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A Conceptual System Dynamics Maturity Model of City Resilience

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Context: Maturity models offer organizations a simple but effective possibility to measure the quality of their processes. Emerged out of software engineering, the application fields have widened and maturity model research is becoming more important. During the last two decades the publication amount steadily rose as well. Until today, no studies have been available summarizing the activities and results of the field of maturity model research. Objective: The objective of this paper is to structure and analyze the available literature of the field of maturity model research to identify the state-of-the-art research as well as research gaps. Method: A systematic mapping study was conducted. It included relevant publications of journals and IS conferences. Mapping studies are a suitable method for structuring a broad research field concerning research questions about contents, methods, and trends in the available publications. Results: The mapping of 237 articles showed that current maturity model research is applicable to more than 20 domains, heavily dominated by software development and software engineering. The study revealed that most publications deal with the development of maturity models and empirical studies. Theoretical reflective publications are scarce. Furthermore, the relation between conceptual and design-oriented maturity model development was analyzed, indicating that there is still a gap in evaluating and validating developed maturity models. Finally, a comprehensive research framework was derived from the study results and implications for further research are given. Conclusion: The mapping study delivers the first systematic summary of maturity model research. The categorization of available publications helps researchers gain an overview of the state-of-the-art research and current research gaps. The proposed research framework supports researchers categorizing their own projects. In addition, practitioners planning to use a maturity model may use the study as starting point to identify which maturity models are suitable for their domain and where limitations exist.
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The manufacturing industry, one of the top consumers of natural resources, produces extensive carbon emissions that create the need for a sustainable manufacturing process, a topic of significant research interest. In the recent decades, the advancement of environmental technology and introduction of comprehensive environmental management systems have highlighted the intangible benefits of environmental management practices and their potential to drive organizational competitiveness. Accumulating evidence on the potential benefits of environmental protectionism has given rise to a series of environmental management practices and systems, such as energy informatics, environmental management standardization frameworks, and green supplier management and collaboration. However, existing literature lacks a clear conceptualization and a coherent theoretical framework of environmental management. In addition, no systematic framework exists for the design and implementation of environmental management practices that guide organizations in deciding on the practices or systems that they should implement given their organizational situations. Thus, this study aims to develop an energy and utility maturity framework for systematic measurement and management of natural resource consumption. Specifically, the proposed framework, energy and utility management maturity model (EUMMM), was designed based on the capability maturity model integration (CMMI). EUMMM has two major functions. First, it provides an assessment framework for analyzing the maturity level of energy and utility management in organizations. Second, it provides a progressive framework to guide organizational advancement in energy and utility management. A collaborative pilot study was conducted to validate the effectiveness, practicability, and convenience of the EUMMM. The results indicated that EUMMM successfully led the participating companies to move along the environmental management maturity path. Theoretically, this study extends the application of CMMI to the context of natural resource management and develops a progressive framework for energy and utility management maturation. Practically, this study provides a robust guideline for practitioners in analyzing and advancing energy and utility maturity levels to achieve a sustainable manufacturing process.
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Social media has opened up unprecedented new possibilities of engaging the public in government work. In response to the Open Government Directive, U.S. federal agencies developed their open government plan and launched numerous social media-based public engagement initiatives. However, we find that many of these initiatives do not deliver the intended outcomes due to various organizational, technological, and financial challenges. We propose an Open Government Maturity Model based on our field studies with U.S. federal healthcare administration agencies. This model is specifically developed to assess and guide open government initiatives which focus on transparent, interactive, participatory, collaborative public engagement that are largely enabled by emerging technologies such as social media. The model consists of five maturity levels: initial conditions (Level 1), data transparency (Level 2), open participation (Level 3), open collaboration (Level 4), and ubiquitous engagement (Level 5). We argue that there is a logical sequence for increasing social media-based public engagement and agencies should focus on achieving one maturity level at a time. The Open Government Maturity Model helps government agencies implement their open government initiatives effectively by building organizational and technological capabilities in an orderly manner. We discuss challenges and best practices for each maturity level and conclude by presenting recommendations.
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