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Abstract

Buku ini memuat diversity dan sebaran biota laut di Indonesia, mulai dari Protozoa, Plankton, Porifera, Coelenterata, Polychaeta, Krustasea, Moluska, Ekhinodermata dan Ikan. Selain itu, buku ini juga menekankan pada biota ekonomis penting yang ada.
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... Indonesia is the largest archipelagic country in the world consisting of 18,110 islands and an area of coral reefs in Indonesia about 18% of the world's coral reefs and has around 3000 species of reef fish (Suharsono, 2014). Coral reefs are massive deposits of calcium carbonate produced from coral animals with algae and other organisms, then produce calcium carbonate. ...
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