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Abstract

This research report documents the nature and impact of a Consortium of 10 school boards a liated with the Council of Ontario Directors of Education (CODE) in leading bold and sophisticated change for today’s students, in one of the highest performing and most culturally diverse educational systems in the world – the province of Ontario in Canada. Over more than a decade, these boards built on an earlier approach by all of the province’s 72 boards to advance deep learning not by imposing reform from the top, or by supporting a multitude of initiatives among teachers and schools at the bottom of the system, by what educators themselves describe as “Leading from the Middle” (LfM).
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... The key to the success of an excellent education system depends on two elements which are a stable teaching profession [1] and followed by an excellent educational leadership that can influence students' achievements [2], [3]. The Malaysian government had paid special attention to these components to be applied in the Malaysia Education Blueprint 2013-2025 [4]. ...
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... The system they had managed to create through professional learning communities facilitated common learning processes and common visions that are viewed as essential in all innovations (Hall and Hord 2015;Leithwood 2018;Stoll et al. 2006). A crucial task for the learning organization is to reach a shared vision and demonstrate a congruent practice in the institution (Hargreaves et al. 2018;Stoll et al. 2006). In their capacity-building in the institutions, the leaders highlighted everyone's importance and responsibilities in working towards a common vision. ...
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This paper investigates early childhood education and care (ECEC) institutions’ opportunities to build a learning organization and master future innovations by focusing on core components, implementation drivers, leadership, and collective collaborative systems. The paper is based on results from semi-structured interviews with ten ECEC leaders from three different municipalities in Norway that had taken part in the Being Together (BT) innovation five years earlier. Three areas were identified as crucial for the continuation of ECEC teachers’ capacity building: (1) a strong focus on implementation processes and sustainability; (2) transformational leadership; and (3) developing professional learning communities. Potential challenges to building capacity in ECEC institutions include the variety of educational backgrounds among ECEC staff members in Norway and too little time to create professional learning communities.
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The author advocates for a new paradigm in education that builds on individual student's strengths and passions to bring value to our rapidly changing world of work and life.
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