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Abstract

The search for decisive actions to remain below 1.5 C of global temperature rise will require profound cultural transformations. Yet our knowledge of how to promote and bring about such deep transformative changes in the minds and behaviours of individuals and societies is still limited. As climate change unravels and the planet becomes increasingly connected, societies will need to articulate a shared purpose that is both engaging and respectful of cultural diversity. Thus, there is a growing need to 'raise the temperature' of integration between multiple ways of knowing climate change. We have reviewed a range of literatures and synthesized them in order to draw out the perceived role of the arts in fostering climate transformations. Our analysis of climate-related art projects and initiatives shows increased engagement in recent years, particularly with the narrative, visual and performing arts. The arts are moving beyond raising awareness and entering the terrain of interdisciplinarity and knowledge co-creation. We conclude that climate-arts can contribute positively in fostering the imagination and emotional predisposition for the development and implementation of the transformations necessary to address the 1.5 C challenge.

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... Expectations and hopes are pointed towards the arts with respect to tackling the intangibility. Galafassi et al. (2018) 89 point out that many artists are already framing their engagement with environmental crisis through the ability of arts "to provide an accessible channel to connect with phenomena that are unpredictable, often difficult to comprehend and seem remote in time and space" (p. 75). ...
... I am interested to reach even beyond interdisciplinary collaboration and invite transdisciplinary and postdisciplinary 90 modes of thinking-making-doing. I imagine collaboration in research, in arts and in pedagogies … 89 The research by Galafassi et al. (2018) discusses the context of climate change. In this research, environmental crises are considered to be a wider network of interrelating crises, climate change being one. ...
... The proposition of Neimanis et al. (2015) inspires speculating on whether posthumanist EAE could serve as a site for worlding diverse environmental imaginaries. Arts and artistic practices are already considered generative for creating new imaginaries and imagining alternative possibilities (Bertling, 2013;Davis & Turpin, 2015b;Galafassi et al., 2018). The idea of imagining as a worlding practice, however, enables reorienting EAE away from the notions of the imagination as the creative capacity of an individual human towards imaginings that might unfold from collective thinking with others and material, embodied entanglements. ...
Thesis
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Art educators have already responded to eco-social challenges for decades by seeking to advance environmental awareness, sensitivity, eco-social justice, democracy, and cultural sustainability. These various approaches and conceptualisations are discussed in this doctoral dissertation as environmental art education (EAE). The dissertation investigates EAE with a focus on its philosophical-theoretical groundings. A comprehensive mapping of EAE literature highlights that despite EAE aims at challenging modern Western dualistic thinking, the applied humanist theories problematically reassert the separateness of the categories of human and nature. The dissertation discusses the limitations of traditional EAE as it does not seem to offer a means for questioning human exceptionalism (anthropocentrism). Particularly when living through ecological crises, EAE, which furthermore runs the risk of romanticising human-nature relations, appears inadequate. The research reorients EAE by engaging with posthumanist theories. It draws from the threads of environmental, critical, feminist, and educational posthumanist theories that decentre the human, unpack categorical divides through materialist and process-oriented ontologies, and intersect with decolonial, race and other critical theories. The methodology of the research is informed by the recent developments in post-qualitative inquiry, including multispecies and walking methodologies. The research puts posthumanist theories to work by developing and employing an experiment called becoming-with the forest. Through focusing on artistic thinking, and embodied, sensory, movement-based ways of knowing, the experiment aims at groping towards multispecies and material forest entanglements, provoking thinking-with others, and queering habitual responses and conceptions of subjectivity. Different aspects unfolding in the experiment are introduced through visual-textual stories. The experiment activated considerations concerning the recognising of vulnerabilities, difficulties of disturbing anthropocentrism, and complex responses to the enmeshment of nature and culture. These topics are discussed further with posthumanist theories, and their implications for EAE pedagogies are speculated upon. The research proposes generative potentials in art educational strategies for queering normative human-nature relations, acknowledging more-than-human agencies, and creating new stories of shared worlds beyond human mastery. It encourages focusing on complex material and multispecies entanglements and attending to their ethics and politics in arts and their education, and proposes practices that are critical-creative, experimental, open-ended, transdisciplinary, and engage with multiple ways of knowing. These suggestions pave the way for exploring further the profound implications of posthumanist ontologies for subjectivities, pedagogies, learning, and the arts.
... Alongside this problem, the common perception of climate change as a geographically and temporally distant threat presents additional barriers to creating vivid, personally relevant, and affective images of climate change in the minds of publics (Nurmis, 2016). As a result, these challenges have led to increased artistic engagement with climate change which, over the past decade, has principally been framed as an accessible means of connecting people with phenomena that are both unpredictable and difficult to comprehend (Galafassi et al., 2018). Collaboration between artist researchers and scientists is not a new occurrence (Brown et al., 2017). ...
... In addressing the challenges inherent in art-science collaboration, it is clear that both the social sciences and humanities must be more strongly integrated with climate sci-ence research. Primarily, this call stems from the growing recognition that traditional dichotomous framings, such as those between fact and value, are of limited use in promoting understanding or engagement with contemporary environmental challenges (Galafassi et al., 2018). Alongside this, the way science is intellectually positioned within higher education needs to be evaluated. ...
... Accordingly, we argue that climate scientists not only need to move beyond the predominant use of deficit model communications (Illingworth et al., 2018), but those seeking to engage in arts-based climate communication need to critically evaluate the potential limitations of employing scientific framings of advocacy (Donner, 2014;Schmidt, 2015;Schmidt and Donner, 2017) in their own practice. In addressing both the need for climate scientists to explore the issue of climate advocacy and the requirement for new and exciting ways of engaging publics with climate change, we have argued that the arts provide an exciting opportunity for addressing current communication challenges (Nurmis, 2016;Galafassi et al., 2018). We suggest that climate scientist-artist researcher collaborations may provide social learning opportunities for climate scientists in order to transform their science communication practices. ...
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The climate science community faces a major challenge with respect to communicating the risks associated with climate change within a heavily politicised landscape that is characterised by varying degrees of denial, scepticism, distrust in scientific enterprise, and an increased prevalence of misinformation (“fake news”). This issue is particularly significant given the reliance on conventional “deficit” communication approaches, which are based on the assumption that scientific information provision will necessarily lead to desired behavioural changes. Indeed, the constrained orthodoxy of scientific practices in seeking to maintain strict objectivity and political separation imposes very tangible limits on the potential effectiveness of climate scientists for communicating risk in many contemporary settings. To address these challenges, this paper uses insights from a collaboration between UK climate scientists and artist researchers to argue for a more creative and emotionally attentive approach to climate science engagement and advocacy. In so doing, the paper highlights innovative ways in which climate change communication can be reimagined through different art forms to enable complex concepts to become knowable. We suggest that in learning to express their work through forms of art, including print-making, theatre and performance, song-writing, and creative writing, researchers experienced not only a sense of liberation from the rigid communicative framework operating in their familiar scientific environment but also a growing self-confidence in their ability and willingness to engage in new ways of expressing their work. As such, we argue that scientific institutions and funding bodies should recognise the potential value of climate scientists engaging in advocacy through art–science collaborations and that these personal investments and contributions to science engagement by individuals should be rewarded and valued alongside conventional scientific outputs.
... El arte permite entonces entender desde una perspectiva diferente las narraciones sobre las relaciones humanos-naturaleza. La investigación y las prácticas basadas en él se consideran enfoques prometedores para explorar las transformaciones hacia la sostenibilidad (Galafassi et al. 2018;Bentz et al. 2022). ...
... Las artes visuales facilitan la comunicación y complementan las formas de expresión escrita o verbal (Hensler, Merçon y Vilsmaier 2021;Holm, Sahlström y Zilliacus 2018). Además, permiten abordar la complejidad de las experiencias humanas, al facilitar la expresión de aspectos emocionales (Galafassi et al. 2018). Las artes son, por tanto, un método interesante para el encuentro entre la investigación y la acción en ciencias de la sustentabilidad (Heinrichs 2018;Saratsi et al. 2019). ...
... Siguiendo el argumento de Guilles Deleuze, el arte tendría un lugar central en la creación del pensamiento humano, en la expansión de las experiencias sensoriales (Levin 2013;Krtolica 2021), y en el reconocimiento de nuestras emociones (Galafassi et al. 2018). Se conoce que la investigación basada en las artes puede permitir abordar temas complejos como el manejo y la planificación de espacios protegidos (Hensler, Merçon y Vilsmaier 2021), sobre políticas de desarrollo sustentable de los pueblos indígenas (Zurba y Berkes 2014), sobre las posiciones de niños sobre temas ambientales (Barraza 1999), sobre el rango de valores y significados de los bosques (Edwards, Collins y Goto 2018), entre otros. ...
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La investigación basada en arte ofrece formas innovadoras de estudiar las relaciones humanos-naturaleza. En este artículo se presenta un estudio exploratorio con habitantes de la ciudad de La Paz, en Bolivia, usando dibujos como aproximación basada en arte, para entender cómo las personas valoran y se relacionan con las áreas protegidas municipales. Participaron 37 personas en un concurso de dibujo organizado por una de las áreas protegidas municipales. Los participantes representaron algún elemento (paisaje, especies) de las áreas protegidas que consideraron inspirador y reflejo de su importancia. La mayoría dibujó plantas o animales específicos locales, y expresó varias formas de valoración intrínsecas, instrumentales y relacionales. La investigación muestra que una aproximación basada en arte tiene potencial como herramienta investigativa, ya que permite revelar aspectos poco explorados de las relaciones humanos-naturaleza. Se concluye que los valores plurales y el conocimiento ecológico local a través del arte pueden proveer oportunidades para repensar el manejo participativo y la educación ambiental, y diseñar políticas hacia la sustentabilidad. / Arts-based research offers innovative ways to study human-nature relationships. We conducted an exploratory study with inhabitants of the city of La Paz in Bolivia, using drawings as an art-based approach to understand how people value and relate to municipal protected areas. Thirty-seven people participated in a drawing competition organized by one of the municipal protected areas where participants depicted some element (landscape, species) of the protected areas that they considered inspiring and reflective of the importance of these areas. Participants highlighted different protected areas; most drew specific local plants or animals, and they expressed various forms of intrinsic, instrumental and relational values. Our pilot study demonstrates how an arts-based approach has potential as a research tool, revealing underexplored aspects of human-nature relationships. We conclude that arts-based approaches can highlight plural values and local ecological knowledge, which provides opportunities to rethink participatory management and environmental education, and inform policy toward sustainability.
... Aesthetic practices in particular can contribute to deep emotional learning about sustainability that connects "hands, heart, and head" (Ivanaj et al., 2014). Through arts-based transformative learning, climate change represents an opportunity for more collaboration and innovation that can transform relationships with others and with nature (Galafassi et al., 2018a). ...
... This can then activate a desire to engage and contribute to alternative futures. As such, art can extend climate change engagement toward an affective, personal experience, creating a force that can help close the gap between what we know and what we do about climate change (Galafassi et al., 2018a). ...
... Engagement using creative, artistic practices is believed to have the potential to go beyond science communication and help people to overcome psychological barriers to thinking about the problem (Stoknes, 2015). It can also make climate change meaningful for people in quest of transformation (Galafassi et al., 2018a). Below, we discuss five ways that art can contribute to transformative learning for systems change. ...
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Young people represent a powerful force for social change, and they have an important role to play in climate change responses. However, empowering young people to be “systems changers” is not straightforward. It is particularly challenging within educational systems that prioritize instrumental learning over critical thinking and creative actions. History has shown that by creating novel spaces for reflexivity and experimentation, the arts have played a role in shifting mindsets and opening up new political horizons. In this paper, we explore the role of art as a driver for societal transformation in a changing climate and consider how an experiment with change can facilitate reflection on relationships between individual change and systems change. Following a review of the literature on transformations, transformative learning and the role of art, we describe an experiment with change carried out with students at an Art High School in Lisbon, Portugal, which involved choosing one sustainable behavior and adopting it for 30 days. A transformative program encouraged regular reflection and group discussions. During the experiment, students started developing an art project about his or her experience with change. The results show that a transformative learning approach that engages students with art can support critical thinking and climate change awareness, new perspectives and a sense of empowerment. Experiential, arts-based approaches also have the potential to create direct and indirect effects beyond the involved participants. We conclude that climate-related art projects can serve as more than a form of science communication. They represent a process of opening up imaginative spaces where audiences can move more freely and reconsider the role of humans as responsible beings with agency and a stake in sustainability transformations.
... Even though societies have produced a large amount of knowledge, our capacity to respond to these sustainability challenges is lacking (Glasser, 2018). The need to develop ways of knowing complementary to traditional, rational, linear, analytical, classificatory, and mechanistic knowing is urgent in order to promote transformative learning for sustainability (Kagawa & Selby, 2010;Lotz-Sisitka, Wals, Kronlid, & McGarry, 2015;Sterling, 2003Sterling, , 2010Wals, 2015) The arts are regarded as a powerful approach to transformative and transgressive learning (Lotz-Sisitka et al., 2015), as the arts can challenge taken-for-granted convictions, often in an engaging and creative way, and focus on personal experiences and meaning-making related to sustainability (Eernstman & Wals, 2013;Galafassi, Kagan, Milkoreit, Heras, Bilodeau, Bourke, Merrie, Guerrero, Pétursdóttir & Tàbara, 2018). Moreover, the integration of multiple ways of learning and the combination of cognitive, embodied, intuitive, and emotional awareness through the arts enable enlightening the qualitative complexity of sustainability issues and bridging the gap between abstract concepts of sustainability and subjective experiences (Eernstman & Wals 2013). ...
... Moreover, the integration of multiple ways of learning and the combination of cognitive, embodied, intuitive, and emotional awareness through the arts enable enlightening the qualitative complexity of sustainability issues and bridging the gap between abstract concepts of sustainability and subjective experiences (Eernstman & Wals 2013). In essence, the arts can address the complex issues of humanity and serve as collective and creative approaches to transformations to sustainability (Galafassi et al., 2018). ...
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In this article, we argue that drama can serve as an interconnecting method for climate change education. In this study, we elaborate the practice of drama and participation experiences through three drama workshops: 1) process drama work on the global, social, and individual aspects of climate change, 2) outdoor drama practice on relations to nature, and 3) reflections through drama practice. The human dimension of the sustainability issues, conditions of interdependence, and collaboration were explored and manifested through the drama practices, which created frames for embodied, creative and cognitive dialogues between people with different perspectives. Being differently-as experienced through the embodied, collective, and creative practices of drama-seemed to promote experiences of interconnectedness, widen perspectives of sustainability, and motivate acting differently.
... creative exchange and potentially for positive change. Songs are linked to ecological practice and the inevitable transformations that take place in social-ecological systems (Fernández-Giménez 2015; Galafassi et al. 2018;Yusoff and Gabrys 2011). ...
... The melodies, performative gestures, and contextual information, offered before and after singing, are significant sources for a greater understanding of how resources in the region are valued and used (Pretty 2011). Altogether, the songs and the rural settings represented offer evidence of the coupling of human and ecological well-being, as singers reference elements that support individual, community, and ecological health (Galafassi et al. 2018). Identifying how songs connect the perception, expression, and maintenance of well-being can reveal how Kazakh mobile pastoralists, whose livelihood and lifestyle are so closely tied to the land, engage socially in adaptive, supportive, and sustaining actions in relation to resources they rely on and care for at each seasonal site. ...
Article
In rural Mongolia, local ecosystems support many of the daily life needs of both human and nonhuman populations. Kazakh pastoralists in the westernmost province of Bayan-Ölgii, in Mongolia, have established complex relationships with the land. They not only rely on resources for their subsistence but, as ecosystem stewards, they maintain ecological knowledge that is tied to local and regional biodiversity. This study explores how Kazakh pastoralists use locally created songs to express both relationships with the land and a sense of well-being. The social settings for singing and the images in song lyrics that reinforce a sense of place and relationships with resources provide pathways for social transmission of knowledge. This is especially important during this period of ecological, economic, and social change in the region that has ruptured ecosystems and families. Kazakh pastoralists' musical practices linked to pasture resources and activities, resource diversity, and social-ecological resilience are also associated with social learning and coping with transformations that take place in social-ecological systems. The songs provide access to local ecological knowledge that may offer new approaches to understanding notions of more-than-human well-being for scholars working in collaboration with research partners in local and regional settings.
... While much has been written of the benefits of effective visualization for the communication of scientific research-and there appears to be some movement among scientific institutions to recognize the importance of storytelling and design-little has been published about the ways that designers and artists may participate in and contribute to the process of scientific knowledge generation within the framework of the scientific method (Board, 2018;Adam, 2020). This article builds on previous work by Galafassi et al. (2018) and Pereira et al. (2019) and explores the mechanisms by which design practice and artistic abstraction can be leveraged not just for improved communication but also for enriched production of scientific knowledge and stimulation of scientific imagination. Wetlands, as a transition biome, are an appropriate metaphor to describe the possibilities that arise from collaborations between artists, designers, and scientists. ...
... Noting the urgency of the climate crisis, this article describes a rich and rewarding territory for exploration, in which artists and designers can move climate scientists toward deeper insight and novel discovery in their pursuit of knowledge production, and can welcome the public into elevated scientific understanding of the climate crisis. The work described here was built on previous work by Pereira et al. (2019) and Galafassi et al. (2018) who also assert that the involvement of art and design in the scientific process can go beyond raising awareness and can participate in knowledge production. ...
Article
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As the climate crisis intensifies amid some persistent public denial of the science, there exists a necessary opportunity for scientists to engage in transdisciplinary collaborations, such as those with artists and designers, in an effort to both improve the communication of climate science, but also to bolster the production of scientific knowledge. We demonstrate how art and design can activate the human imagination and promote collaboration across disciplines in a way that the post-Enlightenment scientific endeavor has historically been unable to do and can provide a framework for developing sustainable solutions to the climate crisis. Here, we describe 2 studies that involved collaboration between artists and designers and climate scientists. The first study paired a team of designers and computer scientists with climate and atmospheric scientists from the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in an effort to (re)build an exploratory research interface for the Multi-Angle Spectroradiometer Plume Height Project dataset. This project not only produced an aesthetic visualization interface with highly improved functionality, but it also demonstrated how an improved interface can enable scientists to pursue more and “better” research hypotheses. For the second study, we worked with artists at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago to create three sonic-based art pieces that effectively communicated the science of climate change, appealed to human aesthetic judgment, and expanded the scope of our “ecological awareness.” We show that, while collaborations between artists and scientists are not necessarily novel, the integration of art, design, and science from a project’s inception can improve both the production of knowledge and constitute an entry point for regular people to understand and engage with their rapidly changing planet.
... Collaboration with the social sciences has been proposed as a way to expand the range of futures explored with IAMs [23,53,54]. We propose collaboration with the arts and humanities as an additional avenue to explore, since imagining low-carbon futures involves not just exploring technological and economic developments but transformations in our current beliefs and values as well [20,27,106,107]. Rather than a 'late phase communication device' of technical assessments [116], the arts and humanities have the capacity to explore futures beyond the quantitative conceptions of IAMs and to conceive of cultural changes necessary for humanity to respond to the climate crisis. ...
... In order to strengthen their connection to society, a combination of IAMs with more qualitative and experiential approaches could be a valuable area to explore, such as storytelling, visioning, speculative design and gaming [106]. Ideally, in a combined effort of IAMs with alternative approaches the analytical qualities of IAMs, such as their representation of complex global level interactions and credibility of quantitative information, will be maintained while optimally using the strengths of alternative approaches, such as qualitative, socio-cultural societal changes and experiential engagement. ...
Article
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Integrated assessment models (IAM) and resulting scenarios have become increasingly institutionalised and relevant in the science-policy interface of climate policy. Despite their analytical strengths to conceive low-carbon futures, their co-evolution with the transnational science-policy interface of climate politics has also led to a focus on a specific set of techno-economic futures that are typically based on a relatively narrow set of assumptions. This deviates attention from alternatives that are hardly studied by IAMs, but might be more desirable from a societal perspective. We argue that research-based models and scenarios should support rather than narrow down deliberations on possible and desirable futures and provide an impetus to enact socially desirable change. Accordingly, we propose three future directions regarding the development and use of IAMs: 1) incorporate a plurality of perspectives on plausibility and desirability through iterative participatory engagement and worldview-based scenario exploration, 2) seek collaboration with the arts and humanities to expand the range of imagined futures beyond the status quo and 3) make projected futures more tangible and experiential so that diverse societal actor groups can understand and genuinely engage with them. By deploying the indisputable analytical strengths of IAMs optimally within these suggestions, we believe they can facilitate broader societal debates about transformative pathways to low-carbon futures.
... Mckibben 2005), resulting in a profusion of projects. For a series of reviews, see (Johns-Putra 2016, Nurmis 2016, Hawkins and Kanngieser 2017, Galafassi et al 2018. However, simply applying creative storytelling to climate communication is insufficient. ...
Article
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By some counts, up to 98% of environmental news stories are negative in nature. Implicit in this number is the conventional wisdom among many communicators that increasing people's understanding, awareness, concern or even fear of climate change are necessary precursors for action and behavior change. In this article we review scientific theories of mind and brain that explain why this conventional view is flawed. In real life, the relationship between beliefs and behavior often goes in the opposite direction: our actions change our beliefs, awareness and concerns through a process of self-justification and self-persuasion. As one action leads to another, this process of self-persuasion can go hand in hand with a deepening engagement and the development of agency - knowing how to act. One important source of agency is learning from the actions of others. We therefore propose an approach to climate communication and storytelling that builds people's agency for climate action by providing a wide variety of stories of people taking positive action on climate change. Applied at scale, this will shift the conceptualization of climate change from 'issue-based' to 'action-based'. It will also expand the current dominant meanings of 'climate action' (i.e. 'consumer action' and 'activism') to incorporate all relevant practices people engage in as members of a community, as professionals and as citizens. We close by proposing a systematic approach to get more reference material for action-based stories from science, technology and society to the communities of storytellers - learning from health communication and technologies developed for COVID-19.
... Furthermore, novel methods rooted in psycho-social methodologies, revealing how people engage with and to energy and climate change, are also emerging (see Hoggett, 2019). Among other topics, there has also been special attention toward empathetic work, listening, collaborative conversations, art, expression and connectivity to nature (Galafassi et al., 2018). Research has also embraced new narratives: those that encourage more intelligent and sustainable engagements with "vibrant matter" that sustains our complexsocieties (Tainter, 2011), and those that are ever-so ambitious, to avoid a global carbon lock-in with catastrophic consequences for the most vulnerable of the planet. ...
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This perspective piece sets out to contribute to the academic and practitioner debates around energy transitions and democracy initiatives in the age of a climate crisis. For tackling present-day energy challenges in a democratic, equitable and just manner, critical social science and humanities research on meaning and materialities, new actors and narratives, values and democracy is indispensable. In doing so, we centralize our work around three fundamental axes: The Concept, reflecting on the energy itself and revitalizing its essence; The Political, embracing the value laden, political and gendered nature of energy, and recognizing citizens' initiatives as counter currents to centralized energy decision-making; and The People, anticipating the far right’s post-truth narratives that jeopardize planetary futures. We contend that “normative, political and embodied” research and praxis can serve for diversifying the energy transition debate as well as energizing bottom-up community led initiatives in order to democratize the energy playing field of recent times.
... Participatory visual arts projects can play a valuable role as we attempt to mitigate and navigate climate change impacts (Galafassi et al., 2018;Roosen et al., 2018). Through participatory visual arts we can build power through collective work, envision a different future, strengthen individual and collective resiliency, and invite emotional connection and engagement that can lead to both reflection and action. ...
Article
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Heritage tourism sites, historic sites, or museums of history or culture offer rich opportunities for critical engagement and informal learning. Informal learning consists of those educational opportunities that occur outside of the structured classroom setting, such as videos, self-guided tours, social media networking and book clubs. As two researcher-educators, we are interested in how these informal learning opportunities can influence attitudes and encourage questioning of societal norms. One of our recent research projects was to explore how we could inspire deep, meaningful learning while visiting a cultural site. We used a practice called ‘photo-elicitation’ to inspire critical reflection and cognitive growth. Photo-elicitation invites research participants to choose images that are pertinent to the study or theme, that are meaningful to them and that elicit reflection. In this piece we share our photo-elicitation approach that is based on critical feminist pedagogy, a theory that focuses on empowering learners through opportunities for questioning and reflection. While we have used this approach in a research context, our approach is also suitable for work with various adult groups in non-research contexts. The study we refer to in this contribution was with groups of pre-service educators or teachers who referred to our work at a local historic site as a “field trip.” By providing a context and guiding questions for photo-elicitation, we have turned the common field trip into an opportunity for deeper learning that can be used as research method or simply as an informal learning activity with any group of people.
... The humanities, arts and critical social sciences may support a robust response to questions over fossil fuel money in football in at least two ways. First, the arts have a vital role in drawing societal attention to the presence of financial arrangements that are not compatible with global climate obligations, and can provide a space where dialogues between different actors towards imagining transformative outcomes outside of the 'status quo' can happen (Galafassi et al., 2018). Second, areas of study such as applied philosophy and ethics can help to think through the breadth of ethical issues associated with fossil fuel financing, and may support clubs, leagues and tournaments in developing institutional policies for ethically-sound decisions on funding and sponsorship. ...
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Association football is popular and influential globally. Interest in how football relates to climate change, and the climate policy required for football, is growing. Clubs, players and fans increasingly call for action to reduce football’s impact on the climate, and for plans to adapt to climate impacts on football. However, well-intentioned actions must be underpinned by robust evidence. This synthesis reviews research at the interface of football and climate change. After summarizing the main climate actions identified for fans, players, clubs and organizing bodies, the review looks in-depth at four areas: impacts of football on climate; impacts of climate on football; football as a driver for pro-climate actions; and the relationship between football and carbon-intensive industries. The review then outlines research gaps for an evidence-driven response to climate change in football: adaptation across different geographical contexts; understanding what climate change means for community-level football; understanding how carbon-intensive industries relate to sense of place identity in football under a just transition; developing principles for phasing-out fossil fuel financing; and considering how climate change relates to women’s football. Key policy insights • Football is a forum for galvanizing societal action in support of climate policy. However, football also contributes to, and is impacted by, climate change, and hence requires policy support under a changing climate; • Reducing transportation emissions, especially flying, is a key climate policy requirement for football. Institutional policy, with government support, may enable more efficient scheduling and use of surface transport; • Institutional policies, and public health policies, should develop standards and guidelines for football under extreme heat. Football also ought to be integrated within local, regional and national climate adaptation policy to ensure climate resilience; • Clubs and players can lead by example on climate-positive actions, and energize wider action through fan bases. Alignment of initiatives with national or international climate policy may raise public awareness of climate polices and targets; • Institutional policies for clubs, tournaments and associations should regulate fossil fuel financing. Football also offers an avenue to understand relations between local identity and carbon-intensive industries, and thus to identify socio-cultural factors for regional just transition policies.
... This reality has stimulated critical reflection on practice and limitations in traditional disciplinary evaluation methods (e.g., Muller et al., 2015;van Mierlo and Beers, 2018) but also allowed space from reframing art-science intersections as 'shared encounters with politics and environmental change' (Gabrys and Yusoff, 2012). While there are two central themes that resonate within current art-science collaborative practice: (i) the ability to engage diverse publics (Gabrys and Yusoff, 2012;Lesen et al., 2016) and (ii) the ability to 'do' social, cultural and political work (Gibbs, 2014;Galafassi et al., 2018), there is evidence that expectations of artists and scientists may differ as a consequence of disparate training, methods, values, vocabulary, funding, and income (Lesen et al., 2016). If art-science collaborations are visualized on a spectrum, at the 'service mentality' end artists might take inspiration from science but not work directly with scientists, and likewise there might be scientists making art without direct contact with artists. ...
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There is a disconnect between ambition and achievement of the UN Agenda 2030 and associated Sustainable Development Goals that is especially apparent when it comes to ocean and coastal health. While scientific knowledge is critical to confront and resolve contradictions that reproduce unsustainable practices at the coast and to spark global societal change toward sustainability, it is not enough in itself to catalyze large scale behavioral change. People learn, understand and generate knowledge in different ways according to their experiences, perspectives, and culture, amongst others, which shape responses and willingness to alter behavior. Historically, there has been a strong connection between art and science, both of which share a common goal to understand and describe the world around us as well as provide avenues for communication and enquiry. This connection provides a clear avenue for engaging multiple audiences at once, evoking emotion and intuition to trigger stronger motivations for change. There is an urgent need to rupture the engrained status quo of disciplinary divisions across academia and society to generate transdisciplinary approaches to global environmental challenges. This paper describes the evolution of an art-science collaboration (Catching a Wave) designed to galvanize change in the Anthropocene era by creating discourse drivers for transformations that are more centered on society rather than the more traditional science-policy-practice nexus.
... These forms of communication, which may entail use of art, video, or design, move climate change education beyond the realm of equations, graphs, and data, requiring a capacity to integrate different ways of knowing and relating to different viewpoints. By incorporating climate change in the context of the Anthropocene into the broader curriculum, educators can present fresh perspectives that help students see a wider range of solutions and entry points for critical engagement (Galafassi et al., 2018;Wodak, 2018). ...
... This resulted in social change by rising local political and environmental awareness. Theories on environmental humanities that encourage the use of arts for rising environmental awareness to meet the climate change challenge point to the same direction (Art-COP21, 2019; Galafassi et al., 2018;Kim Sommer and Andreas Klöckner, 2019). In fact, a popular outcome of social movement actions is changing culture (Juris et al., 2014). ...
Article
Mushrooming opposition to coal mining and transportation in the United States (US) connects with both environmental justice and climate justice movements. Artistic expressions are part of the strategic toolkit of these movements. Art’s capacity to foster cultural, cognitive and psychological changes is amply recognized by academics as well as by public in general. Nevertheless, the theoretical question of how art is linked to activist strategies and to socio-spatial transformations in environmental conflicts remains unexplored. This paper contributes to filling this gap by examining the emblematic struggle to stop the construction of a coal-export terminal in Oakland, CA. Our data includes 32 in-depth interviews of activists, artists and legal experts linked to the conflict surrounding this coal-export terminal. Non-participant observation and secondary data collection helped to contextualize the interviews. The results offer a timeline of the movement, a map of artistic expressions, and network analyses around the effects of environmental artistic activism. We demonstrate that creative activism has critical relevance for facilitating engagement, education and outreach of the anti- coal movement. Arts and its spatial impact benefited the movement by expanding its scale and making it more inclusive regarding demographics, including particularly women and youth of color. The use of the arts raised environmental and political awareness and enhanced public participation in decision making. The paper connects the literatures of environmental justice, environmental humanities and human geography. We contribute to the yet underdeveloped dialogue discussing the capacity of art to influence socio-ecological structures and socio-spatial dynamics in cases of environmental justice conflict.
... Currently, technological developments seek to improve the properties of materials [1][2][3][4], with incorporation of other materials or biomaterials through different methods to increase their properties and make them more absorbent, resistant, flexible, etc., to be able to respond to the new environmental conditions of temperature, radiation and humidity, among others [5][6][7]. One of the problems with more repercussions is the increase in UV radiation. ...
Article
Scientific reports around the world indicate that solar radiation has increased its intensity and consequently its UV radiation, making it necessary to improve protective materials against this radiation. Textiles can be used as a protective material against the UV radiation, and one way to increase their UV protection capacity could be by adding biomaterials with optical absorption in the UV region. In the present study, flavonoids, natural pigments absorbing UV radiation, were extracted from corn seeds by using two methods (maceration and microwave oven assisted). The extracted flavonoids as well as a commercial protector of UV-B radiation were added to a cotton textile and then exposed to different UV-B radiation times (0 min, 30 min and 60 min). The optical absorption spectra of flavonoids and textile materials were obtained by photoacoustic spectroscopy. These spectra showed differences, observing that the textile added with commercial protector was degraded with the exposition of UV radiation; meanwhile in the case of the textile added with flavonoids increased its UV protection.
... Arts-based inquiry can transcend abstract, reductive, cognitive and verbalized knowing, as it mobilizes embodied cognition (i.e. kinaesthetics, the senses, emotions, intuitions, the subconscious and tacit knowing) and explores the space between what is known and what is not while allowing ambiguities or ambivalences, and activating reflexivity and radical imagination (Dieleman, 2008;Barone and Eisner, 2012;Savin-Baden and Wimpenny, 2014;Leavy, 2015;Bendor et al., 2017;Kagan, 2017;Galafassi, 2018;Galafassi et al., 2018b). Participatory arts-based formats for sustainability performatively engage participants in corporeal learning and embodied expressive explorations (Heras and T abara, 2014), generate alternative interpretations mobilizing tacit knowing (Galafassi et al., 2018a), combine imagination with open-ended experimentation to open up futures-oriented questions and perspectives (Kagan, 2019), and/or envision alternative ontological worlds (Maggs and Robinson, 2016). ...
Article
This paper describes and analyses the potentials and limits of Design Thinking in Sustainability Jams, claimed increasingly to contribute sustainability solutions and changed practices for desired futures. With an in-depth case study, we show how the current application of “Design Thinking” coming from the management context (where Design Thinking is deployed as a human-centred problem-solving approach) can impair the idea of a Sustainability Jam and where this event format must be questioned. Design Thinking and Jamming are found to offer promising tools and frameworks to generate possibilities for sustainable futures, yet the case study demonstrates how this potential is squandered. Our empirical results point to several limitations in the practice of a sustainability jam: User-orientation, the use of personas and prototypes, insufficient complexity and insufficient embodiment hinder the potential of design thinking to foster social creativity and to address wicked problems of sustainability. We suggest directions in which to understand and eventually overcome these limitations, toward redesigning sustainability jams in order to better fulfil their promises.
... In a similar vein, Thomsen (2015) describes using photographs to develop emotional connections with landscapes and human and nonhuman species impacted by ecological change. Galafassi et al (2018), reviewing recent arts-science engagements on climate change, conclude that these are moving beyond more conventional confines of awareness raising and entering new terrain of interdisciplinarity and knowledge co-creation. ...
... constitutes a carbon sink that captures carbon dioxide from the atmosphere and stores it in biomass through the process of photosynthesis (Zeng et al., 2013;Galafassi et al., 2018). ...
Thesis
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The response of woody vegetation dynamics to human and herbivory disturbances across land use categories (communal lands of Mutema-Musiakavanhu, buffer zone and Save Valley Conservancy (SVC)) were assessed in Save Valley, southeastern lowveld of Zimbabwe. Disturbance regimes, such as excessive herbivory and anthropogenic activities in the study area likely influence state-and-transition dynamics in woodland ecosystems. A stratified random design was used with the study strata divided based on three defined land use categories, where data was collected from November 2016 to December 2017. The study employed mixed methods approach including household questionnaire survey (n = 400), key informant interviews (n = 20) and focus group discussions (n = 80) to collect data on anthropogenic activities based on woodland resource utilization and the impact of human-wildlife conflicts. To measure woody vegetation attributes, herbivory and human disturbances, a total of 45 plots measuring 50 m x 20 m were assessed with 15 plots randomly placed in each of the three defined study strata. Specifically, changes occurring in land use and land cover were determined based on random land classification of LANDSAT images (1990 to 2015) and ancillary data. This study further used the Markov-cellular automata model to predict the land use and land cover changes across SVC for the period 2020 to 2040. Descriptive statistics and content analysis were used to analyze quantitative and qualitative data, respectively. In communal lands, a combination of agricultural land expansion, harvesting for firewood, timber and livestock grazing have modified the status of woody vegetation. The study recorded that woodlands contributed a range of 0.04% to 12.82% to the global annual income (GAI) of about US$1600 per household based on user rights discrimination around the woodland resources. However, the majority of farmers (86%, n = 258) had incurred annual economic loss of about US$800 per household due to human-wildlife conflicts as wild animals raid crops and prey on livestock. Furthermore, the study results recorded significant differences on the status of woody vegetation across the three defined land use categories. The human and herbivory disturbances decreased in intensity within the buffer zone with maximum species diversity of woody plants, thus confirming to the intermediate disturbance hypothesis. Model simulations predicted that by the 2040s, woodland and grassland cover in SVC will decrease by 46.73% and 10.54%, respectively, with at least over 6, 000% expansion of agricultural land use and bare land cover as compared to the 1990 land use and land cover categories. It was concluded that, human and herbivory induced disturbances were the main drivers of consistent woody vegetation dynamics across the study area. The study also revealed that both formal and informal institutions in the study area do not adequately implement policy pronouncements related to sustainable woodland management as they focus more on agricultural land use management and socio-economic use of woodland resources for human livelihood. It was recommendedthat Zimbabwe should consider aligning its woodland management policies and legislation with the Zimbabwe’s National Biodiversity Strategy and Action Plan (NBSAP, 2013-2020) so as to ensure national commitment with funding for government extension service delivery in the forestry sector, effectively utilize traditional leaders and best practices to protect the environment, wildlife and equitable use of woodland resources to benefit the present and future generations. The study further recommended the need to revisit the Zimbabwe land reform policy associated with agricultural resettlement and law enforcement agents to be effective in sustainable conservation of woodlands and protected wildlife areas in Zimbabwe.
... This type of article can present reflections about important aspects to consider in transdisciplinary research on human-nature rela- tions, such as reflexivity and reciprocity (Faria and Mollett 2016;Iniesta-Arandia et al. 2016;Jacobs et al. 2016), the role of different visual and artistic tools when conducting and communicating research (e.g. Heras et al. 2016; Rathwell and Armitage 2016; Galafassi et al. 2018), or considerations of ethical guidelines when conduct- ing fieldwork with indigenous people and local communities (e.g. International Society of Ethnobiology 2006). ...
Article
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This Editorial of the International Journal of Biodiversity Science, Ecosystem Services & Management (IJBESM) marks the end of this Journal’s publications under Rudolf de Groot. He has been instrumental in bringing the concept of ecosystem services to the fore, through seminal publications, books, lectures, through founding and chairing the Ecosystem Services Partnership (ESP); and finally, through ‘adding the ecosystem services to IJBESM’. After almost 8 years as Editor-in-Chief, he has decided to step down and hand over to a next generation. In the final part of this co-written Editorial, Rudolf de Groot will look back one last time at some highlights of the past years, partly together with his editorial team. The first part of this Editorial introduces the new co-Editors in Chief and how they envision the future of the Journal. Berta Martín-López (Leuphana University of Lüneburg, Germany) and Alexander van Oudenhoven (Leiden University, Netherlands) have gladly accepted to take over as co-Editors in Chief of IJBESM. They are interdisciplinary scientists at the forefront of research on social-ecological systems, ecosystem services, ecosystem management and sustainability transformation. Both are heavily involved in the Intergovernmental science-policy Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services (IPBES) and both have been actively involved with this Journal for several years. While acknowledging and building on the achievements of the last couple of years, they suggest a way forward for publishing research on human–nature relationships.
... In a recent study, Galafassi et al. (2018) concluded that popular culture and artparticularly narrative, visual, and performative art -is a powerful way of fostering a shared understanding of the challenges posed by climate change, as well as of promoting transformative climate action as a component of social learning. As artistic imaginaries make climate change culturally meaningful and enable emotional encounters, they allow people to connect with climate futures on a personal and affective level. ...
Research
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There are many ways in which climate futures can be envisioned, such as global and regional climate models, scenarios of future emission trajectories, or pathways and visions of societal transformation. All these anticipatory practices aim to make the climatic future knowable in the present. In so doing, they quite often envision a climatic future that is inherently violent: a future marked by disasters, wars, mass migration, turmoil, and terror. This working paper seeks to explain the popularity and tenacity of such violent imaginaries of (future) climate change in scientific research, popular culture, and political discourse. For this, it asks two interrelated questions: First, how do violent imaginaries of future climate change come about? Second, why and how do these imaginaries circulate and proliferate? To answer these questions, the paper provides a discussion of the concept of “violence” and elaborates how different forms of it are featured in imaginaries of future climate change. On this basis, the paper then traces three different modes of future-making that together produce and reproduce violent climate imaginaries: modeling the future, writing the future, and visualizing the future. Finally, the paper proposes and discusses several factors that could help explaining the circulation of violent climate imaginaries between the fields of science, fiction, and politics. These factors include the existence of an interdiscourse that bridges different specialized discourses, the broader political economy of imaginaries, interpersonal relations between actors in different fields, and the coproduction of dominant imaginaries with broader technological developments.
... Most art-science-based approaches are based on the fine arts and dance (Galafassi et al. 2018). Music may comprise an alternative way to represent the temporally dynamic structure of ecosystems and other complex systems, allowing for promising creative connections between music and sustainability problems (Angeler 2016a, Kagan andKirchberg 2016). ...
Article
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Art–science approaches are mounting to increase public literacy about sustainability challenges as planet Earth swiftly moves to an uncertain future. We use data sonification, an approach that allows converting scientific data into music, to document the large-scale transformation of the agricultural sector in central Spain during the 1970s. We converted 71-year time series of inundation area and rainfall data from the freshwater marsh Las Tablas de Daimiel into a soprano and bass voice, respectively. We composed “The Lament of Las Tablas de Daimiel,” which sings the biophysical disruption of the wetland due to the agricultural transformation. More generally, the song testifies to the demise of the natural aquatic environment due to unsustainable use of limited water resources in dryland countries and elsewhere. Making the mute voices of ecosystem heard may have potential to increase awareness about the unsustainable use of short water supplies and other social-ecological challenges. In the age of big data in science, data sonification may be a useful tool to represent and communicate such challenges.
... The humanities, arts and critical social sciences may support a robust response to questions over the continued presence of fossil fuel money in football in at least two ways. First, the arts have a vital role in drawing societal attention to the presence of financial arrangements that are not compatible with global climate obligations, and can provide a space where dialogues between different actors towards imagining transformative outcomes outside of the 'status quo' can happen (Galafassi et al., 2018). Second, areas of study such as applied philosophy and ethics can help to think through the breadth of ethical issues associated with fossil fuel financing in a robust way, and may be able to provide clubs, leagues and tournaments with guidance or principles on how to make ethically sound decisions on funding and sponsorship. ...
Preprint
Interest in how association football relates to climate change is growing rapidly. Clubs, players, football associations and fans themselves are increasingly calling for pro-active action to reduce football’s impact on the climate, and also to understand how climate change will impact upon football. However, issues such as maladaptation and carbon lock-in raised in recent IPCC reports remind us that there is a need to ensure well-intentioned actions are underpinned by the best available evidence. The purpose of this review is therefore to synthesise existing scholarly research at the interface of football and climate change, also drawing in analogous findings from other sports where relevant. The review identifies four main areas of research to date: the impact of football on the climate; the impacts of climate change on football; football as a driver for pro-climate actions; and the relationship between football and carbon-intensive industries. Four avenues for further research are proposed: assessing adaptation requirements for football across different geographical contexts; understanding what climate change means for local- or community-level football in addition to elite-level case studies; engaging social sciences and humanities in understanding how carbon-intensive industries relate to sense of place identity in football under a just transition, and developing principles for phasing-out financing from fossil fuels in football; and considering more fully and explicitly how climate change relates to women’s football.
... There are many examples of scenarios developed for and with local and regional decisionmakers, and other stakeholders, that are aligned with their interests and needs Oteros-Rozas et al. 2015). They often engage in creative exercises that can enable radical and inspiring visions of the future, as well as drawing on imaginative tools for articulating these stories, including art (Bendor et al. 2017;Galafassi et al. 2018), multimedia (Hajer and Pelzer 2018), science fiction prototyping ) and roleplaying games (Villamor and Van Noordwijk 2016). However, the scalability of these local insights into global context, and transferring them from one region to another, is challenging because they are not designed with such upscaling and transferability in mind. ...
Article
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Global Environmental Assessments (GEAs) are in a unique position to influence environmental decision-making in the context of sustainability challenges. To do this effectively, however, new methods are needed to respond to the needs of decision-makers for a more integrated, contextualized and goal-seeking evaluation of different policies, geared for action from global to local. While scenarios are an important tool for GEAs to link short-term decisions and medium and long-term consequences, these current information needs cannot be met only through deductive approaches focused on the global level. In this paper, we argue that a more diverse set of futures tools operating at multiple scales are needed to improve GEA scenario development and analysis to meet the information needs of policymakers and other stakeholders better. Based on the literature, we highlight four challenges that GEAs need to be able to address in order to contribute to global environmental decision-making about the future: 1. anticipate unpredictable future conditions; 2. be relevant at multiple scales, 3. include diverse actors, perspectives and contexts; and 4. leverage the imagination to inspire action. We present a toolbox of future-oriented approaches and methods that can be used to effectively address the four challenges currently faced by GEAs.
... Art can be a powerful tool in transformative futures processes (Galafassi et al. 2018, Pereira et al. 2018. In this study, we attempted to unite fiction, art, and climate action in a collaborative process that positions study participants as contributors to, not consumers of, art. ...
Article
Amid growing urgency behind the need to curb global greenhouse gas emissions, the COVID-19 pandemic has thrown the world into another crisis. Prominent conceptualizations of transformation suggest that crises like the pandemic may create windows of opportunity for transformative change, such as the scope and scale of systemic change required to address the climate crisis. Additionally, envisioning positive futures plays an important role in building shared commitment and inspiration for transformation, particularly if conducted in transformative spaces where actors with diverse framings and vulnerabilities can experiment with new practices and ideas. Emerging research demonstrates the potential for experimental futures methods to create such transformative spaces. In this study, we aimed to create a transformative space that builds inspiration and shared commitment for climate action while exploring the unique inflection point created by the COVID-19 pandemic. To do so, we constructed a highly creative participatory futuring process for participants involved in climate action in the Kitchener-Waterloo Region (Canada) to imagine desirable futures emerging from the crisis. Because we needed to move quickly and accommodate pandemic-related constraints to explore this unique moment in time, we also aimed to reflect on considerations for an agile futures practice in service of transformative change. Through a virtual workshop and surveys, participants envisioned future worlds in which local “seeds” of positive climate futures emerging during COVID-19 become mainstream. They also wrote science fiction stories of characters navigating those worlds. Observing artists depicted the futures through visual art. Reflections on our experience facilitating the process generated five considerations for a more agile futures practice in service of transformative change: adapt the ideal process to context-specific opportunities and constraints, align with strategic partners while ensuring everyone is in the room, underpin the process with values, treat everyone’s contributions as knowledge, and contextualize the role of inspiration as an outcome.
... Let alone in academic advancements of environmental knowledge, clearly sensitive to the complexity of socio-environmental systems. Contributors to this journal, for instance, tested and illustrated the use of drawing in groundwater research [3] and reviewed climate-related art projects [4], to promote transformations to sustainability. An analysis of scientific literature about environmentally-motivated art worldwide spelled out the nuanced connections between environmental activism, and gender and diversity [5]. ...
Article
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The far-reaching use of artworks (e.g. paintings, music, films) in environmental activism fosters cognitive processes and behavioural changes. At the margins of the environmental sustainability literature, the rising importance of environmental artivism is apparent with the surge of creativity after the conditions of isolation that started in 2020. There is an overall gap in literature on how different environmental claims and transformative initiatives are voiced and promoted through artistic media. This paper fills this gap by unfolding the foci, purposes and repertoire of artivists pursuing environmental sustainability. The synthesis of literature is conducted through lexicometry and illustrated with selected references. Artivism is a growing constituent of environmental activism, articulated around three major topics. The first one is the education of audiences through performative expressions of today’s global environmental crises, especially climate change. The second one involves ecocritical reflections of environmental controversies and conflicts towards creative emancipatory practices. The third one positions art practice as an avenue for environmental improvement across different sectors (e.g. water, mining, urban) with involvement of citizens, governments, and corporate actors. The paper informs readers about the state and prospects of environmental artivism for expressing, communicating, and engaging with transformative politics.
... Researchers claim the arts can advance sustainability science by embracing transdisciplinarity and expanding conventional epistemologies towards practical, embodied, and emotional domains (Pröpper 2017;Heinrichs & Kagan 2019;Scheffer et al. 2015). Artists have also increasingly drawn from sustainability science insights to develop novel artistic practices dealing with mounting social-ecological challenges (Gabrys and Yusoff 2012;Galafassi et al. 2018a). This mutual interest suggests a potential space for the development of hybrid practices (Benessia et al. 2012). ...
Article
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In recent years, a profusion of methods, practices, and experiences has emerged in the interface between arts and sustainability science. Drawing from two strong currents within sustainability science, namely, the emphasis on transdisciplinary approaches and the need to move towards societal transformations, such hybrid approaches seemingly contribute with unique methods to sustainability research. Despite repeated claims from sustainability scientists about art’s role in sustainability transformations, joint analyses with artists and practitioners are still rare. We conveyed a collaborative and exploratory workshop with scientists, artists, and practitioners from the fields of education, public engagement, and activism to identify the potentials for arts-based sustainability research. Participants were invited to facilitate and trial various artistic practices from disciplines of performative, literary, narrative, audio-visual and plastic arts. In this paper, we present five key areas identified in the workshop, where arts-based methods can significantly contribute to sustainability research: embracing more-than-cognitive aspects of knowledge, improving communication, grappling with power dynamics, shifting relationships to nature, and facilitating futures visioning. Workshop participants also identified challenges related to power dynamics, tensions across paradigms, and implementation conditions, providing insights into how to leverage arts’ potential to respond to global environmental challenges while boosting societal transformations. We then discuss research questions identified that address challenges and limitations for arts-based research in sustainability. Overall, these results suggest there are yet untapped resources and experiences within the field of arts-based sustainability science. (Audio-visual abstract available on S1)
... Referring to the power of visual media to influence people, Yuval Harari recently quipped 'a good science-fiction movie is worth far more than an article in Science or Nature' (2019, p. 249). Visual media can communicate messages quickly, and more vividly, than written information and have the power to engage our emotions in support of environmental action (Galafassi et al., 2018). ...
Article
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Empathy for nature is considered a prerequisite for sustainable interactions with the biosphere. Yet to date, empirical research on how to stimulate empathy remains scarce. Here, we investigate whether future scenarios can promote greater empathy for the oceans. Using a pre‐post empathy questionnaire, participants (N = 269) were presented with an optimistic or a pessimistic future scenario for the high seas in a virtual reality (VR) or written format. Results showed that post‐test empathy levels were significantly higher than pre‐test levels, indicating that future scenarios fostered ocean empathy. We also find that the pessimistic scenario resulted in greater empathy levels compared to the optimistic scenario. Finally, we found no significant difference between the VR and written conditions and found that empathy scores significantly decreased 3 months after the initial intervention. As one of the first studies to empirically demonstrate the influence of a purposeful intervention to build ocean empathy, this article makes critical contributions to advancing research on future scenarios and offers a novel approach for supporting ocean sustainability. A free Plain Language Summary can be found within the Supporting Information of this article. A free Plain Language Summary can be found within the Supporting Information of this article.
... Examples of enhanced public engagement through art and science collaborations have also been documented through science outreach programs (Drumm et al., 2015) and festivals (Beakerhead, 2017;Rosin et al., 2019). In addition, fields such as environmental science and ecology have seen an increase in support for arts-based initiatives to promote awareness and discussion around climate change and the environment (Galafassi et al., 2018;Stevens et al., 2019;Brault, 2020). ...
Article
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Science-art residencies can provide opportunities for insightful cross-disciplinary collaborations, science communication, and engagement with the general public. Currently, there are few formal ways for artists and scientists to collaborate in Canada, and even fewer publications on how these experiences can impact learning in informal settings. Art the Science (a Canadian non-profit organization facilitating cross-disciplinary relationships between artists and scientists) piloted a comprehensive multiphase science-art residency program. Phase 1 informed the artist’s work through a full-time experience in a scientific laboratory at an academic institution, Phase 2 showcased the artist’s final artwork, Between the Sand at an off-campus local community event, and Phase 3 published an interactive online version of the work for global exhibition. Residency evaluation in each phase was conducted through the use of qualitative and quantitative methods, including interviews, concept mapping, video diaries, and surveys. The artist, scientist and lab members gained new perspectives and inspiration about their respective fields. The artist was able to incorporate theories and processes from the research group into their artistic practice. On the other hand, the scientist saw renewed enthusiasm and curiosity within their research lab, and the lab members reported new ways of thinking about how to communicate their research. Both exhibitions proved to be engaging informal learning experiences for 66.2% of survey participants, and revealed several major learning themes. Despite promoting both events as artwork exhibitions, 79.2% of survey participants considered Between the Sand as both an artwork and a science communication product suggesting that science-based art may have the potential to communicate science, even when it is not presented as a science communication effort. Public responses revealed that public perception of funding is not skewed to either discipline and instead seems to call upon both science and arts grants to fund such interdisciplinary initiatives. Providing comprehensive artist residencies in science labs may have a valuable impact on everyone involved: the artist, the research group, and the public.
... It is the evidence on which nations are declaring climate emergencies and setting 'net zero' goals for 2050. While there is a much more modest social science and humanities literature (e.g. Brown et al., 2019;Galafassi et al., 2018) relating to this, integration of social science in general and the understanding of social drivers and their consequences is generally much less developed than biophysical research in global change research programmes (e.g. Mooney et al., 2013). ...
Article
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The ability to anticipate, plan for and adapt to the changes of the early Anthropocene is limited by human behaviour, political inertia, and short-termism. This ‘tragedy of the horizon’ is explored through three specific lenses on early Anthropocene futures. We begin with the dominant scientific evidence: mathematical and probabilistic modelling synthesised into increasingly rigorous and sophisticated scenarios for assessing policy options and broadening societal understanding. We then draw on the set of values, institutions, laws, and symbols through which people imagine their social whole in what Sheila Jasanoff describes as sociotechnical imaginaries. We also draw on institutional epistemologies as reflected in two global assessment initiatives: the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, which has been described as a ‘view from nowhere’, and the Intergovernmental Science-Policy Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services, a ‘view from everywhere’, though analysis has concluded that both organisations merely offer ‘views from somewhere’. We then present examples of other early Anthropocene imaginaries from writers, activists, and philosophers. The arc through these suggests both common themes and broad variation in underlying assumptions and world views. We argue that, especially in a post-truth world, a much richer form of (re)visioning the future is required in a project that must span far beyond the biophysical and include the full breadth of the social sciences and humanities. Without the inclusion of multiple underlying, competing, and creative long-term perspectives, society in general, and research in particular, may not adequately illuminate the complex possible future trajectories.
Article
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The rise and pervasiveness of post-truth and alternative facts posit fundamental questions for the current epistemic authority of scientific knowledge. In conjunction, complex and multi-scalar problems of the likes of climate change call for research that transcends traditional disciplinary silos, upon which much of that authority was built. As such, we call for a greater involvement of the humanities in environmental research and communication. We suggest that young researchers wishing to pursue academic careers (including ourselves) may be well equipped to reconfigure and reconcile science and the humanities within the context of their PhDs and beyond – taking a frontline position in the constant struggle to overcome longstanding antagonisms between the scholarship of fact-finding and that of meaning-making. We do so by exploring examples – within academia and beyond – where those collisions have been successful, including the works of a millennial scientist/artist and a dystopian video game.
Article
Temporal ecology is a growing research field aimed at understanding how temporal dynamics structure ecological systems in a changing environment. Ecosystems are exposed to accelerating environmental changes —mainly driven by climate change— that challenge their future survival. The main feature of this planetary process is that statistical properties such as mean, variance and autocorrelation are not constant over time. While this non-stationary climate change characteristic is well known, our premise is that far too much attention is given to ecosystems stationary responses, where annual cycles and seasonal changes of vegetation productivity are the main indicators for addressing environmental changes and planning rangeland management. Hence, shifts in other relevant intra-annual and inter-annual cycles are overlooked. We emphasize that a rigorous and systematic tool aimed at addressing these kinds of temporal changes in vegetation dynamics is lacking. We proposed an operative framework aimed at tackling the ability of rangelands to develop non-stationary responses in short periods, in the face of non-stationary changes in the dynamics of external factors driving its temporal functioning. In particular, we measured non-stationary dynamics of rangeland productivity by means of shifts in the hierarchy of frequency domain components over time of different rangelands’ photosynthetic activity from North-West Patagonia, Argentina, as measured by the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI). We emphasize the importance of a relevant temporal dimension of ecosystems with new insights into both the understanding of environmental changes impact on terrestrial ecosystems and the implementation of rangelands adaptive management.
Article
This article discusses the findings of an Arts and Humanities Research Council project researching how music festival communities in Scotland can address issues of environmental sustainability and climate change. It investigates how music festival communities are constructed with a focus on what role, if any, they might play in responding to the global challenge of environmental sustainability. Using music festivals in Scotland as a case study, we employed a variety of research methods to interrogate different constituents in music festival communities about their views and behaviours regarding climate change and environmental sustainability. These included festival audiences via onsite questionnaires; festival organisers and promoters via interviews and focus groups; and musicians via creative practice-led research. We conclude that rather than necessarily being a site for progressive or utopian socio-cultural experimentation (as they are occasionally portrayed in festival literature), music festival communities engage in complex and often contradictory behaviours when it comes to responding to – and making sense of – their own complicity in social challenges such as climate change.
Article
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Scenario development has been recognized as a potential method to explore future change and stimulate a reflective process that can contribute to more informed decision-making. The assessment process under IPBES (the Intergovernmental Science-Policy Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services) has how-ever shown that the current predominantly biophysical and economic models and scenario processes for exploring the future of biodiversity, ecosystem services and their contributions to human wellbeing are insufficient to capture the complexity and context-specific nature of the problems facing these sectors. Several important challenges have been identified that require a more in-depth analysis of where more imaginative scenario efforts can be undertaken to address this gap. In this paper, we identify six key characteristics necessary for scenario processes: adaptability across diverse contexts, inclusion of diverse knowledge and value systems, legitimate stakeholder engagement that foregrounds the role of power and politics, an ability to grapple with uncertainty, individual and collective thinking mechanisms and relevance to policy making. We compared four cases of imaginative, arts-based scenario processes that each offer aspects of meeting these criteria. These approaches emphasise the importance of engaging the imagination of those involved in a process and harnessing it as a tool for identifying and conceptual-ising more transformative future trajectories. Drawing on the existing literature, we argue that there is value in fostering more inclusive and creative participatory processes that acknowledge the importance of understanding multiple value systems and relationships in order to reimagine a more inclusive and just future. Based on this, we reflect on future research to understand the transformative role that imagination can play in altering and enhancing knowledge-making for global assessments, including IPBES. We conclude that creative scenario co-development processes that promote imagination and create an opening for more empathetic responses should be considered as complementary tools within the suite of methodologies used for future IPBES scenario development.
Article
Environmental governance must engage with and intervene within complex and frequently contradictory imaginative structures and relations. Navigating the tensions and opportunities within collective and individual imaginations requires attention to how different governance techniques and strategies integrate, draw on, and target ways of seeing, valuing, and making sense of the world. This article outlines a theory of imaginative governance and distinguishes between two broad forms imaginative governance can take—one in which imagination is a tool of governance and another in which imagination is an object of governance. This approach to conceptualizing imaginative governance is applied to efforts to address urban environmental issues. The article concludes by highlighting ways in which human geography can contribute to better understanding how, why, and through what means imaginative governance unfolds, as well as exploring possibilities for more just and transformative governance approaches. Key Words: environmental governance, imagination, transformation, urban governance.
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The contamination of life with plastic pollution and humanity’s lethargic response to the problem is an unfolding terror: a story of Gothic horror unfolding in contemporary times. The power of Mary Shelley’s Gothic novel Frankenstein looms over the current terror of plastic pollution to encourage changes to the materials we create, use and discard. In Frankenstein, a monster was spawned in a process that desecrates the act of creating new life. Similarly, in my work of art Microplastics Found in Human Embryo, the depiction of an embryo is desecrated by plastic contamination. Frankenstein was unable to control his monster, and, denied empathy and love, the monster killed Frankenstein’s loved ones and haunted its creator’s soul. As microplastics are largely unseen, and increasing exponentially, they are becoming a modern monster. Microplastics can cross the placenta and the blood brain barrier, endangering the life and health of our children, potentially robbing us of progeny, and the future of humankind. Over the past two hundred years, Frankenstein has functioned as a shadowy mnemonic tale, haunting scientists and technologists by reminding them to consider the impacts of their creations. Shelley’s message, if applied to the current dangers of the “Age of Plastic”, might help us to clean up plastic pollution and embrace sustainable materials. In this spirit, Microplastics Found in Human Embryo reveals a monstrous idea, which aims to help awaken us from complacency and convince humanity to form a relationship which sustains all forms of life on Earth.Keywords: Plastic, Pollution, Environment, Art, Frankenstein, Horror, Monster, Gothic
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Figueira and Fullman reflect on the need to rethink cultural relations and exchange in consideration of engaging meaningfully in creating solutions for Earth’s current ecological crisis within the interdisciplinary context of the Critical Zone. From this perspective, they examine relevant theory and practical aspects of international relations, arts and cultural management, and cultural policy to explore the possibilities and limitations of each of these areas of study in addressing sustainability during the Anthropocene era. Cultural relations and exchange are advocated for as critical contributions towards adapting to climate change alongside the under-utilised potential of the arts and humanities. Cultural engagement within higher education, through arts and cultural management programmes, is then positioned as a significant leverage point intervention to change systems in order to achieve a sustainable cosmopolitan and inclusive human society.
Technical Report
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The report brings together perspectives from natural and social science, humanities, and the arts to understand and evaluate how modern landscapes can absorb the impact of potential zero-carbon policies. It advocates for a holistic approach identifying a number of gaps in current landscape decision-making approaches and recommends a) adopting transdisciplinary and cross-sectoral approaches considering, alongside scientific, aesthetic, ethical and social factors; b) promoting robust (learning from the past) ecosystem management practices that enhance biodiversity and build the resilience of ecosystems, and finally c) increasing local and devolved decision-making capabilities harnessing creativity and prioritising inclusion and social justice.
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Artists and arts research can offer new perspectives and contribute to transformative ways of exploring, challenging and understanding existing meanings and values, as well as creating new ones through the co-production of new knowledge and experiences. The report endorses existing practices and triggers new thinking in doing research related to landscapes and environments by revealing the ways in which artists can operate as researchers, either independently or as part of multi-, inter-, and trans-disciplinary teams. It also addresses issues of the relationships between artist and non-artist researchers and offers positive suggestions about what arts research can bring to research and decisions about landscapes and environmental management.
Thesis
Water scarcity has become one of the world's most pressing issues, one that particularly affects arid regions, where there is little or no precipitation and groundwater is not available or is polluted. My practice-based research investigates an alternative means of collecting water from fog arising from imaginative solutions brought forward by art and science collaboration. The collaboration challenged the standard method of collecting water from fog with grid mesh nets and proposed an alternative method of harvesting fog water with a net of parallel vertical fibres. This new idea came from an image of a forest of fibres that launched technical research on a new substrate (a net of parallel fibre), controlled production of artificial fog on a large scale and the proposition of novel aerodynamic structural forms.My art-based research expanded on the scientific question of efficiency through the production of multi-sensory installations that aim at bringing forward a more acute awareness of the intricate co-existence we share and must sustain with water, not as a passive object of investigation, but rather a participant in meaning co-creation. In adopting posthumanist and new materialist philosophical stances of agential realism, my art has concentrated on the creation of a platform of encounter and exchange, inviting the public to enact what feminist theorist Karen Barad calls an “ethical response-ability” (the ability to respond to a call for participation, i.e., ethical behaviour) by engaging with artworks’ space of materiality, physicality and meaning. This interactive, ethically responsive approach has been extended to the writing process through the use of different forms of narration (possibly atypical for a thesis), to invite readers to become participants in meaning co-creation.The art and science collaboration described in the current thesis has successfully demonstrated the power of imagination and participation that created new relationships and novel solutions. However, to deal with complex problems such as water scarcity, we need to extend the invitation to participate beyond artists, scientists, and viewer/participants to include the communities for which the research is intended, thereby expanding the circle of inclusion and closing the gap between what we know, what we sense and feel, and what we do.
Article
Purpose The purpose of this paper is to increase understandings of the complexity of stakeholder relationships and their impact on environmental practices in music festivals in Western Canada, but also to highlight how managers can leverage their festival platform for stakeholders to create new partnerships that foster and support primary values around sustainability. Design/methodology/approach We use a community-based participatory framework to guide this study, and qualitative research methods in the form of in-depth interviews and surveys at three separate music festivals within the interior of British Columbia, Canada. Findings The majority of patrons are aware of the environmental impacts of music festivals and are more likely to attend a festival with effective practices. By making environmental sustainability a core value of the festival and communicating environmental objectives with both stakeholders and patrons, managers can begin to alleviate the operational barriers to environmentalism. Originality/value One of the primary contributions of this study is that it provides management with deeper understandings of a wide range of barriers to effective environmental practices in Western Canada. We consult directly with both festival management and attendees about environmental practices. This paper presents a fuller perspective of how to move beyond simple measures and craft a more sophisticated and flexible environmental strategy that reduces risk, anticipates obstacles and greatly improves the odds of successful implementation.
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Non-technical summary Modern society without plastics is difficult to imagine. Yet the global plastic system is linked to a multitude of problems of a scope that is hard to grasp and address. In short, we are facing a plastic crisis. This article explores the role of art in stimulating critical reflection about plastics and analyses how it contributes to making the plastic crisis increasingly visible. Plastic-related artworks mostly focus on ocean pollution and do not pay due attention to other aspects of the plastic crisis. At the same time, they creatively communicate clear and emotionally charged messages. Art has the potential to play an important role in coming to grips with the plastic crisis if it succeeds in adopting a broader understanding of the problem.
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There is a growing literature challenging assumptions about what 'data' on disaster risks and climate change can be and arguing for the need to account for experiences and knowledge from across deeper history. In this paper, we argue that small island states and sub-national jurisdictions can especially benefit from a broader understanding of what data can be and we illustrate how historical narrative and descriptive data from archives can act as a valuable source of knowledge on disasters and climate, both past, and present. Yet, in order to use (and not misuse) these archival sources, we must first appreciate how islands and their histories have previously been engaged with, and how certain narratives about small islands may have shaped how historical data is engaged with (or not). We critically analyse current approaches when engaging with island histories, with particular consideration of the legacy of colonisation and imperialism, and how this is manifested in historical data and methods. Finally, we explore how island histories can educate and inform, locally and globally, realising connections between communities across time and space. We conclude that narrative and descriptive archival historical data is an invaluable source for understanding island vulnerability and resilience. Without such data, our understanding, and our efforts to address contemporary challenges, are likely to be flawed. However, we caution against elevating any one type of data or disciplinary lens. By combining such data with multiple types of data, both literate and non-literate, we can reach a deeper historical and long-term understanding of disaster risks and climate change in small island states and sub-national island jurisdictions.
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The 17 sustainable development goals and their 169 targets comprise a comprehensive list of prerequisites for human and planetary well-being, but they also implicitly invoke many of the very trade-offs, synergies, and parallelisms that drive global crises. Decision-makers are familiar with these internal conflicts, and there is no shortage of frameworks, blueprints, and roadmaps to accelerate sustainability. However, thus far, inevitable trade-offs among competing priorities for sustainability are not catalyzing the types of transformations called for, indeed, demanded, by the SDGs. Habitual technocratic approaches, which the SDG lend themselves to, will report on indicators and targets, but will not adequately represent the ambitions of the goals themselves. Addressing these habitual tendencies, this paper therefore considers the inner dimensions of transformation, including emotions and meaning-making. Music offers a rich source of metaphor to reimagine interconnections and communicates affectively the feelings and embodied dimensions of intellectual thought and creativity. We draw on Western musical composition and history to offer insights on an intellectual path-dependency leading up to the current disembodied indicator-based management and regulation of global environmental and societal crises, and on potential alternatives. As metaphors, we consider what the SDGs might ‘sound like’ as either 12-tone, contrapuntal, or improvisational expression. We suggest that for the SDGs to release their transformative potential, ‘sustainability improvisers’ with a handle on both the ‘what’ and the ‘how’ of transformation are needed: harnessed with deep understanding of SDG indicators and targets, but with an ability to listen deeply and invite others to co-create transformative pathways.
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This paper argues for an integrative approach to sustainability transformations, one that reconnects body and mind, that fuses art and science and that integrates diverse forms of knowledge in an open, collaborative and creative way. It responds to scholarship emphasizing the importance of connecting disparate ways of knowing, including scientific, artistic, embodied and local knowledges to better understand environmental change and to foster community resilience and engagement. This paper draws on the experience of an arts-based project in Lisbon, Portugal, and explores embodied and performative practices and their potential for climate change transformations. It puts forward and enlivens an example, where such forms of engaging communities can provide new insight into how equitable, just and sustainable transformations can come about. The process involved a series of interactive workshops with diverse arts-based methods and embodied practices to create performative material. From this process, a space emerged for the creation of meaning about climate change. Three key elements stood out in this process as being potentially important for the emergence of meaning-making and for understanding the impact of the project: the use of metaphors, embedding the project locally, and the use of creative, embodied practices. This furthers research, suggesting that the arts can play a critical role in engaging people with new perspectives on climate change and sustainability issues by offering opportunities for critical reflection and providing spaces for creative imagination and experimentation. Such processes may be important for contributing to the changes needed to realize transformations to sustainability.
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A neoliberal capitalist discourse dominates global affairs, with devastating effects for ecological integrity and social justice. Diverse alternative discourses challenge its dominance. This paper reviews alternative discourses to surface discursive common ground and conflicts, arguing that this is an important step towards the formation of discourse coalitions that could rival the political power of neoliberal capitalism. There is common ground in how alternative discourses see the world (systems and networks), their normative relationship with nature (sustainable, regenerative or planetcentric) and with each other (cooperative and entangled), their goals (wellbeing, justice and plurality) and some of the strategies for transformation (participatory governance, a new economic system, prioritizing different human values and participatory knowledge practices). There are also important conflicts that could offer productive sites for agonistic dialogue between plural discourses. These common and conflicting memes may be seeds of the discursive transformation that is essential to support flourishing, sustainable futures.
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Against an increasingly compartmentalized educational landscape, we have heard urgent calls for new modes of teaching and learning. In this light, educators from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds turned to transdisciplinarity and the arts for a possible response. The educational initiatives being developed and the related literature are situated across a wide range of themes, disciplines, and methodologies. The fragmented nature of the academic discussion inhibits our capacity to think through the implications of mobilizing the concept of transdisciplinarity within the arts and education. This study addresses the lack of an overview by conducting a systematic review of the literature characterized by a triangular interest in higher education, transdisciplinarity, and the arts. The documents under review amount to 458 unique scientific papers. In our results, we present a metaphorical scale – moving from buzzwords to a theoretically delineated usage – to make sense of the use and conceptualization of transdisciplinarity and we introduce three main ways how the arts are part of transdisciplinary educational compositions. In bringing together literature on education, the arts, and transdisciplinarity, we shed light on relevant similarities between thinking and doing that too often operates in isolation. As such, we aim to facilitate opportunities for mutual learning and present an improved vantage point from which to consider how decisions regarding particular conceptualizations and positionalities feed into our artistic and educational practices.
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Global South communities are increasingly exposed and vulnerable to natural hazards such as floods and droughts. Preparing for future hazards requires developing an idea of an uncertain future, thinking out of the box for possible solutions, enhancing communication between diverse groups, and instigating organisational and behavioural change. In this study, we explore whether art and creativity could support this process by presenting the results of a literature-mapping exercise and a case study. Our search for journal articles, focusing on Global South communities and topics like environmental issues, hazards, and health, yielded 267 papers published between 2000 and 2018. These used a diversity of art forms, including photography and other forms of visual art, music and song, and drama and storytelling. We found that papers on the topic of climate change generally had lower co-creation (62 % medium to high) than those on health (90 % medium to high). A subset of seven papers focusing on drought and flooding fell into the following two categories: those aiming to raise the general public's awareness of these hazards and those aiming to instigate adaptation action by the participants. In our case study, we explored the middle ground between these categories. In a pilot project in South Africa, we designed storytelling workshops in which community members explored scientific data on future droughts, exchanged ideas between groups, and developed narratives about the impacts of and preparedness for future drought. These narratives were filmed and edited and shared both with the community and with governance actors. We found that this approach allowed participants to imagine future droughts, opened up conversations about potential adaptation measures, encouraged intergenerational exchange, and increased awareness of local issues for policy makers. Both in the wider literature and in our case study, the long-term effects of creative interventions are rarely evaluated. Feedback from participants, however, indicates a number of short-term benefits, which shows the potential of combining creative practice approaches and more conventional approaches into a more holistic preparation for future natural hazards.
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The Paris Agreement has opened debate on whether limiting warming to 1.5 °C is compatible with current emission pledges and warming of about 0.9 °C from the mid-nineteenth century to the present decade. We show that limiting cumulative post-2015 CO2 emissions to about 200 GtC would limit post-2015 warming to less than 0.6 °C in 66% of Earth system model members of the CMIP5 ensemble with no mitigation of other climate drivers, increasing to 240 GtC with ambitious non-CO2 mitigation. We combine a simple climate–carbon-cycle model with estimated ranges for key climate system properties from the IPCC Fifth Assessment Report. Assuming emissions peak and decline to below current levels by 2030, and continue thereafter on a much steeper decline, which would be historically unprecedented but consistent with a standard ambitious mitigation scenario (RCP2.6), results in a likely range of peak warming of 1.2–2.0 °C above the mid-nineteenth century. If CO2 emissions are continuously adjusted over time to limit 2100 warming to 1.5 °C, with ambitious non-CO2 mitigation, net future cumulative CO2 emissions are unlikely to prove less than 250 GtC and unlikely greater than 540 GtC. Hence, limiting warming to 1.5 °C is not yet a geophysical impossibility, but is likely to require delivery on strengthened pledges for 2030 followed by challengingly deep and rapid mitigation. Strengthening near-term emissions reductions would hedge against a high climate response or subsequent reduction rates proving economically, technically or politically unfeasible.
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Sustainability science focuses on generating and applying knowledge to environmentally sound human development around the world. It requires working toward greater integration of different types of knowledge, ways of knowing, and between academy and society. We contribute to the development of approaches for learning from indigenous knowledge, through enhanced understanding of the system of values, meanings, and relationships afforded by indigenous arts. We focus on a long-term, participatory action research project developed for the revitalization of weaving knowledge among three Kawaiwete (also known as Kaiabi) indigenous groups in the Amazon. The problem was originally defined by indigenous communities, concerned with the erosion of weaving knowledge of basketry and textiles among men and women. Methods for coproduction of knowledge included dialogical methods and tools, indigenous-led strategies, and quantitative and qualitative approaches across biophysical and social sciences. Longitudinal and cross-sectional studies considered multiple dimensions, scales, and networks of knowledge creation, distribution, and transmission. Innovation and articulation with western systems, along with shamanism, gender, and leadership, were key factors enhancing artistic knowledge resilience. We reflect on lessons learned and implications of this initiative for broadening the understanding of art and science intersections toward a sustainable future.
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We report on preliminary results from a public engagement project based on a procedural approach to sustainability. The project centered on an interactive art installation that comprised a live actor, an immersive soundscape featuring a handful of different characters, an interactive touch-table, and four interactive rooms within which participants wandered, partially guided by a narrative through-line, yet at the same time left to make sense of any larger meanings on their own. The installation was designed to experiment with two propositions: (1) that there is value in public engagement with sustainability based on the exploration and articulation of deeply held beliefs about the world—the worldviews, values, and presuppositions that mediate perception and action; (2) that there is value in replacing the infocentric tendency of most public engagement on sustainability with an approach premised in aesthetics and experiential resonance. Following the installation’s two-week pilot run, our preliminary results indicated that the majority of participants found the experience both resonant and thought provoking, and were mostly willing to critically engage with their pre-existing notions of sustainability.
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We discuss the use of participatory drama and transformative theatre to understand the sources of risk and resilience with coastal communities. We analyze and describe two performances developed as part of a project exploring people’s resilience to extreme weather events and to coastal dynamics in the face of climate change. We examine the process of devising the performance, which used various elicitation techniques to examine what matters to people in times of change and how people are able to respond to changes now and in the future. We discuss how creative practices such as participatory drama may contribute to the understanding of resilience, challenge assumptions, and bring new perspectives. Finally, we discuss how participatory drama informs action- and solutions-oriented work around resilience, poverty, and change.
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In the last 5years, climate change has emerged as a dominant theme in literature and, correspondingly, in literary studies. Its popularity in fiction has given rise to the term cli-fi, or climate change fiction, and speculation that this constitutes a distinctive literary genre. In theater, the appearance of several big-name productions from 2009 to 2011 has inspired an increase in climate change plays. There has been a growing trend, too, of climate change poetry, thanks to the rise of ecopoetry (poetry that exhibits ecological awareness and engages with the world's current state of environmental degradation) and the launch of some key climate change poetry initiatives in the media. This prevalence of climate change literature has brought about a greater engagement with climate change in literary studies, notably the environmentally oriented branch of literary studies called ecocriticism. The increasing number of ecocritical analyses of climate change literature, particularly novels, is helping to shape a canon of climate change fiction. In a separate development, there has been greater interest in the phenomenon of climate change in literary or critical theory (the branch of literary studies concerned with literary concepts and philosophies rather than with literary texts). This development-centered on the study of climate change as a philosophical or existentialist problem-is sometimes termed climate change criticism or critical climate change.
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A frequent suggestion to increase individuals' willingness to take action on climate change and to support relevant policies is to highlight its proximal consequences, that is, those that are close in space and time. But previous studies that have tested this proximizing approach have not revealed the expected positive effects on individual action and support for addressing climate change. We present three lines of psychological reasoning that provide compelling arguments as to why highlighting proximal impacts of climate change might not be as effective a way to increase individual mitigation and adaptation efforts as is often assumed. Our contextualization of the proximizing approach within established psychological research suggests that, depending on the particular theoretical perspective one takes on this issue, and on specific individual characteristics suggested by these perspectives, proximizing can bring about the intended positive effects, can have no (visible) effect or can even backfire. Thus, the effects of proximizing are much more complex than is commonly assumed. Revealing this complexity contributes to a refined theoretical understanding of the role that psychological distance plays in the context of climate change and opens up further avenues for future research and for interventions.
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The volume is the report of the American Sociological Association's Task Force on Sociology and Global Climate Change, and the 13 chapters provide syntheses of sociological (and related) research on key aspects of climate change.
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Taking a wider view, departing from the specific case of the Hamburg exchange between artists and climate scientists, this comment envisages some radical potential for the collaboration of artists and climate scientists: moving beyond the traditional boundaries of social systems, artistic research and climate science may engage in a shared transdisciplinary learning process. They may communicate with the rest of society by engaging with others to develop 'spaces of possibilities', thus nurturing the creative resilience of communities.
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Calls for more broad-based, integrated, useful knowledge now abound in the world of global environmental change science. They evidence many scientists' desire to help humanity confront the momentous biophysical implications of its own actions. But they also reveal a limited conception of social science and virtually ignore the humanities. They thereby endorse a stunted conception of 'human dimensions' at a time when the challenges posed by global environmental change are increasing in magnitude, scale and scope. Here, we make the case for a richer conception predicated on broader intellectual engagement and identify some preconditions for its practical fulfilment. Interdisciplinary dialogue, we suggest, should engender plural representations of Earth's present and future that are reflective of divergent human values and aspirations. In turn, this might insure publics and decision-makers against overly narrow conceptions of what is possible and desirable as they consider the profound questions raised by global environmental change.
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Scholars and policy makers are becoming increasingly interested in the processes that lead to transformations toward sustainability. We explored how resilience thinking, and a stronger focus on social-ecological systems, can contribute to existing studies of sustainability transformations. First, we responded to two major points of critique: the claim that resilience theory is not useful for addressing sustainability transformations, and that the role of "power" in transformation processes has been underplayed by resilience scholars. Second, we highlighted promising work that combines insights from different theoretical strands, a strategy that strengthens our understanding of sustainability transformations. We elaborated three research areas on which such combined perspectives could focus: innovation and social-ecological-technological systems interactions, patterns of transformation, and agency and transformation.
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Transformation as an adaptive response to climate change opens a range of novel policy options. Used to describe responses that produce non-linear changes in systems or their host social and ecological environments, transformation also raises distinct ethical and procedural questions for decision-makers. Expanding adaptation to include transformation foregrounds questions of power and preference that have so far been underdeveloped in adaptation theory and practice. We build on David Harvey’s notion of activity space to derive a framework and research agenda for climate change adaptation seen as a political decision-point and as an opportunity for transformation, incremental adjustment or resistance to change in development pathway. Decision-making is unpacked through the notion of the activity space into seven coevolving sites: the individual, technology, livelihoods, discourse, behaviour, the environment and institutions. The framework is tested against practitioner priorities to define an agenda that can make coherent advances in research and practice on climate change adaptation.
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Although storytelling often has negative connotations within science, narrative formats of communication should not be disregarded when communicating science to nonexpert audiences. Narratives offer increased comprehension, interest, and engagement. Nonexperts get most of their science information from mass media content, which is itself already biased toward narrative formats. Narratives are also intrinsically persuasive, which offers science communicators tactics for persuading otherwise resistant audiences, although such use also raises ethical considerations. Future intersections of narrative research with ongoing discussions in science communication are introduced.
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The rapid acceleration and intensity of global environmental change places great demands on humanity for developing innovative views and processes for the integration of knowledge in ways that are conducive to sustainability learning. In this paper, we argue that in order to develop robust sustainability learning feedbacks between knowledge and action we need the coupling of Human Information and Knowledge Systems (HIKS) with social–ecological systems (SES) dynamics. In particular, a substantial change in core worldviews and understandings about the nature of HIKS and how they relate to SES is required. Changing such epistemological and ontological assumptions of the quality of robust social–ecological knowledge is a first step for the emergence of transformative pathways towards sustainability in research, education, and policy. To enhance our understanding of such complexity, we describe two general ideal-type worldviews of HIKS and their relationships with SES in Western culture. One worldview understands information and knowledge systems as evolving in a closed, ahistorical, social-ecologically disembodied linear space, in ways which can be reduced to a single form of representation. The other worldview understands information and knowledge systems as operating in an open space composed of multiple and diverse patterns of hybrid social–ecological practices and configurations, inevitably embedded in specific times, spaces and contextual conditions. We argue that the open, but socio-ecologically embodied worldview is better suited to support sustainability learning and transformation.
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An introduction needs to be made between the rich cultural knowledge of social studies and the natural sciences.
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Fear-inducing representations of climate change are widely employed in the public domain. However, there is a lack of clarity in the literature about the impacts that fearful messages in climate change communications have on people's senses of engagement with the issue and associated implications for public engagement strategies. Some literature suggests that using fearful representations of climate change may be counterproductive. The authors explore this assertion in the context of two empirical studies that investigated the role of visual, and iconic, representations of climate change for public engagement respectively. Results demonstrate that although such representations have much potential for attracting people's attention to climate change, fear is generally an ineffective tool for motivating genuine personal engagement. Nonthreatening imagery and icons that link to individuals' everyday emotions and concerns in the context of this macro-environmental issue tend to be the most engaging. Recommendations for constructively engaging individuals with climate change are given.
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Over the last quarter-century, an increasing number of artists have been variously engaging the public in artworks addressing the anthropogenic phenomenon known as climate change. Focusing specifically on works developed in the fields of visual arts, performance and new media, and on a body of theory attempting to distinguish between terms such as nature, landscape, weather, climate and environment, this article aims to offer an exploration of how these works, by adopting, often concurrently, three strategies—representation, performance and mitigation—affect our understanding of our changing relationship to nature and climate.
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Within climate change debates, writers and scholars have called for expanded methods for producing science, for proposing strategies for mitigation and adaptation, and for engaging with publics. Arts–sciences discourses are one area in which increasing numbers of practitioners and researchers are exploring ways in which interdisciplinarity may provide a space for reconsidering the role of cultural and creative responses to environmental change. Yet what new perspectives does the arts–science intersection offer for rethinking climate change? Which historic conjunctions of arts–sciences are most useful to consider in relation to present-day practices, or in what ways do these previous alignments significantly shift in response to climate change? The uncertainty, contingency, and experimentation necessarily characteristic of climate change may generate emergent forms of practice that require new approaches—not just to arts and sciences, but also at the new thresholds, or ‘meetings and mutations’ that these practices cross. Thresholds—narrated here through the figure of ‘zero degrees’—offer a way to bring together sites of encounter, transformations, uncertainties, future scenarios, material conditions and political practices in relation to climate change. Such shifting thresholds and relations lead not to fundamental re-definitions or demarcations of arts and sciences, arguably, but rather to shared encounters with politics. Drawing on philosophies of aesthetics and sciences elaborated by Jacques Rancière and Isabelle Stengers, we point to the ways in which political possibility is entangled with aesthetic-material conditions and practices, and how recognition of these interrelations might enable ‘collective experimentation’ within both creative practices and climate sciences.
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Climate change is not ‘a problem’ waiting for ‘a solution’. It is an environmental, cultural and political phenomenon which is re-shaping the way we think about ourselves, our societies and humanity’s place on Earth. Drawing upon twenty-five years of professional work as an international climate change scientist and public commentator, Mike Hulme provides a unique insider’s account of the emergence of this phenomenon and the diverse ways in which it is understood. He uses different standpoints from science, economics, faith, psychology, communication, sociology, politics and development to explain why we disagree about climate change. In this way he shows that climate change, far from being simply an ‘issue’ or a ‘threat’, can act as a catalyst to revise our perception of our place in the world. Why We Disagree About Climate Change is an important contribution to the ongoing debate over climate change and its likely impact on our lives.
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A high and sustainable quality of life is a central goal for humanity. Our current socio-ecological regime and its set of interconnected worldviews, institutions, and technologies all support the goal of unlimited growth of material production and consumption as a proxy for quality of life. However, abundant evidence shows that, beyond a certain threshold, further material growth no longer significantly contributes to improvement in quality of life. Not only does further material growth not meet humanity's central goal, there is mounting evidence that it creates significant roadblocks to sustainability through increasing resource constraints (i.e., peak oil, water limitations) and sink constraints (i.e., climate disruption). Overcoming these roadblocks and creating a sustainable and desirable future will require an integrated, systems level redesign of our socio-ecological regime focused explicitly and directly on the goal of sustainable quality of life rather than the proxy of unlimited material growth. This transition, like all cultural transitions, will occur through an evolutionary process, but one that we, to a certain extent, can control and direct. We suggest an integrated set of worldviews, institutions, and technologies to stimulate and seed this evolutionary redesign of the current socio-ecological regime to achieve global sustainability.
Book
An intellectual history of contrasting ideas around the power of the arts to bring about personal and societal change - for better and worse. A fascinating account of the value and functions of the arts in society, in both the private sphere of individual emotions and self-development and public sphere of politics and social distinction. © Eleonora Belfiore and Oliver Bennett 2008. All rights reserved.
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Although the Paris Agreement's goals (1) are aligned with science (2) and can, in principle, be technically and economically achieved (3), alarming inconsistencies remain between science-based targets and national commitments. Despite progress during the 2016 Marrakech climate negotiations, long-term goals can be trumped by political short-termism. Following the Agreement, which became international law earlier than expected, several countries published mid-century decarbonization strategies, with more due soon. Model-based decarbonization assessments (4) and scenarios often struggle to capture transformative change and the dynamics associated with it: disruption, innovation, and nonlinear change in human behavior. For example, in just 2 years, China's coal use swung from 3.7% growth in 2013 to a decline of 3.7% in 2015 (5). To harness these dynamics and to calibrate for short-term realpolitik, we propose framing the decarbonization challenge in terms of a global decadal roadmap based on a simple heuristic—a “carbon law”—of halving gross anthropogenic carbon-dioxide (CO2) emissions every decade. Complemented by immediately instigated, scalable carbon removal and efforts to ramp down land-use CO2 emissions, this can lead to net-zero emissions around mid-century, a path necessary to limit warming to well below 2°C.
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Recent GHG emissions trends are in stark contrast with the Paris Agreement’s target to hold the increase in average global warming to “well below 2 °C and pursue efforts to stay below 1,5 °C” by the end of the century compared with preindustrial times. This disconnect has further unveiled the limitations of current knowledge production and communication processes in Southern European countries, where fast institutional changes are needed to address the potential impacts as well as the opportunities for transformation derived from High-End Climate Change (HECC). The prevailing knowledge deficit-model – aimed at producing ‘more knowledge’ about climate impacts, vulnerabilities and long-term scenarios to decision makers – has long proven inadequate in tackling the many complexities of the present socio-climate quandary. The growing emphasis on assessing and implementing concrete solutions, demand new and more complex forms of agent interactions in the production, framing, communication and use of climate knowledge; and in particular, explicit procedures able to tackle difficult normative questions regarding assessment of solutions and the allocation of individual and collective responsibilities. To explore these challenges, we analyse the views of 30 Spanish knowledge contributors and users of the latest UN IPCC AR5 report and share the insights gained from the implementation of a participatory Integrated Assessment procedure aimed at developing innovative solutions to high-end climate scenarios in Iberia. Our analysis supports the view of the need to institutionalise transformation, and in particular underlines the potential role that transformative climate boundary organisations could play to address such difficult ethical choices in different contexts of action.
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In December 2015, member states of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) adopted the Paris Agreement, which aims to hold the increase in the global average temperature to below 2°C and to pursue efforts to limit the temperature increase to 1.5°C. The Paris Agreement requires that anthropogenic greenhouse gas emission sources and sinks are balanced by the second half of this century. Because some nonzero sources are unavoidable, this leads to the abstract concept of “negative emissions,” the removal of carbon dioxide (CO2) from the atmosphere through technical means. The Integrated Assessment Models (IAMs) informing policy-makers assume the large-scale use of negative-emission technologies. If we rely on these and they are not deployed or are unsuccessful at removing CO2 from the atmosphere at the levels assumed, society will be locked into a high-temperature pathway.
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The arts are becoming a favored medium for conveying science to the public. Tracking trending approaches, such as community-engaged learning, alongside challenges and goals can help establish metrics to achieve more impactful outcomes, and to determine the effectiveness of arts-based science communication for raising awareness or shaping public policy.
Article
Climate change is recognized as an urgent societal problem with widespread implications for both natural and human systems, and transforming society at the rate and scale that is mandated by the 2015 Paris Agreement remains a major challenge. Do we need to be open to new paradigms for social change? In this opinion piece, I draw attention to the emerging field of quantum social theory and consider its implications for climate change responses. Quantum social theory considers how concepts, methods and understandings from quantum physics relate to societal issues, and it provides a physically based, holistic perspective on conscious and intentional transformations to sustainability. It is distinct from other social theories in that it raises deep metaphysical and ontological questions about what is really real. I explore the methodological, metaphorical and meaningful significance of quantum social theory for understandings of social change. Quantum concepts such as entanglement, complementarity, uncertainty, and superposition provide a strong basis for recognizing and promoting people as the solution to climate change. WIREs Clim Change 2016, 7:618–626. doi: 10.1002/wcc.413. For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website.
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During the last decade (2005–2015), artists from all over the world have taken on climate change as the subject matter of their work. Encouraged by activists (most notably Bill McKibben), artists have appropriated climate change as a social problem and decided that they too, alongside journalists, scientists, and activists, were called upon to engage with this issue. Dozens of noteworthy exhibitions, most notably in Boulder (2007), London and Copenhagen (2009), Paris (2012), New York (2013), Boston (2014), and Melbourne (2015), have placed climate change art on the map as a new and timely genre, displaying relevant artworks both alongside climate negotiations and in dedicated gallery spaces such as the Barbican in London. I argue that much progress has been made in appropriating climate change art as an essentially artistic, rather than propagandistic or activist practice. Although caught in the net of many criticisms, climate change art plays a crucial role in allowing the public to rethink the role of human beings’ everyday activities in irrevocably altering the climate system. In effect, climate change art makes the Anthropocene a cultural reality. However, the review points out a strong artistic trend toward the imagery of apocalyptic sublime, which results in art that may be poignant, but falls out of step with the self‐professed motivations of artists and curators alike. WIREs Clim Change 2016, 7:501–516. doi: 10.1002/wcc.400 This article is categorized under: • Trans‐Disciplinary Perspectives > Humanities and the Creative Arts
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There is growing recognition of the role of values and visioning for transdisciplinary co-production of knowledge and social transformation. Mapping and deliberating values and envisioning desirable futures are seen as important aspects of transformational learning. TCHANGE (Addressing the Climate Crisis through Value Transformation) aimed to examine how values and anticipating future pathways could be assessed in collaboration with transformational communities. Initially, researchers and practitioners from five countries had divergent views about methodological standards, reflecting distinct ontologies and asymmetrical power relations within the team. However, the emerging tension between scientific rigor, societal relevance, and experiential learning proved productive for flexibility in the problem framing and team building phase of the transdisciplinary co-design process.
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Arts Based Research is ideal for students, researchers, and practitioners. This unique book provides a framework for broadening the domain of qualitative inquiry in the social sciences by incorporating the arts as a means of better understanding and rethinking important social issues. In the book's 10 thought-provoking chapters, authors Tom Barone and Elliot W. Eisner--pioneers in the field--address key aspects of arts based research, including its purpose and fundamental ideas, controversies that surround the field and the politics and ethics involved, and key criteria for evaluation.
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Climate change is not just a scientific fact, nor merely a social and political problem. It is also a set of stories and characters that amount to a social drama. This drama, as much as hard scientific or political realities, shapes perception of the problem. Drs Smith and Howe use the perspective of cultural sociology and Aristotle's timeless theories about narrative and rhetoric to explore this meaningful and visible surface of climate change in the public sphere. Whereas most research wants to explain barriers to awareness, here we switch the agenda to look at the moments when global warming actually gets attention. Chapters consider struggles over apocalyptic scenarios, explain the success of Al Gore and An Inconvenient Truth, unpack the deeper social meanings of the climate conference and 'Climategate', critique failed advertising campaigns and climate art, and question the much touted transformative potential of natural disasters such as Superstorm Sandy.
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An analysis of why people with knowledge about climate change often fail to translate that knowledge into action. © 2011 Massachusetts Institute of Technology. All rights reserved.
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Mediating Climate Change explores how practices of mediation and visualisation shape how we think about, address and act upon climate change. Through historical and contemporary case studies drawn from science, media, politics and culture, Doyle identifies the representational problems climate change poses for public and political debate. She explores how climate change can be made more meaningful and calls for a more nuanced understanding of human-environmental relations.
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This book presents a new perspective on adaptation to climate change. It considers climate change as more than a problem that can be addressed solely through technical expertise. Instead, it approaches climate change as an adaptive challenge that is fundamentally linked to beliefs, values and worldviews, as well as to power, politics, identities and interests. Drawing on case studies from high-income countries, the book argues that it is time to consider adaptation to climate change as a challenge of social, personal and political transformations. The authors represent a variety of fields and perspectives, illustrating the importance of interdisciplinary approaches to the problem. The book will be of interest to researchers, policy makers and advanced students in the environmental sciences, social sciences and humanities, as well as to decision makers and practitioners interested in new ideas about adapting to climate change.
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The concept of panarchy provides a framework that characterizes complex systems of people and nature as dynamically organized and structured within and across scales of space and time. It has been more than a decade since the introduction of panarchy. Over this period, its invocation in peer-reviewed literature has been steadily increasing, but its use remains primarily descriptive and abstract. Here, we discuss the use of the concept in the literature to date, highlight where the concept may be useful, and discuss limitations to the broader applicability of panarchy theory for research in the ecological and social sciences. Finally, we forward a set of testable hypotheses to evaluate key propositions that follow from panarchy theory.
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The uncertainties concerning climate change debated daily in the media polarize political leaders and the general public alike. While daily weather is something that can be experienced by everyone and changes in the weather can be accounted for within the timeframe of a human lifetime, climate change is more difficult to comprehend or connect with in an appreciable way because of its remoteness in time and unpredictability. General populations can be alienated by the overwhelming proliferation of scientific data and statistics and, in the face of potentially cataclysmic events, feel paralyzed and incapable of action. Scientific evidence alone may not be working to encourage or initiate changes in behaviors with the potential to curtail the perceived changes to life as we know it. This paper sets out to explicate alternative ways of comprehending and addressing some of the complex problems of climate change through art by focusing on the ways people perceive and sense the changing world around them. It contends that artists have the potential to engage society in emotional and experiential ways to promote behavioral and cognitive change. Drawing on the work of certain artists and art commentators, this paper argues that, far from being a purely imaginative or aesthetic activity, art is integral to meaningful communication between humans and the changing world.