Research Proposal

A bridge for no man: Wildlife enforcement & applied social change

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Abstract

Abstract - This research briefing highlights wildlife coexistence as a growing social concern locally in British Columbia and globally. It argues that there are several destructive elements to current wildlife management practices and that many of these elements are rooted in tradition, colonialism, and the organizational culture of management processes; that there is a need for the development of ethical and moral wildlife policies. It is posited that, as the uniformed and armed public servants of the Crown, wildlife law enforcement agencies have a central place in seeking applied social change (i.e., a social change that has a practical purpose). It is contended that wildlife law enforcement records hold narratives that will assist in understanding dominant language, terminologies, and stories, which uphold and perpetuate social power structures within wildlife management processes. To that end, it is proposed that a critical discourse analysis of wildlife law enforcement records may contribute to a new body of knowledge regarding wildlife management practices and, hopefully, applied social change through the development of the state's moral and ethical relationship with wildlife under its custodial care.

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