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Abstract

Volgens gangbare inzichten zijn beroepshiërarchieën wereldwijd en historisch sterk gelijkend (de ‘Treiman constante’). In dit paper onderzoeken wij of een landspecifieke schaling (SRSEI) van 39 beroepsgroepen in een in Suriname in 2011-2013 gehouden nationale survey (N=3929) afwijkt van de gangbare internationale schaling (ISEI). Wij vinden drie markante uitzonderingen op de Treiman regel: goudzoekers, hosselende markt¬verkopers en kostgrond¬bewerkers. Echter, alleen wat betreft kostgrond¬bewerkers is een Surinaamse schaling echt een verbetering. Voor marktverkopers gaat het om een classificatiefout en voor goudzoekers is de internationale schaling beter. Voor de overige beroepen vinden we dat de meting van hun sociaal-economische status ca. 5%-9% verbetert door een Surinaamse schaling.

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