Article

The short time effect of spirulina supplementation on some oxidative stress markers of elite endurance cyclist

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Abstract

Background and aims: The aim of this study was to investigate short time effect of spirulina supplementation on serum malondialdehyde (MDA) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) level. Methods: The study design was quasi experimental with pre and post-test. For this reason, 14 male endurance cyclist (age 20.5±1.4, height 180.21±4.33, weight 66.4±2.16, BMI 20.22±0.7, VO2Max 71.78±2.93) that they are/were member of Iran national team were selected as participant. 1 week before test, Participants were asked to stop all supplements consumption containing vitamins and minerals which they have been using. Resting Blood sample were taken of fasting, for assessing research variable at least 18 hours after last their training session. After exhaustive exercise and body composition assessment at pretest, participates were derived into 2 groups, based on BMI (Spirulina group n=7, control group n=7). Participants used supplements in same way and same principle (6×500mg tablet per day) for 2 weeks. After 2 weeks supplementation, blood sample was taken for resting value of MDA and SOD. Results: Between and within groups analysis demonstrated significant increase in SOD and MDA levels under effect of exercise and 2 weeks spirulina supplementation reduced and increased significantly MDA levels (P<0.05) and SOD levels (P<0.05) at rest and after exhaustive exercise- in Spirulina group in comparison with placebo group. Conclusion: According to results, 2 weeks of spirulina supplementation can reduce oxidative stress in elite endurance cyclist.

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