Chapter

Establishing a Community Literacy Programme. In Darren Lingley & Paul Daniels (Ed.) 2018. Raising Bilingual and Bicultural Children: Essays from the Inaka. Tokyo: Japan Association for Language Teaching. pp.143 - 155 (ISSN: 2433-6920)

Chapter

Establishing a Community Literacy Programme. In Darren Lingley & Paul Daniels (Ed.) 2018. Raising Bilingual and Bicultural Children: Essays from the Inaka. Tokyo: Japan Association for Language Teaching. pp.143 - 155 (ISSN: 2433-6920)

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Abstract

Raising Bilingual and Bicultural Children: Essays from the Inaka Darren Lingley & Paul Daniels (Ed.) 2018 This monograph celebrates the experience of raising bilingual and bicultural children in Japan. Our shared stories specifically focus on the unique challenges of raising bilingual children in Japan’s inaka, or more peripheral rural areas. Personal, accessible and reflective in its remit, this edited volume monograph represents a strong contribution to an under-represented aspect of bilingualism in Japan.

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Chapter
IntroductionDefining and MeasuringAcquiring Bilingual CompetenceTheoretical PerspectivesBilingualism and IntelligenceBorrowing, Interference and Code SwitchingSome Social AspectsBilingualism and Identity
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