Conference Paper

Spectrum Sensing and Collision with Primary Users in MIMO Cognitive Radio

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Abstract

Cognitive Radio Network is a form of communication where licensed frequency band of the Primary users (PUs) are made available to the Secondary user (SU) with constraint interference to the PUs. In this work, we have investigated a novel model considering interweave approach for spectrum access, with multiple primary users and single secondary user (SU). Multiple antennas have been considered at both the primary users as well as the secondary users. The activity of primary users are modeled as Poisson process. In addition, we also propose a new approach of sensing for a MIMO cognitive radio network using energy detection. The proposed method provides a closed form expression for probability of detection (P d) and probability of false alarm (P f) in a Multiple Input Multiple Output (MIMO) channel. Further, the throughput of secondary user as well as interference on primary users caused due to secondary user transmissions, has been computed for the proposed model.

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... The EEPA attained high energy efficiency than the existing power allocation method, but the energy efficient method was not applicable with the Femto cell network in spectrum sensing. Viswanath et al. [23] designed a model using interweave approach for spectrum access using different PU and SU. Different antenna was considered in both PU and SU. ...
... However, the system complexity may occur [25]. • In [23], a method on the basis of SVD of a channel matrix is devised based on the closed form expression for detecting energies in MIMO channel. However, the techniques required huge spectrum resources. ...
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Spectrum policy task force report, fcc 02-155
  • F C Commission
F. C. Commission, "Spectrum policy task force report, fcc 02-155," November 2002.