Conference Paper

Throughput optimization for wireless information and power transfer in communication network

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Abstract

In this paper, a relay-based wireless communication model is studied. Such a model is capable of relaying information and power in either direction. At the relay amplify-then-forward scheme is used. Two relaying protocols viz. time switching-based relaying and power splitting-based relaying is used to facilitate this two-way information and power transfer.Asingle relay model is considered, an end to end throughput expression for our model is derived mathematically by using both the relaying protocols. Dependence of system throughput on parameters which are time switching ratio and the power splitting ratio is studied. Results show that there exists an optimal value of splitting ratio and switching ratio for a given relay position, to obtain optimal throughput. The simulation shows that relay placement significantly affects the system throughput performance.

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... In time switching, the EH and information decoding takes place through the same antenna at different time slots. Whereas in power splitting, the EH and information decoding takes place through the same antenna at the same time but with varying levels of power [17,18]. Time switching receiver with a helical antenna is used in this paper due to its comparatively compact form factor of 0.5, and effectively high EH efficiency [16,19]. ...
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