ArticlePDF Available

Empowering local potential resources: strategies and challenges of vocational high school in East Java

Authors:

Abstract and Figures

The low interest of entrepreneurship in Indonesia can be seen from two factors, namely cultural and structural. However, it can be addressed through education, one of its strategy is through Vocational Entrepreneurship development program based on the potential of the region. This research seeks to see the readiness of SMK in developing entrepreneurship program in accordance with the potential of the region. The research approach uses Rapid Assessment Procedure (RAP) method. The research location is SMK in Tuban, Jember, Malang, Kediri and Pamekasan. The subject of the research is the managerial side of the school, including the curriculum development team, the School Committee and Vice Principals of Curriculum. The results of this study indicate that all principals already know about the potential of the region and have tried entrepreneurial development based on the potential of the area.
Content may be subject to copyright.
Journal of Physics: Conference Series
PAPER • OPEN ACCESS
Empowering local potential resources: strategies and challenges of
vocational high school in East Java
To cite this article: FX S Sadewo et al 2018 J. Phys.: Conf. Ser. 953 012149
View the article online for updates and enhancements.
This content was downloaded from IP address 181.214.125.188 on 06/02/2018 at 12:25
1
Content from this work may be used under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 licence. Any further distribution
of this work must maintain attribution to the author(s) and the title of the work, journal citation and DOI.
Published under licence by IOP Publishing Ltd
1234567890
The 2nd International Joint Conference on Science and Technology (IJCST) 2017 IOP Publishing
IOP Conf. Series: Journal of Physics: Conf. Series 953 (2017) 012149 doi :10.1088/1742-6596/953/1/012149
Empowering local potential resources:
strategies and challenges of vocational high school in East
Java
FX S Sadewo, 1 D Utami, 1,* P Handoyo1 and F Pribadi1
1Sociology Department, Faculty of Social Sciences and Law, Universitas Negeri
Surabaya, Ketintang Street, Surabaya 60231 East Java, Indonesia
diyahutami@unesa.ac.id
Abstract. The low interest of entrepreneurship in Indonesia can be seen from two factors,
namely cultural and structural. However, it can be addressed through education, one of its
strategy is through Vocational Entrepreneurship development program based on the potential of
the region. This research seeks to see the readiness of SMK in developing entrepreneurship
program in accordance with the potential of the region. The research approach uses Rapid
Assessment Procedure (RAP) method. The research location is SMK in Tuban, Jember, Malang,
Kediri and Pamekasan. The subject of the research is the managerial side of the school, including
the curriculum development team, the School Committee and Vice Principals of Curriculum.
The results of this study indicate that all principals already know about the potential of the region
and have tried entrepreneurial development based on the potential of the area.
1. Introduction
Based on the study of World Economic Forum, Indonesia's global competitiveness decreased by 4 (four)
ratings [1]. This is surprising because it happened in the era of Joko Widodo government. This
government is so concerned to improve economic capacity. One of them with infrastructure
development. Infrastructure development is used to attract investment from abroad. The results have
indeed shown an increase in the economy. This is shown in market drying, macro-economic
environment improvement, and financial development. This success was not followed by education and
health services, work-sharing efficiency, female labor participation, and lastly technological readiness
[2].
This low market share can indeed serve as an indicator that economic growth is not often with the
acceleration of investment. The development of investments in the macroeconomic sector is slow and
not in line with the opening of new jobs. Another thing that is not less important is the market share is
the quality of employment in Indonesia. The findings of World Economy (2017) show that Indonesia's
global human capital index (GHCI) is also low, which is ranked 64th just below Vietnam. This index
not only measures human development, but more on its implementation. The indicators are capacity,
development, deployment and know how of the human. This capacity variable is related to the level of
education as an investment, this development is related to the education of trained and untrained
workers. Deployment speaks of skill and accumulation applications at work age, and the last variable
know how is related to the number of skilled workers. The weakness of the workforce in Indonesia
turned out to be deployment and know-how. That is, Indonesia has low labor participation rate, high
unemployment rate, and very few skilled labor[3].
The low figure in GHCI turns out to be followed by the Global Entrepreneurship Index number. This
index is a continuation of the GCI (Global Competitiveness Index) combined with the Economic
Freedom Index (IEF) and the Ease of Business Index (EDB). As a result, Indonesia is ranked 90th, losing
to Vietnam (87), Philippines (76), Thailand (65), Malaysia (54), Brunei Darussalam (53) and Singapore
(24) [4]. Following Schumpeter's opinion, this low entrepreneurial rate has implications for economic
2
1234567890
The 2nd International Joint Conference on Science and Technology (IJCST) 2017 IOP Publishing
IOP Conf. Series: Journal of Physics: Conf. Series 953 (2017) 012149 doi :10.1088/1742-6596/953/1/012149
growth and employment recruitment. In fact, sectors developed on the basis of entrepreneurship at the
individual level, such as: micro and small business, have high absorption capacity.
This entrepreneurial ability can be trained, although some experts doubt it. Family and genetic
environment factors are far more influential [5]. However, some educational experts have shown that
entrepreneurship should be taught at various levels, including universities. In some countries,
entrepreneurship education is integrated into various levels of education. Another option is to
incorporate into vocational education. In Indonesia, there are two forms of vocational education. First,
education stands alone in the form of training, such as: coursework and training center. Second,
vocational education stands alone in the form of educational institutions, such as vocational high schools
and universities. In the United Kingdom, vocational education is integrated into the public high school
curriculum, although it is different between states (England, Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland). For
England (and Wales), and Northern Ireland, vocational education can be awarded at high school grade
2 in the form of courses that are integrated with the curriculum, while Scotland is implementing post-
school training. This in turn can reduce the number of unemployed, especially when applied at the time
of secondary education, moreover in the program the participants obtain certificates from the association
until the national certificate that makes it easy to seek work[6] It was done because of government
involvement, associations and companies.
There are other findings contrary to the case in Great Britain, in Germany the training program is
conducted post-secondary education or in those who do not continue higher education. The time is tiered
from 1-3 months, 6 months and 1 year. The result was no significant effect between the program and
the long waiting time in finding a job[7]. The program only fills the time for the unemployed. The
alleged cause is that no such qualification exists in the United Kingdom.
In Southeast Asia, the application of vocational education will vary. Its application depends on
political, social, cultural, economic and historical parameters. The failure of vocational education often
occurs because it is viewed as low education and for the poor, and is not taken seriously by the
government on the one hand, and its orientation is not directed to the socio-economic changes of its
people [8].
This happened in Indonesia in the Suharto government with the simplification of vocational
education and is only done at school level after 9 years of primary education [9]. Vocational education
post-primary education was only used to provide opportunities for students who could not continue to
college. Meanwhile, the public still appreciated to public high school. The percentage of vocational
education at the secondary and secondary levels is only 30:70. This lack of attention also resulted in the
absorption of vocational education school workforce. The unemployment rate of vocational education
has reached 11% of unemployment [10].
In the current era of regional autonomy, post-crisis monetary, the role of vocational education is
actually very important. In contrast to public high schools, vocational high school education teaches
entrepreneurship. Through entrepreneurship, vocational school graduates are able to capture
opportunities from their local potential. Businesses that they will build are no longer imported, but
derived from local potential. Therefore, a number of regional heads in East Java are struggling to develop
vocational high schools by beginning to eliminate the cost of education[11]. The next question is how
the vocational high school management effort in East Java develops local potential based curriculum.
His efforts do not simply change the curriculum [12] Or, just not develop learning methods[13].
2. Methodology
This research was a study that examines the policies and implementation of curriculum development
undertaken by the provision of vocational education. Development of the curriculum is one of the
strategies undertaken by the school in building students' readiness and entrepreneurship. This research
combines both quantitative and quantitative approaches, otherwise known as mix-methods. The mix-
method model used is Rapid Assessment Prodecdure (RAP), a method that combines critical in-depth
observations and interviews [14]. Data were collected from questionnaires and interviews. The subject
3
1234567890
The 2nd International Joint Conference on Science and Technology (IJCST) 2017 IOP Publishing
IOP Conf. Series: Journal of Physics: Conf. Series 953 (2017) 012149 doi :10.1088/1742-6596/953/1/012149
of the research was the managerial side of the school, including the curriculum development team, the
School Committee and Vice Principals of Curriculum.
For analysis, this research combined descriptive and qualitative quantitative analysis. Quantitative
was been used for analysing about the school's knowledge of local potential. This knowledge was
compared with data from local government. Qualitative analysis was aimed to look deeply at vocational
school management efforts looking at local potentials in the region.
3. Results and Discussion
3.1. Vocational High School as the consequence of agriculture industry.
In East Java, the regional potential are agriculture and industry sectors. These sectors is consequences
of its cultural ecology. East Java is divided into 3 (three) regions. That are coastal area, inland, and
island (Madura,etc). This coastal region is a drier region and adjacent to the sea. Therefore, its potential
is fisheries and agriculture. Despite less rainfall, some coastal areas are fertile areas for wetland farming.
This happens because the coastal areas into river estuaries, such as Bengawan Solo and Brantas River.
Table 1. Matrix of Vocational Development based on Regional Potency and Resources owned
Regency Regional Potential VHS Status Capital . Human The leading Majors
Malang
Raya
Agriculture &
Plantation, farming,
fishery, automotive
industry (Karoseri)
Sng Public Surplus Surplus Technology of Agriculture &
Fishery and Outomotive
Trn Public Surplus Surplus Technology of Agriculture &
Fishery
Pjn Public Surplus Surplus Tehnology ofAgriculture &
Farming
Tuban Fishery, Industry 1Tb Public Surplus Surplus Building, Industry &Informaticss
2Tb Public Surplus Limited Culinary & Fashion
AN Private Limited Limited Technology of Informatics dan
Accounting
KPel Private Surplus Surplus Fishery
Pamekasan Salt industry 1Pm Public Surplus Limited Technology of Informatics &
Commerce
2Pm Public Surplus Limited Technology of Informatics &
Otomotive
3Pm Public Limited Limited Tourism dan Informatics
Kediri Agriculture,
Farming, Industry
based on
Agriculture
Nga Public Surplus Surplus Culinary, Building & Outomotive
Pkn Public Surplus Surplus Agriculture & Farming
CBi Private Limited Limited Outomotive, electricity & Building
PHp Private Limited Limited Offices dan Accounting
Jember Agriculture,
Farming, Industry
based on
Agriculture
1Jb Private Surplus Surplus Accounting, Technology of
Informatics
4Jb Private Limited Limited Accounting, Technologi of
Informatics
Kar Private Limited Limited Accounting, Marketing&
Multimedia
PGur Private Limited Limited Outomotive
In 1870, the Dutch colonial goverment issued the law of economic liberation (Agrariche Wet). Under
the law, private plantations were allowed to invest. As a result, in the late nineteenth and early 20th
century, sugar and tobacco plantation was introduced at the coastal area and several are of inland.
Tobacco was also introduced to Madura region. But, a long time ago before Dutch colonial era, on
Madura, especially Pamekasan and Sumenep, the people produced salt. Meanwhile, in inland which
4
1234567890
The 2nd International Joint Conference on Science and Technology (IJCST) 2017 IOP Publishing
IOP Conf. Series: Journal of Physics: Conf. Series 953 (2017) 012149 doi :10.1088/1742-6596/953/1/012149
have mountain, higher rainfall and fertile soil, rural communities develop rice field. But, same as Madura
and coastal, the crop plantation was introduced. The crops were tea, coffee and chocolate. Sugar and
tobacco plans was conducted int lowlands and coastal areas of Southern Java. . As a consequence of the
development of plantations, a number of cities in coastal and inland such as Surabaya, Gresik, Pasuruan
and Probolinggo, Madiun and Jember were established plantation processing plantation factories
Consequently, the vocational education has been developed since the Dutch colonial government. In
1906 the Dutch colonial government designed an educational network from village to city with a
distinction for the indigenous and the Europeans. Indigenous educational institutions designed
established industrial and commercial center areas. For Europeans, schools were established in urban
areas. After basic education (grade 6), indigenous people directed vocational education. This vocational
education meets the needs of society (industry), namely: nurse, teacher and technique. In turn, the
government also organizes education to become an employee (ambtenaar)[15].
It is increasingly seen in the direction of vocational high school development. This study shows that
there are three vocational study programs developed by VHS management, namely: agriculture and
plantation (22.89%), services (21.69%) and trade (20.48%). They also developed vocational education
for tourism (13.25%), agricultural processing industry (9.64%) and mining industry (7.23%). In
recognition of the manager, the potential of the region became the main reason in developing its
vocational study program (41.46%). There is also a potential area as only one consideration alone
(39.02%), other considerations are public interest, socio-economic conditions of learners and the ability
of teachers. The latter two things become very important because it will impact on financing.
3.2. Strategy for Improving Curriculum and Branding Vocational School.
The development of this vocational school is full of challenges. For Indonesia, Adreas Schleicher (2005)
has pointed out various problems in vocational education, ranging from public interest, private sector
involvement, government attention to funding. Therefore, he suggested that central and local
government should have special attention to Vocational High School (VHS). In addition, the private
sector must also be involved in the development of vocational schools in the region [16]. This suggestion
is very important for the people of East Java. In contrast to other provinces, the number of VHS (1,975)
is higher than the General High School (GHS) (1,566), as well as the students who have reached
701,029. Compared to the national level, the number of open unemployed VHS graduates is smaller
than the GHS, namely: 166,572 and 276,806 [17].
Table 2. Pattern of Program and Curriculum Development VHS in Four Regency, East Java
No.
A
nswer options f %
A. Basic of Curriculum Establisment
1 The scarcity of study program in the region 5 8.20
2 Public interest 21 34.43
3 Analysis of local potential of regencies / municipalities 23 37.70
4 Technological developments that occur at this time 17 27.87
B. Referral Curriculum
1 Education Office Regency Field of Vocational Secondary School
(Dikmenjur)
10 15.63
2 SMK Public / privat curriculum developer who first stands 9 14.06
3 Experts from public/private college in Vocational Education 8 12.50
4 Professional Organization related to study program 16 25.00
5 Industrial Entrepreneurs associated with the study program 21 32.81
However, when looking at table 1 and answers to questions about the superior course, the manager
actually faces various problems. In Jember, for example, they did not develop plantations because of the
complex bureaucracy of plantation companies. "Although our place is in plantation area, but the
5
1234567890
The 2nd International Joint Conference on Science and Technology (IJCST) 2017 IOP Publishing
IOP Conf. Series: Journal of Physics: Conf. Series 953 (2017) 012149 doi :10.1088/1742-6596/953/1/012149
plantation here is managed by Public Plantation Company. For access to it almost all vocational
difficulties. For apprentices only, must be permit to Surabaya. And, rarely do they recruit employees.”
Or, “private VHS have difficulty funding to build a laboratory. The economic background of the students
is very low.” This is different from state VHS fully funded by the government, including teacher salaries
and administrative staff.
Figures 1. Empowering Regional Potentional for High Performance of Vocational Program
Table 2 shows how the management strategy in developing the curriculum of its superior program.
They also strive to engage industry entrepreneurs at the local level. In addition to academic reasons,
they hope that local industry employers can send their employees to become teachers. In addition, they
can use it as a laboratory, place of apprenticeship and workplace for graduates. This way is done by the
manager of Private Vocational School. School based management strategy is very important to introduce
its [18]. The success of attracting industry entrepreneurs has become a branding for VHS (see Figure 1).
Indeed, this kind of branding is a by-product of curriculum implementation needs, unlike that of a
vocational school administrator in Taiwan [19].
4. Conclusion
Developing vocational education is a strategic step to improve the quality of human resources. This is
done by regency/city and provincial governments. Nevertheless, from the results of this study,
vocational education remains oriented to regional potential, ranging from natural resources, industrial
and business networks, to local government networks, although it can not be denied to observe the public
interest. The condition of VHS in East Java, especially in these four regency, differs from the sources
owned. Ownership of these sources determines the strategy and choice of courses that are made superior
by the VHS. In VHS, surplus human resources and other capital can develop a study program that is
oriented to various regional potentials. In addition, the study program in turn has a better branding. This
condition is contrary to VHS which is less than human resources and other capital.
5. References
[1] Hanouz M D, Baller S and Browne C 2016 The Global Competitiveness Report 2016–2017 ed K
Scwab (Geneva: the World Economic Forum)
[2] Investments I WEF Competitiveness Report 2016-2017: Indonesia falls to 41st
[3] Forum W E 2017 The Global Human Capital Report 2017. Preparing people for the future of
work. vol 2014, ed K Schwab (Geneva: World Economy Forum)
[4] Ács Z J, Szerb L, Autio E and Lloyd A 2017 Global Entrepreneuship Index (Washington, D.C.,:
Resources
Economic
capital
Social
Capital
Cultural
Capital
Local
Government
High Quality
Performance
Low Quality
Performance
Natural
Potential
SURPLUS
MANAGEMENT
OF VOCATIONAL
HIGH SCHOOL
Vocational
Programme&
Branding
Industry &
Business
Polythenic
and Univ.
LIMITED
6
1234567890
The 2nd International Joint Conference on Science and Technology (IJCST) 2017 IOP Publishing
IOP Conf. Series: Journal of Physics: Conf. Series 953 (2017) 012149 doi :10.1088/1742-6596/953/1/012149
The Global Entrepreneurship and Development Institute)
[5] Forber D P 2017 “Born, Not Made” and Other Beliefs About Entrepreneurial Ability The Wiley
Handbook of Entrepreneurship ed G Ahmetoglu, T Chamorro-Premuzic, B Klinger and T
Karcisky (Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons Ltd) pp 273–91
[6] Codie N and Leney T 2005 Vocational education and training in the United Kingdom. Short
description. (Luxemburg: Office for Official Publications of the European Communities)
[7] Hujer R, Thomsen S L and Zeiss C 2004 The Effects of Vocational Training Programmes on the
Duration of Unemployment in Eastern Germany. Discussion Series
[8] Tilak J B G 2002 Vocational Education and Training in Asia 40
[9] McMahon W W and Jin H J 1989 Vocational and Technical Education in Indonesia: Theoretical
Analysis and Evidence on Rates of Return 1–44
[10] Group O B 2017 Indonesia recruits industry leaders to strengthen vocational education..pdf
[11] Sholikah B S 2016 Risma: Sekolah di SMK Banyak Keuntungannya http://www.republika.co.id 1
[12] Munastiwi E 2015 The Management Model of Vocational Education Quality Assurance Using
“Holistic Skills Education (Holsked)” Procedia - Soc. Behav. Sci. 204 218–30
[13] Mustapa M A S, Ibrahim M and Yusoff A 2015 Engaging Vocational College Students through
Blended Learning: Improving Class Attendance and Participation Procedia - Soc. Behav. Sci. 204
127–35
[14] Beebe J 2004 Rapid Assessment Process Enc Soc. Meas. 0 1–17
[15] Teeuwen D and Doorn H 1940 Education in the Netherlands East-Indies 1–13
[16] Schleincher A 2015 Reviews of National Policies for Education Education in Indonesia Rising to
the Challenge ed A Schleincer (Paris: OECD Publishing)
[17] BPS Jawa Timur 2017 Provinsi Jawa Timur dalam Angka. Jawa Timur Province in Figures 2017
(Surabaya: Badan Pusat Statistik Provinsi Jawa Timur)
[18] Bandur A 2012 School-based management developments and partnership : Evidence from
Indonesia Int. J. Educ. Dev. 32 316–28
[19] Hung Y and Fu C 2010 Brand management model of vocational high schools in Taiwan
Procedia- Soc. Behav. Sci. 2 4229–33
Acknowledgment
The team of authors would like to thank the Research and Development Agency (Balitbang) East Java
Province, especially Mr. Supriyanta and Mr. Irtanto, also to the informants and respondents. It is a great
joy to know the difficulties and expectations in developing vocational education.
... Although the management strategy for empowering vocational high schools has been well implemented, its implementation still has obstacles. Inappropriate replacement of principals can lead to extreme school management strategies because replacement principals have special programs (Ichwanto et al., 2020;Sadewo et al., 2018;Stevani, 2015). In addition, changes in leadership style also have a significant effect on strategic management performance in empowering vocational high schools (Fathoni et al., 2019;Grubb, 2006). ...
... Limited collaboration with industry regarding programs in vocational high schools has resulted in limited opportunities for schools to place students for internships in the industrial world (Faculty et al., 2018;Marsono et al., 2019;Sadewo et al., 2018;Ubaidah et al., 2021). So the opportunity to improve walking skills is less than optimal. ...
Article
Full-text available
Internship is a stage of education in Vocational High Schools that trains students to adapt to the business world and practice the competencies they learn in school directly in the industrial world. But unfortunately, not all vocational students who take part in internship programs in the industrial world can be well received. This study wants to look more deeply into how strategic management empowers Vocational High Schools in preparing students for the internship. This research uses mixed methods, more specifically the Embedded Design. Samples were taken randomly as many as 61 teachers and 353 students using the random sampling technique. Through SPACE Matrix analysis, it is known that the appropriate strategy in developing schools is to support an aggressive approach, namely by implementing the SO (Strategy to use power to reach opportunity) strategy. So it can be explained that the profile of Vocational High School 1 Kademangan is stable and can continue to prepare internship students with plans to take advantage of existing opportunities to improve the quality of education.
... The upcoming investors, both foreign and local investors, which bring brand-new technologies find it difficult to recruit proficient new employees in Indonesia (Sadewo et al., 2018). It is caused by the limited number of qualified and proficient human resources who are ready to be employed. ...
Chapter
Full-text available
The claim that “entrepreneurs are born, not made” captures the idea that entrepreneurial ability is largely determined by a person's inborn characteristics. Despite longstanding scholarly interest in assessing the validity of this claim, the belief that entrepreneurial ability is inborn remains largely unexamined. This is unfortunate, because many people around the world hold this belief even though the belief itself is inconsistent with contemporary social science. In an effort to advance research in this area, this chapter reviews recent social psychological research on lay theory and, in particular, on the concept of “essentialism,” the idea that members of large social groups possess an underlying set of immutable characteristics. Extending those ideas, the chapter applies them to the case of occupational groups and introduces a construct to capture the belief that entrepreneurs possess an underlying essence that is fixed and inborn. It goes on to explain how this belief is likely to affect important choices people make about the creation and management of new ventures. Taken together, these arguments expand scholarly conversations at the intersection of entrepreneurship and cognition by raising new questions about how and with what effects people think about entrepreneurial ability.
Article
Full-text available
This research is conducted to formulate an education quality assurance management model, which focused on vocational schools or SMK. The model covers an early process of students deciding to choose a certain SMK until the post graduation of students. Quality assurance is an important aspect to improve in education, especially in SMK, which is expected to be the leading efforts to increase human resources. Therefore, a special management model form of quality assurance toward SMK is needed. Holistic Skills Education (HOLSKED) is one of its manifestations which is designed to assure the quality of SMK in a simple way by doing six steps. They are Pre-entering Behavior, Entering Behavior, Process, Assessment, Evaluation, and Output which included in the early process during the student's application until the process of assuring students after half a year of graduation. This research applied Research and Development approach. The method used in the data collection process is qualitative and quantitative ones. The number of the samples is four SMK in which each has sixty-one people. Three SMKs are used as the samples for the initial test, while the rest is for the model test. There are four ways used in the data collection techniques, they are documentation, observation, interview, and questionnaire. HOLSKED resulted in some improvement of SMK's quality: HOLSKED could change the mind-stream of the majority of students to be more creative and productive, students do not depend on the available facilities, but on the contrary they try to find the way to solve the lack of the facilities at their school, and normative and adaptive materials are presented more practically, not theoretically, by the teachers. HOLSKED is an education quality assurance management model which is constructed scientifically because it is a model of quality assurance for SMK. In 1999, the National Education Department launched a supplement of Competency Based Training (BCT), in which it is an amalgamation of knowledge, skills and attitudes. The SMK graduates should have competency related to computer and intrepreneurship. The first competence is to anticipate the era of globalization, while the second is to develop the sipirits of entreprenurship which can create the jobs. The results of this model prove effective, especially to develop the mindset and awareness of the students to gain special expertise. This model can encourage vocational students to develop entrepreneurial ideas so that graduates are capable of not only working in a company but also creating their own businesses. The aspects developed through this model are mindset, independence, problem solving, innovation, and entrepreneurship.
Article
Full-text available
Perfection is difficult to achieve if one is teaching knowledge skills to the students in Vocational College for their time courses using the conventional learning methods currently practiced. Blended learning combines two methods for e-learning and also face-to-face inside or outside the classroom. Previously, the students had undertaken a traditional face-to-face classroom delivery for a module on teaching and learning. Attendance for the lectures was poor and interaction between the lecturer and students was limited. Using the collaboration concept of the " sharing is caring " which is the potential a student can achieve given the guidance of a teacher and the collaboration of others, the module focused the learning sessions on scenarios where students worked in groups to achieve an answer to the problems within the scenarios. The core of the module is an e-learning package on mentorship in vocational learning which is named " Voc-Learning ". Built around this are a series of face-to-face group work sessions, short lectures, web application and an online reflective discussion using Web 2.0 technologies. Some of the applications that were utilized in Web 2.0 have been explored but not much research has been done in the vocational field.
Article
Full-text available
The purpose of this study was to probe brand management at vocational high schools in Taiwan using a goodness-of-fit model to understand the applicability structural and practiced currently model among the different types of them. 1620 teachers and students were randomly selected from public and private vocational high schools in Taiwan. The findings were: The scales had good reliability and validity, and a good model fit; the dimensions of brand planning and brand marketing at vocational high schools had a positive impact on brand equity; this structural model was applicable to different school types; all dimensions of interviewee's operational perceptions reached an ideal level.
Article
School-based management (SBM) with devolution of authority and responsibility to school level decision-makers has become the most prominent feature of public school management systems in most countries around the world. This article provides the global trends and current developments in SBM in Indonesia with an emphasis on how SBM has created partnership and participatory decision-making processes in school level. The data reported here are on the basis of an empirical survey involving 504 school council members from Ngada Flores followed by 42 interviews with all relevant stakeholders.
Article
This paper focuses on the effects of vocational training programmes on the duration of unemployment in Eastern Germany. We use information from administrative data of the Federal Employment Office. To allow for observable and possible unobservable influences we apply a multivariate mixed proportional hazard model. Furthermore, particular interest is spent on possible locking-in effects by separate estimation of in- and after-programme effects. Regarding several different programme durations our results show insignificant in- and after-programme effects for short-term programmes, insignificant in-programme and negative after-programme effects for mid-term programmes and negative in- and afterprogramme effects for long-term programmes.
Article
this document. It has been delayed in order to include some of the changes announced earlier this year, but nevertheless has been written at a time when the impact of these changes is not clear. We think they have succeeded in providing a clear and succinct picture of a system which, in many ways and for some time, has been in a process of continuous change. We hope that readers share our view.
Preparing people for the future of work
  • W Forum
Indonesia recruits industry leaders to strengthen vocational education
  • O Group
Group O B 2017 Indonesia recruits industry leaders to strengthen vocational education..pdf