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Cultural Hegemony in the United States

Authors:
  • Purdue University Northwest, Hammond, Indiana, United States

Abstract

This text is the first to present cultural hegemony in its original form - as a process of consent, resistance, and coercion. Hegemony is illustrated with examples from American history and contemporary culture, including practices that represent race, gender, and class in everyday life.
... Thus, for many, a person's appearance of normalcy carries assumptions there also is normalcy in ability to act according to autonomous free will and according to societal standards. Within a framework of hegemony, ideology, stories, narratives, and personal experiences (Artz & Murphy, 2000;Kleinstuber, 2014;Stoddart, 2007), our own personal history and visual clues influence how we categorize the person whose intent and free will are in question. Does the person appear closer to our folk beliefs of what is normal and consistent with "how the world works" (Amsterdam & Bruner, 2000, p. 111;Artz & Murphy, 2000) 14 and according to the best possible version of ourselves (Alicke, 1985;Beauregard & Dunning, 2001;Karpen, 2018), 15 or does the person appear closer to our own myths of the disabled, 11 Hart noted that, "[t]he social function which a criminal statute performs is that of setting up and defining certain kinds of conduct as something to be avoided or done by those to whom it applies, irrespective of their wishes." ...
... Within a framework of hegemony, ideology, stories, narratives, and personal experiences (Artz & Murphy, 2000;Kleinstuber, 2014;Stoddart, 2007), our own personal history and visual clues influence how we categorize the person whose intent and free will are in question. Does the person appear closer to our folk beliefs of what is normal and consistent with "how the world works" (Amsterdam & Bruner, 2000, p. 111;Artz & Murphy, 2000) 14 and according to the best possible version of ourselves (Alicke, 1985;Beauregard & Dunning, 2001;Karpen, 2018), 15 or does the person appear closer to our own myths of the disabled, 11 Hart noted that, "[t]he social function which a criminal statute performs is that of setting up and defining certain kinds of conduct as something to be avoided or done by those to whom it applies, irrespective of their wishes." See also Amsterdam and Bruner (2000) noting the focus on "what our culture designates as mattering" (p. ...
Chapter
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