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Images: Clocks

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This article outlines teaching ideas appropriate for primary mathematics. It is mainly aimed at primary school teachers and teacher-educators. Have students engage in these challenging questions relating to time, subtraction, probability and multiplication based around these images of the iconic Flinders Street station and its famous clocks.
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CLOCKS
Foundation – Compare and order the
duration of events using the everyday
language of time (VCMMG079)
Year 1 and 2 – Tell time to the half-hour
(VCMMG096)
Which train is scheduled to leave
at midday?
Which two trains are leaving at
the same time (hint: the train line
on the far left chopped o in the
photograph is the Frankston line)?
If it is now 11am - and all the
clocks show afternoon times -
which train is leaving first? Put all
the trains in order, from the first to
the last to depart.
The Broadmeadows train departs
at 1:30pm and the Upfield train
at 1:42pm. It takes 45 minutes
to travel from Flinders St to
Broadmeadows, and 37 minutes to
travel from Flinders St to Upfield.
Which train will arrive at its
destination first?
It takes exactly twice as long to
travel from Flinders Street to
Frankston than from Flinders
Street to St Albans. The Frankston
train leaves Flinders Street at
1:30pm and arrives at Frankston
at 2:34pm. What time will the St
Albans train arrive in St Albans?
Year 3 and 4 –Tell time to the minute and
investigate the relationship between units of
time (VCMMG141)
FOUNDATION  YEAR  YEARS  AND 
PRIME NUMBER: VOLUME 33, NUMBER 2. 2018
© The Mathematical Association of Victoria
12
USE THIS PICTURE AS
A STIMULUS FOR
CLASSROOM TASKS
Each task is linked to the relevant
content descriptor from the
Victorian Curriculum.
VICTORIAN CURRICULUM
REFERENCE
Have students engage in these
challenging questions relating to
time, subtraction, probability and
multiplication based around these
images of the iconic Flinders Street
station and its famous clocks.
James Russo and Toby Russo
Lots of people say public
transport should be free. What do
you think are the arguments for
and against this? If approximately
110,000 people pass through
Flinders Street each day and each
of these passengers is paying
$8.60 for a daily fare, how much
money would they pay altogether
each day? What about each year?
How long would it take for these
passengers to pay one billion
dollars altogether? What about
one trillion dollars?
Flinders Street Station was built
in 1905. How old is it now? How
much older is the station than
you? Can you think of other
things that might be about the
same age?
Roman numerals are used on old
fashioned clocks. What do you
notice about the number 4 on
these clocks? Is it dierent to what
you might expect? Research the
reasons for this online.
There are 13 train platforms at
Flinders Street Station. Imagine,
on average, a train departs each
platform every 10 minutes and
each train stays at the station
for one minute. What is the
probability there will be a train on
Platform 7 at this exact moment?
What about on no platforms? On
all platforms?
Year 5 and 6 - Solve problems involving
multiplication of large numbers by one or two-
digit numbers using ecient mental, written
strategies and appropriate digital technologies
(VCMNA183)
The Prime Number team
are always on the lookout for
mathematically stimulating
images. Contact the editor
if you have a photo or a
suggestion, email
oce@mav.vic.edu.au.
YEARS  AND  EXTRA CHALLENGE
PRIME NUMBER: VOLUME 33, NUMBER 2. 2018
© The Mathematical Association of Victoria
13
Image:
Clocks by Julianmillar - Own work, CC
BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.
org/w/index.php?curid=10240477
Flinders Street Station by Adam.J.W.C.
- Own work, CC BY-SA 2.5, https://
commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.
php?curid=15905213
THE MATHEMATICAL
ASSOCIATION OF VICTORIA
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