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It could be argued that one of the few unifying qualities all human beings share is the ability to appreciate beauty. While the object of beauty may change from one person to another, the awe and the thrill experienced by an enthralled beholder remains the same. Sometimes, this experience can be so overwhelming it can bring someone to the edge of existence. A very rare condition, known as aesthetic syndrome and, more commonly, Stendhal syndrome, entails a clinical phenomenon in which the presence of a beautiful piece of work or architecture causes dysautonomic symptoms such as tachycardia, diaphoresis, chest pains and loss of consciousness. We present an historical and clinical review of this condition.
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... The artistic experience of beauty can have strong emotional effects and can sometimes even lead to physical symptoms such as increased heartbeat, fainting, and chest nesvjestice i bolova u prsima. Ovo se stanje naziva Stendhalov sindrom (Palacios- Sánchez et al., 2018). ...
... U zapadnim kulturama poželjnije je da se prva riječ u naslovu, pains. This condition is called the Stendhal syndrome (Palacios-Sánchez et al., 2018). ...
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SAŽETAK: Ovaj pregledni rad u potrazi je za odnosom između vizualnih podražaja i emocija u kontekstu kulturnog turizma. Svrha mu je otkriti utjecaj vizualnih podražaja na emocionalno uzbuđenje (kulturnih) turista, a što se može primijeniti u kreiranju doživljaja. Rad se fokusira na dva mehanizma izazivanja emocija: psihološke čimbenike i umjetničke vizualne podražaje. Na početku rada analiziraju se teorije različitih afektivnih stanja u kontekstu turizma. Zatim se ispituje povezanost umjetničkih vizualnih podražaja (boja, oblik, simetrija, apstrakcija, složenost itd.) i emocionalnog uzbuđenja kulturnih turista. Posebna je pozornost posvećena boji koja se analizira pregledom različitih studija primjenom transdisciplinarnog pristupa s ciljem sistematizacije postojećeg znanja. Iako istraživanje nije donijelo zaključke o jasno definiranim odnosima između vizualnih podražaja i specifičnih emocija, primjena općenitih nalaza može pružiti veće razumijevanje mehanizama izazivanja emocija vizualnim podražajima i potaknuti daljnja istraživanja. Osim turizma, nalazi su primjenjivi i u drugim područjima. KLJUČNE RIJEČI: vizualni podražaji, kreiranje doživljaja, boja, emocije, kulturni turizam ABSTRACT: This review paper is in the search for connections among visual stimuli and emotions in the context of cultural tourism. Its purpose is to detect the role of the vision-related cues in (cultural) tourists' emotional arousal which can further be applied in experience design. We focus on two mechanisms of emotion elicitation: psychological factors and artistic visual cues. First, theory of different affective states is analyzed and is put in the context of tourism. Artistic visual cues' correlation with emotional arousal of cultural tourism consumers (color, form, symmetry, abstraction, complexity, etc.) are further examined. Special focus is on color through the review of different studies taking a transdisciplinary approach. The goal is to systematize the existing knowledge. Even though the research is inconclusive of clear relationships between visual stimuli cues and specific emotions, application of the generic findings, though, may provide greater understanding of the nature of emotion elicitation by visual cues and stimulate further research. Besides tourism, findings may be applicable in other fields.
... Both studies focused exclusively on spectators' knowledge, neglecting spatial factors and artworks' features. Stendhal Syndrome is one of the most important examples of the impact of art on an individual's emotional state [44,45]. It is a short-term exceptional combination of psychological and somatic symptoms that have been observed during visits to art galleries or travel to cities with stunning architecture, such as Paris. ...
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Social media is the most popular canvas to engage with art. In this study, we provide a different angle, on how an artistic installation on a world-renowned monument—such as Paris’ Arc de Triomphe—can emotionally affect viewers and potentially increase the popularity of the artwork. We collected N = 7078 Instagram and N = 3776 Twitter posts of the Arc de Triomphe as wrapped (installation) and unwrapped using APIs. As engagement indicators for several supervised machine learning experiments, we chose the total number of likes, comments, shares, text sentiment, and so on. Our findings revealed that people were captivated by the poetic installation. Based on the results, we discovered that the sentiments of triumph and surprise prevailed in datasets of the Arc de Triomphe as unwrapped. The same sentiments of triumph and surprise were most prevalent in datasets as wrapped, as well, but with higher scores. Furthermore, we have provided evidence of public art experience and engagement in the social media era. This research, we believe, will be useful in future studies of social media through the lens of public art and popularity. We hope that our findings will stimulate future research in the fields of art curatorship, cultural heritage management, marketing and communication, aesthetics, and culture analytics.
... How could one conceive of a subject's "return to baseline"? For example, what about cases triggered by traumatic experiences, such as a violent rupture or separation, or the case of Japanese tourists' extreme shock and disillusion upon visiting Paris, described as "the Paris syndrome" by Hiroaki Ota (see Palacios-Sánchez et al., 2018)? ...
Chapter
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Lamar Dodd was a 20th century American artist, the long-term director of the Lamar Dodd School of Art at the University of Georgia, and an arts advocate raised in LaGrange, Georgia. In the late 1970s after serving as a cultural emissary to the U.S. Department of State and as an artist for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Dodd explored the complexities and mysteries of cardiac surgery. The result of this artistic inquiry was The Heart Series, a profound collection of more than 50 works of art that explore the medical sciences and cardiothoracic surgery. This article reviews Dodd's artistic career and explores the ability of the visual arts to communicate scientific content and capture the transcendent elements of medical intervention. Special attention is paid to the unique relationship Dodd shared with his hometown community in LaGrange, the Wellstar West Georgia Medical Center, Robert Copeland (founder and long-term director of the Copeland Heart and Vascular Center at the Wellstar West Georgia Medical Center), and local philanthropist, Fuller E. Callaway, Jr.
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Aphasia is a frequent and devastating stroke complication that does not spare even great writers. In these cases, not only one of the highest cognitive functions is suddenly lost but also the act of bringing beauty into the world. Herein, we discuss the case of three writers who had to abandon their art compulsorily due to a cerebrovascular disease: Charles Baudelaire, Ralph Waldo Emerson, and Stendhal. They were magnificent writers, united by excellence in literature and an inevitable destiny that restricted their art to just a few words. They are also examples of the proximity of Neurology to Art, History, and Literature.
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A partir de los recuerdos de W.G. Sebald de la difteria que sufriera en su infancia, nace una discusión tanto sobre el origen de las clásicas descripciones clínicas como de las trampas que nos tiende la memoria, utilizando como ejemplo algunas vivencias de Stendhal, de quien también debemos desconfiar, dada su hipersensibilidad, que ha dado nombre a un síndrome psicosomático. Hombre más práctico, Mark Twain nos vuelve a la realidad con un gracioso relato sobre el terror que provocaba esta enfermedad a fines del siglo XIX, llevándonos a recordar las medidas de aislamiento y los tratamientos tópicos en la época inmediatamente anterior a la antitoxina, entre ellos la extracción manual de las pseudo membranas, maniobra que llevara a Marañón a interpretar erróneamente una pintura de Goya sobre una escena de "El lazarillo de Tormes".
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Stendhal’s syndrome occurs among travelers when they encounter a work of art of great beauty. It is characterized by an altered perception of reality, emotional disturbances, and crises of panic and anxiety with somatization. The patient profile described originally for this syndrome was of particularly sensitive individuals who were admirers of works or art: artists, poets, writers and art students, among others. The Russian writer Fyodor Mikhailovich Dostoevsky suffered from epilepsy and there is evidence that he presented the symptoms of Stendahl’s syndrome while contemplating some works of art, particularly when viewing Hans Holbein’s masterpiece, Dead Christ, during a visit to the museum in Basle.
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What happens when tourists scream with fear, shout with anger and frustration, weep with joy and delight, or even faint in the face of revealed beauty? How can certain sites affect some tourists so deeply that they require hospitalisation and psychiatric treatment? What are the inner contours of tourist experience and how does it relate to specific emotional cultures? What are the consequences of the emotional cultures of tourists upon destinations? How are differences in emotional culture mobilized and played out in the transnational contact zones of international tourism? While many books have engaged with the structural frames of tourist practice and experience, this is the first to deal with the emotional dimensions of tourism, travel and contact and the ways in which they can transform tourists, destinations and travel cultures through emotional engagements. The book brings together an international array of scholars from anthropology, psychiatry, history, cultural geography and critical tourism studies to explore how the movement to, and through, the realms of exotic people, wild natures, subliminal art, spirit worlds, metropolitan cities and sexualised 'others' variably provoke emotions, peak experiences, travel syndromes and inner dialogues. The authors show how tourism challenges us to engage with concepts of self, other, time, nature, sex, the body and death. Through a set of ethnographic and historic cases, they demonstrate that such engagements usually have little to do with the actual destination but rather, are deeply anchored in personal memories, repressed fears and desires, and the collective imaginaries of our societies.
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Background Jerusalem's psychiatrists expect to encounter, as the millennium approaches, an ever-increasing number of tourists who, upon arriving in Jerusalem, may suffer psychotic decompensation. Aims To describe the Jerusalem syndrome as a unique acute psychotic state. Method This analysis is based on accumulated clinical experience and phenomenological data consisting of cultural and religious perspectives. Results Three main categories of the syndrome are identified and described, with special focus on the category pertaining to spontaneous manifestations, unconfounded by previous psychotic history or psychopathology. Conclusions The discrete form of the Jerusalem syndrome is related to religious excitement induced by proximity to the holy places of Jerusalem, and is indicated by seven characteristic sequential stages.
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Marcel Proust is one of the most important French writers of the 20th century. His relationship with medicine and with neurology is possibly linked to the fact that his asthma was considered to be a psychosomatic disease classified as neurasthenia. Stendhal's syndrome is a rare psychiatric syndrome characterized by anxiety and affective and thought disturbances when a person is exposed to a work of art. Here, the authors describe neurological aspects of Proust's work, particularly the occurrence of Stendhal's syndrome and syncope when he as well as one of the characters of In Search of Lost Time see Vermeer's View of Delft during a visit to a museum. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.
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IntroductionTravelling, when searching for knowledge and emotion, can cause psychic discomfort that occasionally leads the traveller to seek medical attention. The psychiatrist Graziella Magherini described, in tourists visiting Florence, acute attacks including disorders of thought and affects, and even including, anxiety attack. She named it the Stendhal syndrome (SS) remembering the experience of the writer when visiting the Basilica of Santa Croce in Florence.
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An elderly artist developed a transient paranoid psychosis when on a cultural tour of Florence, a city of particular emotional significance to him. He has since had several milder relapses that quickly settle.
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Before the 19th century, there were travellers. There were even rich Englishmen doing the Grand Tour. But then, somewhere around the time of the French Revolution (or perhaps a little before it) feelings were let loose on the world. Back in 1761, readers had swooned when they encountered the ‘true voice of feeling’ in Jean-Jacques Rousseau’s novel La Nouvelle Heloise ; by the end of the decade, all of Europe was being sentimental in the manner made fashionable a few years later by Laurence Sterne in his A Sentimental Journey . Then there was Goethe’s novella, The Sorrows of Young Werther (1774), which made its author a celebrity and a visit to Weimar — where Goethe eventually ended up working as a civil servant (and bitterly regretted his youthful work) — a must for anybody with cultural pretensions. Everybody came to visit, including Napoleon, who reputedly carried a copy of the novel with him on his military campaign. And it was in Napoleon’s entourage that a young man from Grenoble, Marie-Henri Beyle, known through his writing as Stendhal, earned his spurs. He made his first acquaintance with Italy in 1800, when he crossed as a dragoon with the army of liberation over the Grand Saint-Bernard pass to fight the Austrians, and it was to remain his country of predilection. And he ‘fell’, as he put it, with Napoleon in 1814. After the Treaty of Fontainebleau, he settled for a while in Milan, and later in life was to be French consul at Trieste (then run by Austria) and Civitavecchia. Many of his greatest books are set in Italy, including his autobiography The Life of Henry Brulard (Brulard was one of his many aliases), which opens with the writer looking out from the Janiculum Hill with ‘the whole of Rome… from …