Article

Naturally Occurring Hair Growth Peptide: Water-Soluble Chicken Egg Yolk Peptides Stimulate Hair Growth Through Induction of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Production

Authors:
  • NCIRE - The Veterans Heath Research Institute, UCSF
To read the full-text of this research, you can request a copy directly from the authors.

Abstract

Alopecia is divided into two categories: androgenic alopecia and nonandrogenic alopecia. An androgen-dependent abnormality of biological functions causes alopecia in males, but the role of androgens is not yet elucidated in female pattern hair loss (FPHL). Modulation of androgenic activity is not effective in certain kinds of androgenic alopecia in females, as well as in cases of nonandrogenic alopecia in males and females. The hair growth drug, minoxidil, stimulates vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) production as well as vascularization and hair growth in females. Yet, because minoxidil has side effects with long-term use, a safe alternative hair growth agent is needed. Whereas hair develops after birth in mammalian species, hair mostly grows in a precocial bird, in the chicken, between hatching day 14 and 15. Therefore, we hypothesized that the chicken egg contains a key hair growth factor. In this study, we demonstrated that water-soluble peptides derived from the egg yolk stimulate VEGF production and human hair follicle dermal papilla cell growth. We also found that these peptides enhance murine hair growth and improve hair growth in FPHL. Finally, we characterized that water-soluble egg yolk peptides induce VEGF expression through insulin growth factor-1 receptor activation-induced hypoxia-inducible factor-1α transcription pathway. We have given the name 'hair growth peptide (HGP)' to this water-soluble egg yolk peptide.

No full-text available

Request Full-text Paper PDF

To read the full-text of this research,
you can request a copy directly from the authors.

... Reversed-phase HPLC The peptide QSLVSVPGMS showed strong antioxidative (DPPH free radical scavenging) and ACE-inhibitory activities. (Eckert et al., 2019) Water-soluble peptides appeared in the hatching period Peptide purification; Cell culture; Cell signaling analysis Induce expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (through the IGF-1/HIF-1 pathway); Stimulate human hair follicle dermal papilla cell proliferation; Stimulate hair growth (Nakamura et al., 2018) Proteolysis by chymotrypsin-like and pepsin-like enzymes Peptidomic study; Functional screening assays; MALDI-TOF-TOF-MS; nanoLC-ESI-Q-Orbitrap-MS/MS Bioactive peptides were found in proteolytic fractions of yolk plasma; 198 peptides were characterized to have potential antihypertensive, antimicrobial, anticancer, and anti-inflammatory effects (Arena and Scaloni, 2018) Treated by peptide-N4-asparagineamidase; N-glycans were released SDS-PAGE; Normal phase liquid chromatography; MALDI-TOF/TOF MS; nanoLC-ESI MS IgY is a new therapeutic glycoprotein in yolk; N-glycan sites and structures of IgY were revealed; Two N-glycosylation sites linked to ASN308 and ASN409 were identified, with high-mannose, hybrid and complex oligosaccharides (Sheng et al., 2018) Polypeptide Y complex (Yolkin) from egg yolk Rat learning tasks and behavioural tests Pro-cognitive effect; Immunoregulatory effect; Benefit behavioural and cognitive functions; Prevent dementia (Lemieszewska et al., 2016) Precipitation and purification using ethanol and acetone Cellular studies; Cytokine measurement Yolkin, an active polypeptide complex isolated from egg yolk; Stimulate human blood cells to release anti-inflammatory cytokines and neurotrophins; Neuroprotective effect: may be a natural food supplement or therapeutic agent for cognitive disorders (Zambrowicz et al., 2017) human diseases. ...
... The long-term disadvantages of hair-growth drugs need to be reduced in the treatment of adult alopecia (Nakamura et al., 2018). Considering that chicken hairs grow fast at day 14 of hatching, Nakamura et al identified a key hair-growth peptide (HGP) in HEY, and HGP stimulated the IGF-1 receptor/HIF-1/VEGF signaling pathway and promoted human hair-follicle-cell growth and murine hair growth, putting forward to a natural alternative agent for preventing hair loss (Nakamura et al., 2018). ...
... The long-term disadvantages of hair-growth drugs need to be reduced in the treatment of adult alopecia (Nakamura et al., 2018). Considering that chicken hairs grow fast at day 14 of hatching, Nakamura et al identified a key hair-growth peptide (HGP) in HEY, and HGP stimulated the IGF-1 receptor/HIF-1/VEGF signaling pathway and promoted human hair-follicle-cell growth and murine hair growth, putting forward to a natural alternative agent for preventing hair loss (Nakamura et al., 2018). Kobayashi et al determined the role of HEY hydrolysates in the bone metabolism of dogs, and the EDPs up-regulated the bone growth biomarker BAP in dog serum and promoted bone formation in dogs (Kobayashi et al., 2015a,b). ...
Article
Hen eggs (HEs) provide valuable nutrients for humans, including proteins, carbohydrates, lipids and vitamins. Recent studies revealed a number of novel egg-derived proteins/peptides (EDPs), and EDPs may play a crucial role in food industry and medical therapy. First, these EDPs were purified from the enzyme-catalyzed hydrolysates of egg proteins and were characterized by biochemical assays such as gel electrophoresis, HPLC, mass spectrometry, proteomic and peptideomic analysis, etc. Second, some EDPs can be used as nontoxic bio-preservatives and functional nutraceuticals for replacing harmful sodium nitrite, inhibiting foodborne pathogens, promoting metal-ion absorption and improving meat-product quality, and these new features will be widely used in the field of food production. Third, novel medical properties of EDPs comprise anti-oxidative, anti-microbial, anti-inflammatory and anti-nociceptive activities, which will benefit prevention of cardiovascular diseases, cancers, diabetic mellitus, immune disorders, etc. In summary, this review gives a real insight into the novel nutritional, biological and medical functions of EDPs, predictably facilitating the applications of EDPs in production of nutritive supplements, functional nutraceuticals and therapeutic medicines.
... While studies regarding the use of egg yolks in treating hair loss remains limited, one study has suggested that key peptides within egg yolks contain growth factor-stimulating properties that contribute to induction of hair growth (Table 8) [102]. Nakamura et al. found that water-soluble hair growth peptides (HGP) contained within egg yolks were capable of stimulating vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and subsequent proliferation of human dermal papilla cells [102]. ...
... While studies regarding the use of egg yolks in treating hair loss remains limited, one study has suggested that key peptides within egg yolks contain growth factor-stimulating properties that contribute to induction of hair growth (Table 8) [102]. Nakamura et al. found that water-soluble hair growth peptides (HGP) contained within egg yolks were capable of stimulating vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and subsequent proliferation of human dermal papilla cells [102]. Hair growth was also observed in a murine model and in a female pattern hair loss model [102]. ...
... Nakamura et al. found that water-soluble hair growth peptides (HGP) contained within egg yolks were capable of stimulating vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and subsequent proliferation of human dermal papilla cells [102]. Hair growth was also observed in a murine model and in a female pattern hair loss model [102]. Additionally, they found that HGP likely promotes VEGF expression via activation of an insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor and subsequent induction of a hypoxia-inducible factor-1α transcription pathway [102]. ...
Article
Full-text available
Background: The impact that hair loss has on an individual's psychological wellness, and subsequent quality of life, is widespread and long lasting. The current standard treatments for hair loss include surgery and medications, ranging from over-the-counter treatments to corticosteroid injections and immunosuppressants. Unfortunately, these current treatments are either expensive, invasive, or have extremely negative side effects. Recently, the role of vitamins, minerals, and functional foods with their associated bioactive compounds, have gained increasing recognition as a potential means to address this issue. Some of these compounds have been shown to decrease the risk of specific forms of hair loss, particularly alopecia, a form of balding that results due from an autoimmune disorder. These include experimental studies using black raspberry extract and egg yolks as well as epidemiological studies using Mediterranean diets and various micronutrients. Other compounds have been shown to promote hair growth on a more general scale, including in vivo studies using rice bran extract and mouse models using red ginseng oil and annurca apple polyphenols. This review identifies key hair growth promoting vitamins, minerals, and functional foods, as well as summarizes the relevant mechanisms of action of these compounds that have been elucidated. Knowledge regarding the effects of these nutriceuticals on reducing hair loss is rapidly expanding. However, it is imperative that further research be done in order to delineate mechanisms of actions for all compounds related to managing and treating hair loss and subsequently integrate these dietary modifications into clinical treatment recommendations for hair loss.Keywords: Hair loss, alopecia, berry extract, mediterranean diet, rice bran, ginseng, annurca apple, thuja orientalis, marine supplement, honey, egg yolk, functional foods, bioactive compounds
Article
Full-text available
Androgenetic alopecia (AGA) is characterized by a non-scarring progressive miniaturization of the hair follicle in predisposed men and women with a pattern distribution. Although AGA is a very prevalent condition, approved therapeutic options are limited. This article discusses the current treatment alternatives including their efficacy, safety profile, and quality of evidence. Finasteride and minoxidil for male androgenetic alopecia and minoxidil for female androgenetic alopecia still are the therapeutic options with the highest level evidence. The role of antiandrogens for female patients, the importance of adjuvant therapies, as well as new drugs and procedures are also addressed.