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Smart squid skin: patterns in networks of artificial chromatophores

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... Fisherman et al. developed an artificial chromatophore cell array using a dielectric elastomer (DE). Dynamic color-changing mode could be achieved by relative feedback control mechanism of regional strain [30]. Wang et al. manufactured a bionic machine chameleon utilizing bimetallic nano-point array and electrochemical bias method basing on plasma modulation techniques [31]. ...
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