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... In this study, Pieridae is represented by two subfamilies, Coliadinae (S = 7) and Pierinae (S = 2). In Brazil Pieridae is one of the most widely distributed families, despite the low number of species (Iserhard et al., 2017), with most of these taxa found in modified habitats with a high degree of anthropization (Zacca et al., 2011;Morais et al., 2012;Martins et al., 2017). ...
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The deforestation of areas due to the expansion of cities and urban zones have directly affected natural habitats, causing negative changes, biodiversity loss and reducing populations size of native flora and fauna. In this context, butterflies are considered excellent organisms for monitoring environmental quality as they are involved in extremely specific ecological relationships with their habitats. Thus, this research aimed to carry out a survey of the butterfly (Lepidoptera: Papilionoidea) fauna in the Arboretum of Alagoas State. Weekly samplings were carried out from September 2019 to March 2020. During 140 sampling hours, 415 individuals were collected, being observed the occurrence of 44 species distributed in six families. The low number of recorded taxa reflects an expected poor richness as, in general, the closer the analyzed fragment is to an urban area, the smaller the number of species. Nymphalidae was the most well represented family, being recorded seven subfamilies. Based on these results, it was possible to state that the butterfly fauna in the Arboretum of Alagoas State comprises species commonly found in anthropic environments and/or areas under high anthropogenic influence.
... Butterflies (Lepidoptera: Papilionoidea) are particularly rich in this biome, which harbors about 58% of all Brazilian butterfly species (ca. 2,000 species), including a high level of endemism (45% of all Atlantic forest butterfly taxa are endemic) (Brown Jr 1991, 1992Brown Jr. and Freitas 2000;Iserhard et al. 2018;Casagrande and Duarte 2020). Consequently, several new butterfly taxa have been described from this biome in the last decade, even from well-studied regions (e.g., Dolibaina et al. 2017;Nakahara et al. 2017Nakahara et al. , 2019aNakahara et al. , 2019bZacca et al. 2017;Freitas et al. 2018;Pyrcz et al. 2018;Dias et al. 2019;Siewert et al. 2020;Dias et al. 2020; Barbosa et al. 2020). ...
Article
A new butterfly species, Dynamine sideria Rosa & Freitas sp. nov. (Nymphalidae: Biblidinae), is described from the Atlantic Forest in Southeastern Brazil. The new species is known from only seven adult specimens and three observation records (two from photographs) in five sites, including a large forest reserve, forest fragments on a disturbed landscape, and a backyard in a dense urban site. Illustrations of adults and male genitalia are provided, as well as a distribution map and limited natural history notes. See full text available online: https://rdcu.be/cqjHs
... With around 900 species, the Misiones province is the area with the greatest diversity of butterflies in Argentina (Avigliano and Schenone, 2015b;Núñez Bustos et al., 2013). The 500 species found in the CIAR and surroundings represent 70% of the species found in the Iguazú National Park (N ¼~700) (Núñez Bustos, 2009), 83% in comparison with the Yacutinga Reserve (N ¼~600, Misiones) (Núñez Bustos, 2008), and 40 and 25 % of the species recorded in Argentina and the whole ARF (N ¼~2000) (Iserhard et al., 2017), respectively, indicating that the CIAR and its surroundings are a butterfly hotspot for the entire ecoregion. In addition, Campo Ram on locality (CIAR and its surroundings forest) was indicated as one of the most important butterfly hotspots for Argentina (Klimaitis et al., 2018). ...
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Along many decades, protected environments were targeted by the scientific community for ecological research and for the collection of scientific information related to environmental aspects and biodiversity. However, most of the territory in hotspot regions with weak or even non legal protection has been left aside. These non-protected areas (NPA) could host high biodiversity values. This paper addresses how scientific effort on a NPA (CIAR) of 700 ha from the Atlantic Rain Forest, generates new information and tools for large-scale environmental and biodiversity management in NPAs. Information published during the last decade was summarized and complemented with subsequent novel data about biodiversity (new species, first records, DNA and chemical analyses, etc.). The results showed: 1 new genus (arachnid), 6 new species and several putative new species (fish and arthropod), 6 vulnerable species (bird and mammal) and 36 first records for Argentina (fish, arthropod, platyhelminth and fungi). When compared with protected natural areas of the same biome, the CIAR showed highly valuable aspects for fauna and environment conservation, positioning this NPA as a worldwide hotspot for some taxa. Indeed, when compared to international hotspots in a coordinated Malaise trap program, the CIAR showed 8,651 different barcode index numbers (~species) of arthropods, 80% of which had not been previously barcoded. Molecules like Inoscavin A, with antifungal activity against phytopathogens, was isolated for the first time in Phellinus merrillii fungi. The study of major threats derived from anthropic activities measured 20 trace elements, 18 pesticides (i.e. endosulfans, chlorpyrifos, DDTs, HCHs) and 27 pharmaceuticals and drugs (i.e. benzoylecgonine and norfluoxetine) in different biotic and abiotic matrices (water, sediment, fish and air biomonitors). This integrated data analysis shows that biodiversity research in NPA is being undervalued and how multidisciplinary and multitaxa surveys creates a new arena for research and a pathway towards sustainable development in emerging countries with biodiversity hotspots.
... With around 900 species, the Misiones province is the area with the greatest diversity of butterflies in Argentina (Avigliano and Schenone, 2015b;Núñez Bustos et al., 2013). The 500 species found in the CIAR and surroundings represent 70% of the species found in the Iguazú National Park (N ¼~700) (Núñez Bustos, 2009), 83% in comparison with the Yacutinga Reserve (N ¼~600, Misiones) (Núñez Bustos, 2008), and 40 and 25 % of the species recorded in Argentina and the whole ARF (N ¼~2000) (Iserhard et al., 2017), respectively, indicating that the CIAR and its surroundings are a butterfly hotspot for the entire ecoregion. In addition, Campo Ram on locality (CIAR and its surroundings forest) was indicated as one of the most important butterfly hotspots for Argentina (Klimaitis et al., 2018). ...
Article
Full-text available
Along many decades, protected environments were targeted by the scientific community for ecological research and for the collection of scientific information related to environmental aspects and biodiversity. However, most of the territory in hotspot regions with weak or even non legal protection has been left aside. These non-protected areas (NPA) could host high biodiversity values. This paper addresses how scientific effort on a NPA (CIAR) of 700 ha from the Atlantic Rain Forest, generates new information and tools for large-scale environmental and biodiversity management in NPAs. Information published during the last decade was summarized and complemented with subsequent novel data about biodiversity (new species, first records, DNA and chemical analyses, etc.). The results showed: 1 new genus (arachnid), 6 new species and several putative new species (fish and arthropod), 6 vulnerable species (bird and mammal) and 36 first records for Argentina (fish, arthropod, platyhelminth and fungi). When compared with protected natural areas of the same biome, the CIAR showed highly valuable aspects for fauna and environment conservation, positioning this NPA as a worldwide hotspot for some taxa. Indeed, when compared to international hotspots in a coordinated Malaise trap program, the CIAR showed 8,651 different barcode index numbers (~species) of arthropods, 80% of which had not been previously barcoded. Molecules like Inoscavin A, with antifungal activity against phytopathogens, was isolated for the first time in Phellinus merrillii fungi. The study of major threats derived from anthropic activities measured 20 trace elements, 18 pesticides (i.e. endosulfans, chlorpyrifos, DDTs, HCHs) and 27 pharmaceuticals and drugs (i.e. benzoylecgonine and norfluoxetine) in different biotic and abiotic matrices (water, sediment, fish and air biomonitors). This integrated data analysis shows that biodiversity research in NPA is being undervalued and how multidisciplinary and multitaxa surveys creates a new arena for research and a pathway towards sustainable development in emerging countries with biodiversity hotspots.
... Some important butterfly inventories were done in the Cerrado in the Federal District and in the state of Minas Gerais (Brown Jr. & Mielke, 1967a, 1967b, 1968Emery et al., 2006;Mielke et al., 2008;Motta, 2002). Few inventories were focused on the butterfly fauna of non-urban fragments of Atlantic Rainforest in Minas Gerais (Brown Jr. & Mielke, 1968;Brown Jr. & Freitas, 2000;Ebert, 1969;Silva et al., 2010), although a significative portion of the Brazilian butterfly diversity occurs in this domain (Iserhard et al., 2018). ...
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This paper investigates the butterfly fauna of the 'Serra do Rola-Moça' State Park, Minas Gerais, Brazil. We evaluate i) the seasonal variation of species richness and composition; and ii) the variation in composition of the local butterfly assemblage among three sampling sites and between the dry and rainy seasons. Sampling was carried out monthly between November 2012 and October 2013, using entomological nets. After a total sampling effort of 504 net hours, 311 species were recorded. One of them is endangered in Brazil, and eight are probable new species. Furthermore, two species were new records for the region and eight considered endemic of the Cerrado domain. There was no significant difference in species richness between the dry and the rainy seasons, however the species composition varies significantly among sampling sites. Due to its special, heterogeneous environment, which is home to a rich butterfly fauna, its preservation is important for the conservation of the regional butterfly fauna.
... Although the butterfly fauna of Brazil is relatively well sampled, there is still a "knowledge gap" in northeastern Brazil (Santos et al. 2008). The entire region is relatively under-sampled and poorly known, especially in the highly fragmented forests north of the mouth of São Francisco River (Freitas & Marini-Filho 2011, Iserhard et al. 2017). This region, which is known as the "Pernambuco Center of Endemism" (Brown Jr. 1977, Santos et al. 2007, is the most endangered sector of the Atlantic Forest, with less than 12% of the original vegetation remaining (Ribeiro et al. 2009), almost half as fragments smaller than 10 ha (Ranta et al. 1998). ...
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Despite being one of the groups most well studied in Brazil, the butterfly fauna of northeastern Brazil, especially north of the mouth of São Francisco River, is poorly known. The aim of this study was to inventory the butterfly fauna in a remnant of Atlantic Forest in the state of Pernambuco as a contribution to understanding the distribution of these insects. The study was carried out in a 384.7 hectares fragment of Parque Estadual Dois Irmãos, in the metropolitan region of Recife. The butterflies were sampled monthly with insect nets from August 2011 to July 2012 and from January to August 2016. Additional records were obtained from two entomological collections and from two previous visits to the area in July 2003 and August 2006. A total of 273 species was sampled in 464 hours, with an additional 15 species recorded from the Entomological Collections, totaling 288 butterfly species recorded. The richest family was Hesperiidae (108 species), followed by Nymphalidae (80), Lycaenidae (43) Riodinidae (37), Pieridae (16) and Papilionidae (4). The fauna was dominated by generalist species with a broad geographical distribution, many of them commonly found on open areas, forest edges and secondary vegetation. Roeberella lencates (Hewitson, 1875) and Pheles atricolor atricolor (Butler, 1871) (Riodinidae) represent new records for northeastern Brazil.
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