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Chinese herbal medicines for weight loss

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Abstract

This is the protocol for a review and there is no abstract. The objectives are as follows: To assess the effects of Chinese herbal medicines for weight loss. Primary objectives include: to examine whether or not Chinese herbal medicines (CHMs), including individualised CHMs and standard Chinese medicine formulae, for example Chinese Patent Medicine (CPMs) and standard Chinese herbal decoctions, are more effective than placebo, and as effective as other interventions used to treat obesity and achieve reductions in bodyweight; to describe the frequency and types of adverse events or adverse drug reactions (ADRs) for CHMs reported in the clinical trials identified and to compare these with data for comparison interventions. Secondary objectives include: to examine the effects of different CHM interventions (for example decoctions or CPMs, single Chinese herbs, CPMs with different ingredients) on treating obesity and overweight; to examine the effects of CHMs in different outcome measures (for example BMI, body fat distribution, mortality); to examine the effects of CHMs in different participant groups (for example different age groups).

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