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Abstract There is a lack of motivation in children and adolescents to do physical exercise and at the same time a worldwide obesity epidemic. Gamification and active videogames can be used to increase the motivation of young people, promoting healthy habits. In this work we explore different studies on active videogames, eSports and gamification applied to physical exercise and health promotion. Main findings include positive effects in a reduction in body weight and in the promotion to continue performing of physical exercise. It also contributes to increase the motivation in children and adolescents to practice exercise. The personalization of user experience and emerging technologies (big data, wearables, smart technologies, etc.) are presented as promising opportunities to keep the engagement in game-based program and gamification of physical exercise.
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... Health and fitness is the second largest area of research in gamification [2]. Previous studies have shown that gamification in fitness tracking apps can successfully promote physical activity and bodyweight reduction [23]. In the fitness context, personalisation of gamification involves real-time adjustment of difficulty based on physiological parameters such as heart rate [24] or acceleration [25]. ...
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A promising solution to increase user engagement in gamified applications is tailored gamification design. However, current personalisation relies primarily on user types identified through self-reporting rather than actual behaviour. As a novel approach, the present study used an exploratory machine learning analysis to identify seven clusters of users in a gamified fitness application based on their behavioural data (N = 19,576). The clusters were then conceptually compared to common user typologies in gamification, identifying possible relationships between behavioural user clusters and user types motivated by achievement, sociability, and extrinsic incentives. The findings shed light on nuanced behaviour patterns of user types in the fitness context and how knowing these patterns can inform the way in which tailored gamification could be implemented to meet the needs of specific types. Thereby, they contribute to the discussion on utilising behavioural data and user typologies for tailored gamification design.
... Intervention programs based on gamification have been designed to promote healthy habits from the school context [23,24]. This is the case, for example, of the FIT Game, a program aimed at increasing vegetable and fruit consumption in the school cafeteria [25]. ...
Chapter
Educating children in healthy lifestyle habits is one of the most effective ways to prevent future diseases such as obesity and improve their health. This chapter presents an educational intervention project to promote healthy lifestyle habits using active video games and gamified activities as a motivational tool towards healthier habits. In particular, we describe the workshops carried out in different primary schools using an active video game called TANGO:H and other gamified tools. The results of these workshops have shown a very high satisfaction with the intervention itself and the active video game .KeywordsExergamesHealthy habitsGamificationChildhood obesity
... The first category also includes those related to running or walking where gamification is incorporated. This effort to use the game in the teaching-learning process makes the user a participant in the process and, therefore, improves their involvement and motivation [36][37][38][39]. In addition, this type of app is consistent in its basic objectives with those recommended by the WHO [40] as heart health goals for the general population: 150 min of brisk walking or 75 min of running per week. ...
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The use of mobile devices has changed the way we relate to each other, influencing teaching–learning processes and the motivation of adolescents towards these processes. One of the most developed tools has been applications (apps), which are software used on cell phones, tablets or computers. Hence, the aim of this study is to analyze the content of applications for mobile devices that is considered the most suitable complement to Physical Education (PE) classes for secondary school students. A retrospective descriptive study was carried out, collecting information on the main characteristics of 31 free fitness apps: the descriptive, technical, educational and psychological dimensions. The results of this study show that most of the apps for physical activity have recent updates and are mainly related to cardiovascular exercise or strength for two purposes: either for exercise accounting or the creation of training plans for the user. They are intended for users of very heterogeneous ages and, therefore, do not take into account their individual characteristics. They do not have an adequate design to facilitate their didactic use. Therefore, we conclude that the applications evaluated lack the necessary educational potential to be used in the PE classroom. Based on the content analysis carried out, we describe a series of criteria that allow teachers and adolescents themselves to select physical exercise apps, and we propose to carry out research to guide developers when developing digital training/physical exercise content with an educational component that can be used as a complement for adolescents in- and outside the field of PE.
... Accordingly, a recent review concluded that social contests increase engagement but may also have a negative effect [20]. In general, this study supports previous research outlining the positive effects of gamification and social features on DHIs [133][134][135][136][137][138][139][140][141]. ...
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Background: Mobile health (mHealth) apps show vast potential in supporting patients and health care systems with the increasing prevalence and economic costs of noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) worldwide. However, despite the availability of evidence-based mHealth apps, a substantial proportion of users do not adhere to them as intended and may consequently not receive treatment. Therefore, understanding the factors that act as barriers to or facilitators of adherence is a fundamental concern in preventing intervention dropouts and increasing the effectiveness of digital health interventions. Objective: This review aimed to help stakeholders develop more effective digital health interventions by identifying factors influencing the continued use of mHealth apps targeting NCDs. We further derived quantified adherence scores for various health domains to validate the qualitative findings and explore adherence benchmarks. Methods: A comprehensive systematic literature search (January 2007 to December 2020) was conducted on MEDLINE, Embase, Web of Science, Scopus, and ACM Digital Library. Data on intended use, actual use, and factors influencing adherence were extracted. Intervention-related and patient-related factors with a positive or negative influence on adherence are presented separately for the health domains of NCD self-management, mental health, substance use, nutrition, physical activity, weight loss, multicomponent lifestyle interventions, mindfulness, and other NCDs. Quantified adherence measures, calculated as the ratio between the estimated intended use and actual use, were derived for each study and compared with the qualitative findings. Results: The literature search yielded 2862 potentially relevant articles, of which 99 (3.46%) were included as part of the inclusion criteria. A total of 4 intervention-related factors indicated positive effects on adherence across all health domains: personalization or tailoring of the content of mHealth apps to the individual needs of the user, reminders in the form of individualized push notifications, user-friendly and technically stable app design, and personal support complementary to the digital intervention. Social and gamification features were also identified as drivers of app adherence across several health domains. A wide variety of patient-related factors such as user characteristics or recruitment channels further affects adherence. The derived adherence scores of the included mHealth apps averaged 56.0% (SD 24.4%). Conclusions: This study contributes to the scarce scientific evidence on factors that positively or negatively influence adherence to mHealth apps and is the first to quantitatively compare adherence relative to the intended use of various health domains. As underlying studies mostly have a pilot character with short study durations, research on factors influencing adherence to mHealth apps is still limited. To facilitate future research on mHealth app adherence, researchers should clearly outline and justify the app’s intended use; report objective data on actual use relative to the intended use; and, ideally, provide long-term use and retention data.
... Traditionally, gaming may have been viewed as a sedentary activity, whereas both parents and adolescents in a healthy weight range now perceive and describe virtual reality interventions as a promising approach for increasing physical activity levels [40,41]. Gamification, the use of game design principles to influence socially significant human behavior [42], has been incorporated as a way to modify health behaviors such as dietary habits and physical activity [43,44]. When technological gamification was used as a means to promote weight management among school-aged children, researchers discovered that this method was effective at reducing children's BMI [45]. ...
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