion on their perspectives on the
crossing of food and technology.
Session 3 (11:15 - 12pm): Presentations will be
followed by a three-minute speed-date session, in
which all participants will talk to each other in pairs,
giving them the opportunity not only to get to know
each other but also to discuss the topics raised in their
presentations.
Session 4 (12-1pm): Following on from the speed
dating, we will have lunch involving various playful,
participatory activities around food. Workshop
participants will engage in playful interaction with
playful food and technology props brought by
organizers. The idea behind this activity is to prompt
discussions by taking inspiration from mundane food
activities and shared mealtimes.
Session 5 (1-4pm): Post lunch, we will continue with
small-group activities comprising of scenarios and
hands-on prototyping that will be navigated by specially
designed Digital Food Cards.1
The card deck outlines 23 existing as well as
anticipated speculative food-tech practices ranging
from Urban Foraging, Gut Gardening and Food
Gadgeteering to more radical envisionments of food
routines adopted by Turing Foodies, Drone Hunters and
DNA Diet Fatalists. Instead of suggesting any answers
or solutions, the cards raise questions and provoke the
players to speculate: What changes does digital
technology afford to our everyday food experiences?
What opportunities and frictions would technology pose
to future food lifestyles? What are the present and
near-future Datavore's dilemmas? Would Turing
Foodies trust each other? Would Gut Gardener date a
Food Psychonaut? Where would a Food NeoPunker and
Foodcaster go for a Friday night dinner?
Inspired by a similar card technique used by Vines et
al. [22] we hope this ambiguity will provoke playful
participant engagement as well as critical reasoning
about existing and near-future digital food lifestyles.
Participants working in groups will map selected cards
on the four main workshop themes and discuss related
opportunities and limitations. Each group will be invited
to create scenarios addressing the outlined issues and
1 http://materie.me/digifood
design 'digital food prototypes' to embody the scenarios
in actual (or even edible) form. Food and technology
materials for prototyping will be provided by workshop
organizers; participants will be invited to bring
prototypes and demos of their own digital food designs.
Session 6 (4-6pm): We will ask every group to
showcase their prototypes and scenarios and outline
the design approaches that they have taken. The
workshop will be wrapped-up by summarizing
preliminary results related to the discussed issues and
ideas.
Figure 1: Digital Food Cards
Figure 2: Digital Food Cards
Post-Workshop Plans
All accepted submissions would be included in the
dedicated workshop proceedings, published as a
technical report and placed on the workshop’s website.
The website will summarize outcomes of the workshop
and provide a space for ongoing discussion and sharing
of resources even after the workshop concludes. This
will comprise of scenarios, prototypes, and other media
content created during the workshop to be archived on
the website. To document and share the workshop
activities in near-real-time, we will use standard social
media tools (Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, etc.). The
workshop outcomes will be further disseminated among
wider audience via a CHI poster presentation. We will
also invite selected participants to contribute towards a
special issue on digital food cultures in TOCHI or IJHCS.
Organizers
Markéta Dolejšová (the primary contact person for
this workshop) is a Ph.D. candidate at the National
University of Singapore focusing on socio-technical
contexts of digital food lifestyles. Her practice-based
research refers to Speculative and Critical Design
methodologies that she extends into participatory
public engagement events (http://materie.me).
Rohit Ashok Khot is a VC Postdoctoral fellow in the
Exertion Games Lab at RMIT University. Rohit
investigates new playful ways of enriching our
interactions and association with data using
technologies like food printing
(http://datamaterialities.org).
Hilary Davis is a Senior Research Fellow at the Centre
for Social Impact, Swinburne University of Technology.
Her work investigates the role digital technologies play
in people’s work, social activities and home lives. She is
interested in how digital cookbooks, and digital
technologies generally, might impact on
intergenerational familial relationships at mealtimes
(http://hilaryjdavis.com/).
Hasan Shahid Ferdous is a research fellow in the
Microsoft Research Centre for Social Natural User
Interface at University of Melbourne, Australia. His
current research focuses on dining experiences and the
sociality and interaction among the family members in
the shared family space (http://www.hsferdous.com/).
Andrew Quitmeyer is a Professor at the National
University of Singapore. He researches ways to design
digital media in natural environments. He is also a
proponent of exploring novel food technologies
including digitally enhanced foods and new forms of
entomophagy.
Call For Participation
Technology design is increasingly contributing to
people's everyday food lifestyles and offers promising
yet debatable food futures. Diet-tracking devices, food
sharing apps, 'smart' kitchenware and other food-tech
create both opportunities and risks related to users
health, food literacy, and social life. This workshop
addresses present and near-future digital food
controversies and seeks to extend the body of Human-
Food Interaction (HFI) research. We invite researchers
interested in HFI issues to submit position papers
reflecting on food-tech implications in following areas:
1. Personal implications
What are the impacts of digital technology on user's
food-related literacy? How can we design to support
individual’s health and well being?
2. Social and cultural implications
What changes does technology provide to user's social
life and commensality experiences? How can we design
to reflect community needs while embracing individual
diversity?
3. Policy implications
What kind of data is produced and shared via digital
food technology, by whom, and for what ends? How
can design support safe exchanges of personal food-
related data?
4. Environmental implications
To what extent can digital technology support
sustainable food practices? How can we design for
playful, but also critical user engagement with
sustainable food practices?
More info:
http://datamaterialities.org/chi2018workshop.html
Proposals (max 2p in CHI EA sent to
info[at]datamaterialities.org) will be selected based on
originality and relevance to workshop themes. The
workshop activities will comprise of scenarios and food-
tech prototyping navigated by bespoke Digital Food
Cards. Accepted participants will be asked to contribute
towards a special issue on digital food in TOCHI or
IJHCS. At least one author of each accepted paper must
attend the workshop.
References
1. Peter Arnold. 2017. You Better Eat to Survive!
Exploring Edible Interactions in a Virtual Reality
Game. In Proceedings of the 2017 CHI Conference
Extended Abstracts on Human Factors in
Computing Systems, ACM
2. Alan Chamberlain and Chloe Griffiths, 2013. Wild
food practices: understanding the wider
implications for design and HCI. In Proceedings of
the 2013 ACM conference on Pervasive and
ubiquitous computing ACM, 575-584
3. Pepukayi Chitakunye and Amandeep Takhar. 2014.
Consuming family quality time: the role of
technological devices at mealtimes. British Food
Journal 116, 7, 1162-1179.
4. Rob Comber, Jaz Hee-Jeong Choi, Jettie Hoonhout,
and Kenton O'hara. 2014. Designing for human
food interaction: An introduction to the special
issue on 'food and interaction design'. International
Journal of Human-Computer Studies 72, 2
(2014/02/01/), 181-184.
5. Hilary Davis, Bjorn Nansen, Frank Vetere, Toni
Robertson, Margot Brereton, Jeannette Durick, and
Kate Vaisutis. 2014. Homemade cookbooks: a
recipe for sharing. In Proceedings of the 2014
conference on Designing interactive systems ACM,
73-82
6. Carl Disalvo and Tom Jenkins. 2015. Drones for
Foraging. In 2nd Conference on Research Though
Design.
7. Markéta Dolejšová and Denisa Kera. 2016. The
Fermentation GutHub Project and the Internet of
Microbes. Enriching Urban Spaces with Ambient
Computing, the Internet of Things, and Smart City
Design. Ed by Konomi, Shin'ichi, Roussos, George.
IGI Global
8. Markéta Dolejšová and Denisa Kera. 2017. Soylent
Diet Self-Experimentation: Design Challenges in
Extreme Citizen Science Projects. In Proceedings of
the 2017 ACM Conference on Computer Supported
Cooperative Work and Social Computing ACM,
2112-2123
9. Hasan Shahid Ferdous, Frank Vetere, Hilary Davis,
Bernd Ploderer, Kenton O'hara, Rob Comber, and
Geremy Farr-Wharton. 2017. Celebratory
Technology to Orchestrate the Sharing of Devices
and Stories during Family Mealtimes. In
Proceedings of the 2017 CHI Conference on Human
Factors in Computing Systems ACM, 6960-6972
10. Eva Ganglbauer, Geraldine Fitzpatrick, Özge
Subasi, and Florian Güldenpfennig. 2014. Think
globally, act locally: a case study of a free food
sharing community and social networking. In
Proceedings of the 17th ACM conference on
Computer supported cooperative work & social
computing ACM, 911-921
11. Gelles, David. 2017. Juicero, Start-Up With a $700
Juicer and Top Investors, Shuts Down. New York
Times. Retrieved October 12, 2017 from
http://www.nytimes.com/2017/09/01/technology/j
uicero-start-up-shuts-down.html
12. Rohit Ashok Khot, Deepti Aggarwal, Ryan Pennings,
Larissa Hjorth, and Florian 'Floyd' Mueller. 2017.
EdiPulse: Investigating a Playful Approach to Self-
monitoring through 3D Printed Chocolate Treats. In
Proceedings of the 2017 CHI Conference on Human
Factors in Computing Systems ACM, 6593-6607
13. Rohit Ashok Khot, Deborah Lupton, Markéta
Dolejšová, and Florian 'Floyd' Mueller. 2017. Future
of Food in the Digital Realm. In Proceedings of the
2017 CHI Conference Extended Abstracts on
Human Factors in Computing Systems ACM, 1342-
1345
14. Rohit Ashik Khot and Jaz Hee-Jeong. 2017. 2nd
FoodCHI symposium. Retrieved October 12, 2017
from http://datamaterialities.org/foodchi.html.
15. Stacey Kuznetsov, Christina J. Santana, Elenore
Long, Rob Comber, and Carl Disalvo, 2016. The Art
of Everyday Food Science: Foraging for Design
Opportunities. In Proceedings of the Proceedings of
the 2016 CHI Conference Extended Abstracts on
Human Factors in Computing Systems ACM, 3516-
3523
16. Deborah Lupton and Bethaney Turner. 2016. 'Both
Fascinating and Disturbing': Consumer Responses
to 3D Food Printing and Implications for Food
Activism. Digital Food Activism. London: Routledge
17. Christopher Miles and Nancy Smith. 2015. What
Grows in Silicon Valley. The Ecopolitics of
Consumption: The Food Trade 119.
18. Evgeny Morozov. 2013. To Save Everything Click
Here: Technology, Solutionism and the Urge to Fix
Problems That Don’t Exist. Allen Lane Penguin
Books.
19. Kimbal Musk. (2016-2017). Food is the New
Internet. Medium Channel. Retrieved October 12,
2017 from http://medium.com/food-is-the-new-
internet
20. Amaia Salvador, Nicholas Hynes, Yusuf Aytar,
Javier Marin, Ferda Ofli, Ingmar Weber, and
Antonio Torralba, 2017. Learning Cross-modal
Embeddings for Cooking Recipes and Food Images.
Training 720, 619,508.
21. Marc Tuters & Denisa Kera. Hungry for Data:
Metabolic Interaction from Farm to Fork to
Phenotype. Eat, Cook, Grow: Mixing Human-
Computer Interactions with Human-Food
Interactions, (2014), 243.
22. John Vines, Mark Blythe, Stephen Lindsay, Paul
Dunphy, Andrew Monk, and Patrick Olivier. 2012.
Questionable concepts: critique as resource for
designing with eighty somethings. In Proceedings
of the SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in
Computing Systems ACM, 1169-1178.
23. Karolina Zurek. 2016. Food Sharing in Europe:
Between Regulating Risks and the Risks of
Regulating. European Journal of Risk Regulation 7,
4, 675-687.
... Human-food interaction researchers have already collected prior work in workshops [13,14,16,22,28,39], resulting in an online summary of existing research [7]. There are also emergent communities, for example, the FoodCHI Special Interest Group [26], the SIGCHI foodCHI network, and the ACM Future of Computing Academy working group on Computing and Food [38], and the Feeding Food Futures (FFF) network [2]. ...
... Several of the workshop organizers have been previously involved in conducting such workshops. For example, there was a workshop on "designing recipes for digital food cultures" [22] at CHI'18 that focused on recipes as part of human-food interactions. At CHI'17, there was a workshop called "digital health & self-experimentation [21] that explored, amongst other topics, how to support health through food tracking. ...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
There is an increasing interest in food within the HCI discipline, with many interactive prototypes emerging that augment, extend and challenge the various ways people engage with food, ranging from growing plants, cooking ingredients, serving dishes and eating together. Grounding theory is also emerging that in particular draws from embodied interactions, highlighting the need to consider not only instrumental, but also experiential factors specific to human-food interactions. Considering this, we are provided with an opportunity to extend human-food interactions through knowledge gained from designing novel systems emerging through technical advances. This workshop aims to explore the possibility of bringing practitioners, researchers and theorists together to discuss the future of human-food interaction with a particular highlight on the design of experiential aspects of human-food interactions beyond the instrumental. This workshop extends prior community building efforts in this area and hence explicitly invites submissions concerning the empirically-informed knowledge of how technologies can enrich eating experiences. In doing so, people will benefit not only from new technologies around food, but also incorporate the many rich benefits that are associated with eating, especially when eating with others.
... Building on this work, in this literature review, we want to point to three observations and opportunities for more radical HFI work that wants to contribute to food system transformation. First, while there are exceptions [23,29,31,41,66], design interventions most commonly focus on specific domains of the food system (e.g. eating or food waste), de-emphasising the interdependencies of domains and practices across the system. ...
... [27,41]) and workshops at international conferences such as CHI (e.g. [29,66]) or DIS (e.g. [23,31]). ...
Article
Full-text available
Our food system is a socio-material, heterogeneous infrastructure whose complexity and interconnectedness often remains invisible to citizens. While moments of crisis expose the vulnerabilities and injustices underlying this system, this paper seeks to explore which processes and tools CSCW could purposely design to 'open up' food infrastructures and bring young and adult people in contact with different aspects of the food system to cultivate food citizenship from a more-than-human perspective. Through a collaboration with a local primary school and four different food organisations (a mushroom grower, a vegetable farm, a bread-baking community centre, and a food bank) in North East England, UK, we designed 'contact zones' that enabled a class of students aged 7 to 8 years to encounter socio-material food practices at each partnering organisation's site and in the classroom. Our insights show young people's rich engagement in the socio-materiality of place, food, and practices; how encountering food practices across very different sites helped surface the interconnectedness of the food system; and how the contact zones opened spaces to practice food citizenship. The paper offers design implications towards infrastructuring more-than-human food pedagogies. It discusses inherent power dynamics of more-than-human design collaborations, critically evaluates the role of technology in more-than-human relations, and presents three design opportunities towards a relational understanding of food.
... In this paper, we focus on four food-oriented workshops held at DIS, CHI Play, and CHI [6][10] [13] [34]. We unpack diverse roles that experimental design co-creation, performed with and around food, can play in supporting critical, interdisciplinary HFI inquiry. ...
... Technology is never neutral and its impacts depend on distinct, existing or envisioned, contexts of implementation and use. Many food-tech designs are presented by their inventors as universal solutions to food problems that are accessible at the push of a button [3][10] [13]. Against such misguided techno-solutionism, an important role for HFI is to support diverse, critical perspectives and technology designs that afford open creative food exploration and playful learning. ...
Conference Paper
Digital technology has become a frequent companion of daily food practices, shaping the ways we produce, consume, and interact with food. Smart kitchenware, diet tracking apps, and other techno-solutions carry promise for healthy and sustainable food futures but are often problematic in their impact on food cultures. We conducted four Human-Food Interaction (HFI) workshops to reflect on and anticipate food-tech issues, using experimental food design co-creation as our primary method. At the workshops, food and food practices served as the central research theme and accessible starting point to engage stakeholders and explore values, desires, and imaginaries associated with food-tech. Drawing on these explorations, we discuss diverse roles that experimental design cocreation, performed with and around food, can play in supporting critical, interdisciplinary HFI inquiries. Our findings will appeal to design researchers interested in food as a research theme or as a tangible (and compostable!) design material affording diverse co-creative engagements.
... Food has been noted for its pervasive nature in the domestic environment [17], making it into a topic that members of the public are generally able to relate to and reflect upon in user studies, such as those featuring envisioning and other forms of speculative design [23]. Examples of technologies in this vein that have been elaborated by previous research include automatic drone deliveries [53], recipe recommending systems [25], domestic food service robots [22] or diet personalization services [24]. ...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
UbiComp has been envisioned to bring about a future dominated by calm computing technologies making our everyday lives ever more convenient. Yet the same vision has also attracted criticism for encouraging a solitary and passive lifestyle. The aim of this paper is to explore and elaborate these tensions further by examining the human values surrounding future domestic UbiComp solutions. Drawing on envisioning and contravisioning, we probe members of the public (N=28) through the presentation and focus group discussion of two contrasting animated video scenarios, where one is inspired by 'calm' and the other by 'engaging' visions of future UbiComp technology. By analysing the reasoning of our participants, we identify and elaborate a number of relevant values involved in balancing the two perspectives. In conclusion, we articulate practically applicable takeaways in the form of a set of key design questions and challenges.
... Food has been noted for its pervasive nature in the domestic environment [17], making it into a topic that members of the public are generally able to relate to and reflect upon in user studies, such as those featuring envisioning and other forms of speculative design [23]. Examples of technologies in this vein that have been elaborated by previous research include automatic drone deliveries [53], recipe recommending systems [25], domestic food service robots [22] or diet personalization services [24]. ...
Preprint
Full-text available
UbiComp has been envisioned to bring about a future dominated by calm computing technologies making our everyday lives ever more convenient. Yet the same vision has also attracted criticism for encouraging a solitary and passive lifestyle. The aim of this paper is to explore and elaborate these tensions further by examining the human values surrounding future domestic UbiComp solutions. Drawing on envisioning and contravisioning, we probe members of the public (N=28) through the presentation and focus group discussion of two contrasting animated video scenarios, where one is inspired by "calm" and the other by "engaging" visions of future UbiComp technology. By analysing the reasoning of our participants, we identify and elaborate a number of relevant values involved in balancing the two perspectives. In conclusion, we articulate practically applicable takeaways in the form of a set of key design questions and challenges.
... Human-food automation is emerging topic in academic food research, and there has been a growing interest among scholars in debating the opportunities and risks that digital technology presents to contemporary food cultures (Comber et al., 2014;Dolejšová et al., 2018;Lupton, 2018). My aim in this chapter is to extend these food-tech reflections with insights from my long-term ethnographic study of the Complete Foods diet -a quantified powdered meal replacement originating from the Silicon Valley realm. ...
Chapter
Full-text available
From cooking, shopping, and growing to dining and dieting, digital technology has become a frequent companion of our day-to-day food practices. The diversity of products and services available on the food-tech market is broad, ranging from smart kitchenware to diet tracking apps and ‘biohacked’ food products. Investments in food-technology innovation are led by the corporate sector of Silicon Valley ‘foodpreneurs’ who started designing solutions for everyday food problems as well as complex food system issues. These food-tech solutions present opportunities for efficient food practices but also challenges to existing sociocultural frameworks of food production and consumption. In this chapter, I illustrate such contradictions through the example of Complete Foods — a powder-based food replacement originating from the Silicon Valley startup realm that enables quantified data-driven control over one’s diet. I discuss my three-year ethnographic study of the Complete Foods community and outline the risks and opportunities that the diet presents to day-to-day lives of its members. I frame my findings within the Silicon Valley food-tech innovation context.
... game designers) and gastronomy (e.g. chefs), and will contact participants of previous HFI workshops [6,7,13,19]. We expect to host up to 15 participants. ...
Conference Paper
We propose a Situated Play Design (SPD) workshop aimed at exploring how culture and traditions can guide playful design. Using food as an accessible starting point, we invite scholars from diverse communities to share, analyze, and make creative use of playful traditions, and prototype new and interesting eating experiences. Through hands-on engagement with traditions, play and technology, we will discuss strategies to make designerly use of forms of play that are embedded in culture. The outcomes of the workshop will be twofold: First, in response to recent calls for increasingly situated and emergent play design methods, we explore strategies to chase culturally-grounded play. Second, we produce an annotated portfolio of "play potentials" to inspire the design of future food-related technologies. The workshop will contribute to enriching the set of tools available for designers interested in play and technologies for everyday-use, in and beyond the food domain.
... We also identified three growing communities within HFI. The Food CHI community originated in 2017 as a SIG [36] and was maintained in 2018 as a conference workshop [26]. It extends previous attempts at community-making around food and interaction design (e.g. ...
Conference Paper
Activity in Human-Food Interaction (HFI) research is sky-rocketing across a broad range of disciplinary interests and concerns. The dynamic and heterogeneous nature of this emerging field presents a challenge to scholars wishing to critically engage with prior work, identify gaps and ensure impact. It also challenges the formation of community. We present a Systematic Mapping Study of HFI research and an online data visualisation tool developed to respond to these issues. The tool allows researchers to engage in new ways with the HFI literature, propose modifications and additions to the review, and thereby actively engage in community-making. Our contribution is threefold: (1) we characterize the state of HFI, reporting trends, challenges and opportunities; (2) we provide a taxonomy and tool for diffractive reading of the literature; and (3) we offer our approach for adaptation by research fields facing similar challenges, positing value of the tool and approach beyond HFI. CCS CONCEPTS • Human-centered computing → HCI theory, concepts and models. * Altarriba Bertran and Wilde are co-first authors.
Article
Today’s modern societies are increasingly dependent on digital technologies and the software underpinning these technologies in almost every sphere of professional and personal life. These technologies and software are poorly understood as tools that shape our engagement with knowledge, culture and society in the 21st century. None of these tools are ‘neutral.’ They embody social and cultural assumptions about their use and all have particular values embedded in their interfaces and affordances. This paper draws from a funded research project investigating the notion of software literacy (Khoo, Hight, Torrens, & Cowie, 2017). In the project software literacy is defined as the expertise involved in understanding, applying, problem solving and critiquing software when it is used to achieve particular goals. The project team hypothesised there exists three progressive tiers of development towards software literacy in professional contexts. We conducted case studies of engineering and media studies students’ learning of an ubiquitous software such as PowerPoint as well as proprietary discipline-specific software to examine how software literacy is understood, developed and applied in a tertiary teaching-learning context. In this contribution we outline the project findings then use the notion of software literacy as the lens to unpack and illustrate through three everyday examples how software literacy would seem to be an essential part of learning and living in the 21st century.
Conference Paper
Full-text available
In recent years, Human Food Interaction (HFI) as a field of research has gained currency within HCI with a focus on how we grow, shop, cook and eat food using digital technologies. Advances in food printing technologies add an extra dimension to these established practices. Research is needed to understand how food printing technologies may affect our practices and relationship with food. This SIG meeting is structured to give HCI researchers an overview of current food printing practices and to discuss grand challenges associated with digital food. Our aims are to develop a stronger community surrounding digital food technology and Human Food Interaction (HFI) and help to move these fields forward via timely discussion and the sharing of successes and challenges. Participants will also engage in playful activities around food and will have an opportunity to create and taste 3D printed chocolates, helping them learn and debate the opportunities that exist with digitally printed food.
Chapter
Full-text available
The Fermentation GutHub is a local community of fermentation enthusiasts in Singapore formed around 'smart' human-microbial interactions. The project is a critique of the common IoT utopia claiming efficient and transparent interactions between citizens and various stakeholders using smart sensors and monitoring devices in the cities of the future. Instead of relying on technology produced and supported by corporate actors or large government plans, the GutHub scenario uses existing fermentation groups and DIY tools as a model for designing resilient and symbiotic urban communities. Against the utopia of evidence-based decision making driven by policy and corporate actors, it emphasizes the importance of collective experience with risk and opportunities negotiated on a grassroots level. The project supports citizens' exchanges of various cultures, fermentation practices, and sometimes dangerous but also beneficial experiments with our guts as an interface, and proposes a model for messier IoT scenarios of future cities.
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Quantified self-experimentation with personal diets is a popular activity among health enthusiasts, diagnosed patients, as well as "life hackers" pursuing self-optimization goals. In this paper, we reflect on self-experimentation practices in the context of amateur citizen science communities. We report findings from 11 month-long qualitative fieldwork in a community of nutrition hobbyists experimenting with a powdered food substitute "soylent". Our respondents customized the soylent powders to their personal needs, tracked their metabolic reactions to the diet, and discussed their findings with the online soylent user community. Although the data and knowledge sharing within the community positively impacted respondents' nutrition literacy, these activities created risks regarding their health safety and data privacy. We define soylent self-experimentation as a form of "extreme citizen science". Based on the limitations identified in the soylent community, we suggest a set of design recommendations for extreme citizen science projects.
Article
In this paper, we introduce Recipe1M+, a new large-scale, structured corpus of over one million cooking recipes and 13 million food images. As the largest publicly available collection of recipe data, Recipe1M+ affords the ability to train high-capacity models on aligned, multi-modal data. Using these data, we train a neural network to learn a joint embedding of recipes and images that yields impressive results on an image-recipe retrieval task. Moreover, we demonstrate that regularization via the addition of a high-level classification objective both improves retrieval performance to rival that of humans and enables semantic vector arithmetic. We postulate that these embeddings will provide a basis for further exploration of the Recipe1M+ dataset and food and cooking in general. Code, data and models are publicly available.
Conference Paper
While the idea of "celebratory technologies" during family mealtimes to support positive interactions at the dinner table is promising, there are few studies that investigate how these technologies can be meaningfully integrated into family practices. This paper presents the deployment of Chorus - a mealtime technology that orchestrates the sharing of personal devices and stories during family mealtimes, explores related content from all participants' devices, and supports revisiting previously shared content. A three-week field deployment with seven families shows that Chorus augments family interactions through sharing contents of personal and familial significance, supports togetherness and in-depth discussion by combining resources from multiple devices, helps to broach sensitive topics into familial conversation, and encourages participation from all family members including children. We discuss implications of this research and reflect on design choices and opportunities that can further enhance the family mealtime experience.
Conference Paper
Self-monitoring offers benefits in facilitating awareness about physical exercise, but such data-centric activity may not always lead to an enjoyable experience. We introduce EdiPulse a novel system that creates activity treats to offer playful reflections on everyday physical activity through the appealing medium of chocolate. EdiPulse translates self-monitored data from physical activity into small 3D printed chocolate treats. These treats (
Conference Paper
"You Better Eat to Survive!" is a two-player virtual reality game that involves eating real food to survive and ultimately escape from a virtual island. Eating is sensed through capturing chewing sounds via a low-cost microphone solution. Unlike most VR games that stimulate mostly our visual and auditory senses, "You Better Eat to Survive!" makes a novel contribution by integrating the gustatory sense not just as an additional game input, but as an integral element to the game experience: we use the fact that with head-mounted displays, players cannot see what they are eating and have to entrust a second player outside the VR experience to provide them with sufficient food and feeding him/her. With "You Better Eat to Survive!", we aim to demonstrate that eating can be an intriguing interaction technique to enrich virtual reality experiences while offering complementary benefits of social interactions around food.
Article
Underground kitchens, public fridges and local meals at strangers’ homes offer an interesting and economically attractive alternatives to traditional channels of food distribution. The new practices of food sharing facilitated by technological development and using new social media combine an interest in modern engaged consumerism with a promise of more sustainable food chains and waste reduction. The main objective of this article is to map and analyse the risks and regulatory challenges posed by the variety of emerging sharing economy practices in the food sector. Drawing on the identification of the key features of sharing economy and the specificity of food in that context, this article discusses various forms, scales and motivations behind the existing food sharing initiatives. The article describes three main categories of food sharing models, namely harvest sharing, meal sharing and leftover sharing, and illustrates them with concrete examples of networks or platforms. Against this background, the article scrutinizes the major risks and challenges of food sharing, ranging from individual and public health and safety to market fragmentation. Reviewing the available regulatory options to address these risks, and juxtaposing them with the risks stemming out of regulatory intervention as such, the contribution calls for balanced approach to food sharing governance in the European Union.
Conference Paper
This workshop will examine everyday food science practices such as fermenting, brewing, or pickling edible materials, as well as foraging, bartering, or dumpster diving for food. We hope to gather a diverse group of HCI researchers, food practitioners, artists, and scientists to engage with these practices as deliberate alternatives to top-down production of both food and knowledge. Hands-on activities with food, as well as critical reflection and design exercise will envision new systems for food preservation and security, human health and nutrition, and everyday scientific literacy.