PosterPDF Available

Abstract

This poster session presents considerations for post-doctoral perspectives of researcher positionality within dissertation research at one online university. Researcher positionality is essential for valuable self-examination of new investigators, especially those who desire to focus on a dissertation research problem from professional practice. A doctoral candidate acquires a researcher identity whereby the candidate must consider and integrate through an iterative and evolutionary process of reflection and integration throughout the research experience to distinguish an emergent positionality, and these perspectives often evolve post-doc as the researcher continues to engage within the scholarly community. Consideration for the inherent dualities of insider/outsider and positionality can offer a transparency necessary to the perspectives brought to the inquiry especially for practice-based research a doctoral graduate may navigate from a post-doc perspective.
Presenters: Robin Throne, PhD, Northcentral University; Linda K. Bowlin, PhD, Southeastern University; Vahick Yedgarian, PhD, University of California, Los Angeles
Contributors: Brian Bourke, PhD, Murray State University; Susan Joseph, PhD, Cochran School of Nursing; Victoria Hailey, PhD, Minnesota State University, Mankato
Insider/Outsider, Betwixt and Between: Post-Doc Perspectives of Researcher Positionality after Dissertation Research
RESEARCHER POSITIONALITY
IN CONTEXT
Researcher positionality can be considered
within the multi-faceted, complex, and
necessary structures surrounding an
inquiry before it could or should be
engaged (Bourke, 2014; Throne, 2012). It
can also offer a transparency necessary to
the perspectives brought to the inquiry or
the perspectives that serve to frame it and
the internal aspects of the researcher as a
complex instrument within the inquiry.
Conveyance of positionality purports the
power structures and social identities of an
investigator to fully self-identity their place
and position within the scholarship of the
field or discipline, and especially to define a
clear viewpoint in drawing conclusions and
implications from the results of any inquiry.
ABSTRACT
This poster session presents considerations
for post-doctoral perspectives of researcher
positionality within dissertation research at
one online university. Researcher
positionality is essential for valuable self-
examination of new investigators, especially
those who desire to focus on a dissertation
research problem from professional practice.
A doctoral candidate acquires a researcher
identity whereby the candidate must
consider and integrate through an iterative
and evolutionary process of reflection and
integration throughout the research
experience to distinguish an emergent
positionality, and these perspectives often
evolve post-doc as the researcher continues
to engage within the scholarly community.
Consideration for the inherent dualities of
insider/outsider and positionality can offer a
transparency necessary to the perspectives
brought to the inquiry especially for practice-
based research a doctoral graduate may
navigate from a post-doc perspective.
POST-DOC RESEARCHER POSITIONALITY
When entering the important and priority-
shifting engagement with graduate-level
scholarship, it is important to understand
one’s own position within this landscape
before determining how to conduct research
within it. Researcher positionality is often
considered a necessary process of a
principal investigator for critical self-reflection
and a determination of self within the social
constructs, biases, contexts, layers, power
structures, identities, transparency,
objectivity and subjectivities for the viewpoint
assumed within the research. The
acknowledgement of the role and potential
influence of researcher bias is a critical
component of qualitative researcher.
Through acknowledging biases, and
subjectivities, both of which are products of
individual positionalities, qualitative
researchers engage themselves as part of
the researcher.
Researcher positionality shifts during the
dissertation journey as doctoral scholars
acquire a researcher identity whereby an
iterative and evolutionary process of
reflection and integration occurs throughout
the research. An important aspect of the
integrative process is to assess the multiple
identities as professional practitioner,
scholar, and investigator as positionality
must also be considered within the multi-
faceted, complex, and necessary structures
surrounding research within the discipline.
The dissertation chair must guide the
doctoral scholar to recognize and take into
account the situated positionality within the
research setting. This is essential when the
researcher considers inquiry within a
workplace research setting where they
maintain the dual identities of practice
professional/new researcher. We asked
post-doctoral scholars to reflect on this after
the doctoral dissertation to pause and
declare the post-doc researcher’s
positionality (see Figure 1).
DISSERTATION CHAIR AGENCY
Strong mentoring ethos
Healthy & diverse communication style
Priority for quality chair-candidate
relationship
Resource driven not chair driven
Consistent iterative documental feedback
Transformative investigator development
Incremental scholarly writing development
Incremental research skill development
Meaningful suspense dates remain flexible
Celebratory dissertation journey measures
(THRONE, ODDI, ET AL., 2017)
RESEARCHER POSITIONALITY
BYDEFINITION
Researcher positionality (noun) A necessary
process of a principal investigator for critical
self-reflection and a determination
of self within the social constructs, biases,
contexts, layers, power structures, identities,
transparency, objectivity and subjectivities
for the viewpoint assumed within the
research.
As bias remains a naturally occurring human
characteristic, positionality is often used in
the context of the inductive approach to
social science inquiry as an exploration of
the investigator’s reflection on one’s own
placement within the many contexts, layers,
power structures, identities, and
subjectivities of the viewpoint (England,
1994; Ganga & Scott, 2006). Positionality
allows for a narrative placement for
researcher objectivity and subjectivity
whereby the researcher is situated within the
many aspects of perspective and
positionality (Lave & Wenger, 1991). This
often serves to inform a research study
rather than to invalidate it as biased or
contaminated by personal perspectives and
social or political viewpoints (Bourke, 2014;
Bowlin, Buckner, & Throne, 2016).
Figure 1. A Four-Case Assimilation of Post-Doc Situated
Researcher Positionality (N=4).
KEY REFERENCES
Bourke, B. (2014). Positionality: Reflecting on the research
process. The Qualitative Report, 19, 19.
Bowlin, L. K., Buckner, S. A., & Throne, R. (2016). Duality,
positionality, and stance: Workplace dissertation research as
preparation for practice-based research. Twelfth International
Congress of Qualitative Inquiry, University of Illinois, Urbana-
Champaign.
Lave, J. & Wenger, E. (1991). Situated learning: Legitimate
peripheral participation. New York: Cambridge University Press.
Throne, R. (2012). Positionality. In Practitioner research in doctoral
education (p. 56). Dubuque, IA: Kendall Hunt.
Throne, R., Oddi, B., Fore, C. J., Akagi, C, Bloomberg, L., Clowes,
M. C., O'Connor Duffy, J., Riggle, B., St. Louis, L., Shaw, M., &
Wardlow, R. (2017). The Situated Dissertation Advising Framework
for improved doctoral completion in a School of Education. 1st
Annual Conference on Academic Research in Education.
... In a critical review of the factors of doctoral student attrition, the authors previously noted the high attrition rate in U.S. doctoral programs has proffered much research to explain why doctoral students exit these programs, regardless of delivery modality, prior to dissertation completion (Baghurst, 2013;Rigler et al., 2017). In addition, the authors have identified that a positive, relational, and nonhierarchical online mentoring supervision style was a key determinant for doctoral degree and dissertation research completion in an online U.S. doctoral education program (Throne & Duffy, 2016;Throne et al., 2018;Throne et al., 2017;Throne et al., 2015). Yet, online doctoral students repeatedly report problematic relationships with the dissertation research supervisor as an impediment to dissertation completion regardless of delivery modality (Akagi & Fore, 2016;Levitch & Shaw, 2014;Rigler et al., 2017). ...
... The requisites to the assessment of research supervisor agency, and specifically in the ability to facilitate doctoral researcher positionality, are related to the research supervisor's capacity to ensure that new doctoral investigators conduct quality dissertation research. In addition, the supervisor should guide doctoral candidates to evolve into engaged participants within the doctoral scholarly community (Lave & Wenger, 1991;Gardner, 2010;Throne & Duffy, 2016;Throne et al., 2018;Throne et al., 2017). Doctoral program leadership must also be cognizant of the unique characteristics found among the doctoral program and the unique demographic profile of the graduate student body to best improve doctoral researcher engagement within the doctoral community (Gardner, 2010). ...
... While this rationale promotes the importance of the promotion of student agency, the authors' collective understanding of online dissertation supervisor agency predominantly emerged from their past work toward a situated dissertation advising framework (SDAF) (Akagi & Fore, 2016;Clowes, Shaw, & Throne, 2016;Throne & Duffy, 2016;Throne et al., 2018;Throne et al., 2017;Throne et al., 2015). In the SDAF, the authors identified key characteristics among a formal approach that online research supervisors need to improve online doctoral student persistence and dissertation completion, especially among the dissertation research phase of an online doctoral program. ...
Chapter
This chapter critically explores the construct of agency from a dissertation research supervisor perspective. While the literature has expanded in the exploration of student agency, little focus has been given to the construct from a research supervisor agency stance. Current research into doctoral completion has shown the relationship between supervisor and dissertation writer as critical to persistence and completion. However, less investigation has focused on the aspects of dissertation supervisor agency and the evolution to a high mentoring approach, especially for online doctoral students. The conceptual inquiry utilizes the lens of Lave and Wenger's situated learning theory to view how research supervisor agency can foster and guide doctoral scholars to consider researcher positionality and move from the margins of the doctoral learning community to the center of scholarly life and post-doctoral practice-based research and evidence-based decision making.
... Researcher positionality can be considered within the multi-faceted, complex, and necessary structures surrounding research inquiry before it can or should be assessed and engaged (Bourke, 2014;Throne, 2012;Throne, Bourke et al., 2018). Through articulation of an online graduate student's researcher positionality, especially for new investigators, a necessary transparency can be offered to situate and view perspectives for the inquiry or the study frame as the internal aspects of the researcher as one transforms to a complex instrument within the inquiry (Nencel, 2014;Throne, Bourke et al., 2018). ...
... Researcher positionality can be considered within the multi-faceted, complex, and necessary structures surrounding research inquiry before it can or should be assessed and engaged (Bourke, 2014;Throne, 2012;Throne, Bourke et al., 2018). Through articulation of an online graduate student's researcher positionality, especially for new investigators, a necessary transparency can be offered to situate and view perspectives for the inquiry or the study frame as the internal aspects of the researcher as one transforms to a complex instrument within the inquiry (Nencel, 2014;Throne, Bourke et al., 2018). Conveyance of this positionality purports the power structures, ideological assumptions, and social identities of an investigator to fully self-identity their place and position within the scholarship of the field or discipline, and especially to define and explicate a clear viewpoint to draw inferential conclusions and implications from the results of any inquiry (Dean et al., 2017) and in the relational aspects with study participants (Moore, 2012). ...
... Thus, the research supervisor who is remote from the graduate student must engage the student to recognize and consider the situated positionality within the research setting and its participants. This is an especially essential phase when the researcher considers inquiry within a workplace research setting or from a particular social justice stance where they maintain multiple identities of professional, activist, scholar, and independent researcher (Bowlin, Buckner, & Throne, 2016;Throne, Bourke et al., 2018). ...
Chapter
This chapter has pedagogical implications for online graduate students to define researcher positionality. It offers graduate-level examples for the articulation of researcher positionality within online graduate-level research including theses, dissertations, and academic writings. This chapter is relevant to current master's thesis or doctoral dissertation writers at American institutions of higher education through distance, blended, or hybrid delivery modes. The authors suggest instructional strategies and a research supervisor agency to guide current master's thesis or doctoral dissertation writers in the articulation of researcher positionality. This fosters self-awareness of an online researcher's stance, subjectivities, proclivities, and standpoint prior to study participant engagement for data collection. This chapter may also be applicable to tenure-track faculty in need of this exposition for current empirical research and/or graduate student instruction.
... For this study, a definition of researcher positionality relied upon prior work by Bourke (2014), Throne (2012Throne ( , 2018aThrone ( , 2018b, and Bowlin, Buckner, and Throne (2016) over the past two years informed the inquiry to consider an authentic other narrative voice and to assess the fidelity of self as researcher and self-identified researcher positionality throughout the inquiry to dissect another's language to recount narrative voice as remnant of dispossession . This definition subscribes to the identification of one's positionality as a necessary process of a principal investigator for critical self-reflection and a determination of this selfawareness within the social constructs, biases, contexts, layers, power structures, identities, transparency, objectivity and subjectivities for the viewpoint assumed within the research (Bourke, 2014;Bowlin et al., 2016;Throne, 2012;Throne et al., 2018). ...
... Researcher consciousness of self and subsequent declarative viewpoint allows for more transparent inquiry into the experience of the other and reduces the dangers of filtering data via researcher perspectives that are blind to racialized and cultural patterns existent within the dataset (Milner, 2007) or those perceived as appealing to an audience's sentimentality (Mielke, 2002) such has been noted for the Native American lived experience amidst generational acculturation or for descendants who continued to live amidst policy consequences of removal and subsequent acculturation and assimilation policy (Bataille & Mullen Sands, 1984;Gunn Allen, 1986;DeMarni Cromer et al., 2018). Or even more horrendous, as some researchers have noted, the aftermath of an intentional extermination or policy for legalized genocide (Anderson, G. C., 2016;Gunn Allen, 1986;Ostler, 2016) therefore, the responsibility of fidelity rests with researcher positionality, and an essential aspect of the integrative process is to assess the multiple identities as practitioner, scholar, and investigator as the fidelity of research positionality rests upon the multifaceted, complex, and necessary structures within the narrative data as spatiotemporally situated (Bowlin et al., 2016;Throne, 2012;Throne et al., 2018). ...
Article
Full-text available
This feminist narrative research explored the fidelity of researcher positionality and Leavy's coherence to consider an archival personal letter from the Sauk warrior Black Hawk's great great daughter, Mary Kakaque, written to John Henry Hauberg, an Illinois philanthropist. Future research is needed to characterize Mary's educational experiences amid an era of cultural annihilation and assimilation within the collective narrative of Hauberg's interpretations, paraphrases, and summaries of Mary's existence, and a phenomenological study to explore Mary's lived experience within the full archival Hauberg collection to consider the constructs of voice or resilience as the lived experiences of Black Hawk's female descendants remain limited. In addition, a critical ethnography may be warranted for ancestral effects of relocation and assimilation from the perspectives of living Black Hawk and Mary's female descendants to contribute a contemporary perspective on voice, culture, and the legacy of land dispossession.
... "Where do I begin and how exactly do I actually do autoethnography?" Before embarking on a self-as-subject autoethnographical study, doctoral researchers must distinguish, understand, and articulate their own researcher positionality (Throne et al., 2018;Throne, 2019). Researcher positionality describes both the researcher's worldview and also the position they have chosen or has been pre-determined for them in the proposed and specific research (Savin-Baden & Howell Major, 2013;Throne, 2019). ...
Chapter
For some doctoral practitioner-researchers, the methods used within autoethnography and other self-inquiry-based research methods are appropriate for a practitioner dissertation as the phenomenon of inquiry is a central human, intrinsic, and experiential self-focused construct. The tenets of autoethnography and other self-as-subject research support the view that new knowledge can be discoverable from within the individual lived experience, and this chapter presents current trends and scholarship for the use of autoethnography and other self-inquiry research methods for practice-based doctoral research. The chapter also presents one case from a recent doctoral autoethnographer to illustrate the experience of a practice-based autoethnographic dissertation study within a practitioner doctoral program.
... As the commonly used Heraclitus' quote (cited by Plato, Cratylus 402a) illustrated, the uninterrupted flow meant no person can step twice into the same river; likewise, no autoethnographer can replicate data analysis later from an autoethnographic study-as subsequent to the study, the researcher-as-subject has changed, evolved, transformed, and likely to see insights in analysis not readily apparent earlier or even erroneous insights from the former analysis. These transformative experiences within analyses coupled with researcher positionality can certainly vary post-doctorate once the terminal degree is attained from those identified as doctoral candidate and shift even further once the researcher enters the academy (Golding & Foley, 2017;Throne et al., 2018). Further, it may be the very fluidity, flexibility, and shape-shifting aspects of autoethnography (as Ellis et al., 2011, noted both process and product) as a doctoral-level research design that appeals to the doctoral scholar and remains the ideal approach to explore the specific lived construct or phenomenon of the inquiry within a larger psychological, societal, educational, artistic, or professional context (Denshire, 2014). ...
Chapter
This chapter presents reflections on the use of self-as-subject research within doctoral education as a pathway to explore meaning of study phenomena to uncover new knowledge from the individual of the self. Knowledge is contextual and discoverable from within this rich internal experience of the researcher-participant and extant and contemporary perspectives are presented to illustrate the importance and appropriateness of the selection of self-as-subject research methods including autoethnography and heuristic inquiry for doctoral-level research. The importance of the relational aspects of the doctoral researcher and doctoral research supervisor is briefly considered as well as contextual and institutional aspects necessary to inform doctoral researchers who may choose these methods of inquiry.
... While initially, the learner may reside at the periphery of the respective learning community, over time the learner becomes more socialized, engaged, and active within the learning culture until assuming a pinnacle role as an expert. (Throne et al., 2018) Lave and Wenger (1991) coined the term communities of practice, which has evolved to be defined as any group who engage in collective learning within a particular domain (Wenger, 1998(Wenger, , 2011. As members of the doctoral learning community, doctoral faculty, doctoral research supervisors, and the ancillary members of the community such as library and information science (LIS) professionals, can support the doctoral scholar to move from the periphery to the center of the doctoral learning community (Throne, 2020). ...
Chapter
This chapter presents the results of a systematic review of the current scholarship into doctoral student agency from a U.S. perspective. In past work, the authors and others have explored doctoral student and research supervisor agency from the perspective of scholar-practitioner agency within the doctoral learning community as well as the post-doctorate practice-based research agenda. This chapter focuses on a systematic analysis of the current scholarship published since 2019 that has continued to examine the aspects of doctoral student voice, agency, academic identity, and dissemination of graduate student research. Theoretical perspectives are drawn from the scholarship of situated learning theory and other theories that define how and why doctoral students are able to move from the periphery of the doctoral learning community to entrance into the scholarly academic and publishing community.
... In past work, the chapter authors with others have noted socialization and collaboration are essential components of situated learning theory whereby the learner participates within a community of practice comprised of the established conventions, beliefs, and behaviors to be acquired. While initially, the learner may reside at the periphery of the respective learning community, over time the learner becomes more socialized, engaged, and active within the learning culture until assuming a pinnacle role as an expert (Throne et al., 2018) Lave and Wenger (1991) coined the term communities of practice, which has evolved to be defined as any group who engage in collective learning within a particular domain (Wenger, 1998(Wenger, , 2011. As members of the doctoral learning community, doctoral faculty, doctoral research supervisors, and the ancillary members of the community such as library and information science (LIS) professionals, can support the doctoral scholar to move from the periphery to the center of the doctoral learning community (Throne, 2020). ...
Preprint
This chapter presents the results of a systematic review of the current scholarship into doctoral student agency from a global perspective. In past work, the authors with others have explored doctoral student and research supervisor agency from the perspective of scholar-practitioner agency within the doctoral learning community as well as the post-doctorate practice-based research agenda. This chapter focuses on an analysis of the current scholarship published since 2019 that has continued to examine the aspects of doctoral student voice, agency, and academic identity. Theoretical perspectives were drawn from the scholarship for the theoretical framework of situated learning theory to view how and why doctoral students specifically are able to move from the periphery of the doctoral learning community to center with agency.
... "Where do I begin and how exactly do I actually do autoethnography?" Before embarking on a self-as-subject autoethnographical study, doctoral researchers must distinguish, understand, and articulate their own researcher positionality (Throne et al., 2018;Throne, 2019). Researcher positionality describes both the researcher's worldview and also the position they have chosen or has been pre-determined for them in the proposed and specific research (Savin-Baden & Howell Major, 2013;Throne, 2019). ...
Chapter
For some doctoral practitioner-researchers, the methods used within autoethnography and other self-inquiry based research methods are appropriate for a practitioner dissertation as the phenomenon of inquiry is a central human, intrinsic, and experiential self-focused construct. The tenets of autoethnography and other self-as-subject research support the view that new knowledge can be discoverable from within the individual lived experience and this chapter presents current trends and scholarship for the use of autoethnography and other self-inquiry research methods for practice-based doctoral research. The chapter also presents one case from a recent doctoral autoethnographer to illustrate the experience of a practice-based autoethnographic dissertation study within a practitioner doctoral program.
... Likewise, researcher positionality and a doctoral researcher's stance as insider/ outsider to the practice-based research focus is filled with implications due to the focus of the inquiry and the reason the focus was selected by the emerging doctoral scholar-practitioner (Shaw Howe, Beazer, & Carr, 2019). In prior work, the author and others have noted this researcher positionality for doctoral practice-based research may also influence the method of inquiry and the type of analysis selected or even the choices a scholar-practitioner may make to engage the practice-based research setting (Throne & Bourke, 2019;Throne et al., 2018). Numerous past researchers have noted the impact practitioner doctoral programs and the graduates of these terminal degree programs have on various educational contexts (Bartlett et al., 2018;Fillery-Travis & Robinson, 2018;Kennedy et al., 2019). ...
Chapter
This chapter presents researcher positionality within the specific context of practitioner doctoral research or practice-based research. The explication of researcher positionality is an essential precursor to practitioner doctoral inquiry for scholar-practitioners and can serve as a key anchor and measure for the scholar-practitioner’s journey as new investigator and entrance to the scholarly academic community. The chapter also describes how the use of reflexivity may enhance fidelity of researcher positionality within practice-based doctoral research that informs professional practice. In addition, considerations and illustrations are offered for the evaluation and articulation of researcher positionality within the practitioner doctoral research journey that draws on the insider-outsider role of the scholar-practitioner as new researcher and seasoned practitioner.
... "Where do I begin and how exactly do I actually do autoethnography?" Before embarking on a self-as-subject autoethnographical study, doctoral researchers must distinguish, understand, and articulate their own researcher positionality (Throne et al., 2018;Throne, 2019). Researcher positionality describes both the researcher's worldview and also the position they have chosen or has been pre-determined for them in the proposed and specific research (Savin-Baden & Howell Major, 2013;Throne, 2019). ...
Chapter
For some doctoral practitioner-researchers, the methods used within autoethnography and other self-inquiry based research methods are appropriate for a practitioner dissertation as the phenomenon of inquiry is a central human, intrinsic, and experiential self-focused construct. The tenets of autoethnography and other self-as-subject research support the view that new knowledge can be discoverable from within the individual lived experience and this chapter presents current trends and scholarship for the use of autoethnography and other self-inquiry research methods for practice-based doctoral research. The chapter also presents one case from a recent doctoral autoethnographer to illustrate the experience of a practice-based autoethnographic dissertation study within a practitioner doctoral program.
Article
Full-text available
Through this article, the author provides a reflection on the role of positionality in research, following the completion of a qualitative research project. Through the research project, the White researcher sought to explore the ways in which students of color experience a predominantly White university. Drawing on literature and findings from the research project, the author highlights potential challenges and opportunities of being cognizant of one’s positionality. These reflections illustrate the significance of positionality and serve as a reminder of its potential effects on the research process, as well as on participants and the researcher. The manuscript concludes with recommendations for researchers to carefully consider the potential influence of their positionality in any research setting.
Conference Paper
Full-text available
At United States online doctoral institutions, many doctoral candidates focus their dissertation research on study problems that emerge from professional practice, which may serve as a vital first experience and preparation for continued practitioner or practice-based research. Although there have been many definitions offered as to what constitutes workplace research, this scholarly reflection explores three essential considerations for duality (dual roles), positionality, and stance in a doctoral dissertation research problem originating from a doctoral candidate's workplace setting or professional practice. As a doctoral scholar with a dual role as a workplace professional and doctoral candidate, the doctoral candidate must often shift perspective and negotiate the concurrent dual or multiple identities of workplace professional, doctoral learner, scholar, and independent researcher. When accomplished, workplace dissertation research may also serve to evolve the candidate's enhanced perspectives, thereby preparing the candidate for continued practice-based research within the discipline that, in turn, may also expand the candidate's views and solutions to post-doc workplace problems. For this scholarly reflection, we defined dual roles, positionality, and stance within the practitioner and practice-based research literature, and further describe our reflections of the experiences as two recent doctoral graduates and our dissertation committee chair. We used Moustakas' critical self-analysis as a scholarly reflective mechanism in context with a critical review of the current literature to consider preparation for practice-based research through workplace dissertation research, and purport that these constructs need further exploration to better prepare doctoral candidates for practice-based research and to generate new knowledge during and following doctoral degree attainment.
Book
Offers guidance on defining rigorous and well-designed practitioner research for dissertation studies, demystifying the research study and clarifying its relation to and within the setting of professional practice.
The Situated Dissertation Advising Framework for improved doctoral
  • R Throne
  • B Oddi
  • C J Fore
  • C Akagi
  • L Bloomberg
  • M C Clowes
  • O'connor
  • J Duffy
  • B Riggle
  • St
  • L Louis
  • M Shaw
  • R Wardlow
Throne, R., Oddi, B., Fore, C. J., Akagi, C, Bloomberg, L., Clowes, M. C., O'Connor Duffy, J., Riggle, B., St. Louis, L., Shaw, M., & Wardlow, R. (2017). The Situated Dissertation Advising Framework for improved doctoral completion in a School of Education. 1st
The Situated Dissertation Advising Framework for improved doctoral completion in a School of Education
  • R Throne
  • B Oddi
  • C J Fore
  • C Akagi
  • L Bloomberg
  • M C Clowes
  • O'connor Duffy
  • J Riggle
  • B St
  • L Louis
  • M Shaw
  • R Wardlow
Throne, R., Oddi, B., Fore, C. J., Akagi, C, Bloomberg, L., Clowes, M. C., O'Connor Duffy, J., Riggle, B., St. Louis, L., Shaw, M., & Wardlow, R. (2017). The Situated Dissertation Advising Framework for improved doctoral completion in a School of Education. 1st Annual Conference on Academic Research in Education.