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OER for Inclusive and Equitable Quality Education: From Commitment to Action

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  • Commonwealth of Learning
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OER for Inclusive and Equitable Quality Education: From Commitment to Action

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Presented by Professor Asha Kanwar, President & CEO, Commonwealth of Learning, Dr. Sanjaya Mishra, COL, and Dr. Ishan Abeywardena, COL, at the Asia Open Educational Resources Regional Consultation, 1 December 2016, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.
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OER for Inclusive and Equitable Quality Education:
From Commitment to Action
Professor Asha Kanwar, Sanjaya Mishra and Ishan Abeyawardena
Commonwealth of Learning
Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia | December 1, 2016
Asia
Malaysia
Europe
Malta
Middle East /
North Africa
Qatar
Africa
Mauritius
Americas
Brazil
Pacific
New Zealand
World OER Congress Paris 2012
Sir John Daniel, Former President of COL The Congress at UNESCO HQ Paris
Image source (CC-BY): http://www.unesco.org/new/en/communication-and-information/resources/multimedia/photo-galleries/open-educational-resources/world-open-educational-resources-congress-in-photos/
Paris OER Declaration 2012
Foster awareness and use of OER;
Reinforce the development of
strategies and policies on OER;
Promote the understanding and use
of open licensing frameworks;
Support capacity building for the
sustainable development of quality
learning materials.
Photo: CC-BY Davide Storti
The 2012 Paris OER Declaration
drafting group at UNESCO
Headquarters, Paris, France
2nd World OER Congress
Ljubljana, Slovenia 18-20 September 2017
Image Source (CC BY):https://www.flickr.com
The Road to Ljubljana
EUROPE
Malta Ministry for Education and Employment
23-24 February, 2017
AFRICA
Ministry of Education
2-3 March, 2017
PACIFIC
Open Polytechnic of New Zealand
29-30 May, 2017
ASIA
Asia e University
1-2 December, 2016
MIDDLE EAST & NORTH AFRICA
Qatar Foundation
26-27 February, 2017
AMERICAS
UNICAMP
3-4 April, 2017
Task Team
Steering Committee
Partners
OER: Then and Now
2012 Now
Focus was on Governments Additional focus on
stakeholders
Policies Strategies
Commitment Concrete action
Objectives of RCOER
Raise regional awareness about the importance of
OER and its relationship to SDG4;
Explore mechanisms to facilitate the mainstreaming of
OER;
Identify strategies and solutions to overcome the
challenges or barriers to mainstreaming OER; and,
Agree on actions for consideration at the 2nd World
OER Congress.
Two Surveys
• A government survey sent by COL to Member States
UNESCO to send in English & French
A stakeholder survey, which COL posted online at
http://rcoer.col.org/surveys.html and publicized via
social media.
Government Responses
Region Government
Africa
3
Arab
States 0
Asia
and Pacific 6
Europe
and North America 1
Latin
America and Caribbean 2
Stakeholder Responses
89 completed stakeholder survey responses
received.
Region Stakeholder
Africa
10
Arab
States 4
Asia
and Pacific 41
Europe
and North America 31
Latin
America and Caribbean 3
Key Findings from Government Survey
Only 12 responses to date
7 respondents indicated that their country has a
policy
6 respondents (4 in Asia) felt that there are sufficient
OER in the main language(s) of education in their
country.
7 respondents (4 from Asia) felt that their country
addressed issues of quality assurance related to
OER.
Trends (Government Survey)
OER activities mostly at post-secondary and
tertiary levels
Main reasons for countries becoming active in
OER were:
Gaining access to the best possible resources
Bringing down costs for students
Reaching disadvantaged communities
Creating more flexible materials
OER improves teacher professional development
Trends (Government Survey)
Main barriers to mainstreaming OER are:
Lack of users’ capacity to access, reuse and share OER,
Lack of funding and/or incentives; and
Lack of appropriate policy solutions.
Main challenge to translating OER into local language
relates to costs and lack of skills
Key skills gaps identified were:
How to find OER;
Evaluating usefulness, value, and quality of OER;
Understanding licences and how they work;
ICT Skills.
Trends (Stakeholder Survey)
49% Male and 51% Female
87% were aware of OER activities in their country
Almost a third (31%) noted good access to teaching and
learning material
76% reported have reused OER, 61% having adapted/remixed
OER, and 57% have released original content as OER
67% report using a Creative Commons licence, but 28% not
using any licence
Trends (Stakeholder Survey)
General positive attitude towards OER; for example:
OER lower the cost of learning materials (89%)
Open licensing of learning materials enables continuous
quality improvements (85%)
OER assist developing countries in accessing quality
materials (83%)
Most common barriers to OER use:
No support from management level (64%)
No reward system for staff (60%)
Governments and Stakeholders
What are the Commonalities?
Has the potential to lower cost of learning materials
Enables continuous quality improvement
Provides access to quality materials
Lack of funding and/or incentives is a barrier
Lack of support from management
Appropriate policy solutions is a concern
Governments and Stakeholders
Engagement with Private Sector
Across both surveys, many respondents felt there
would be challenges for stakeholders in balancing
OER with commercial interests (48% of
stakeholders and 82% of government survey
respondents)
Challenges focused on uneasiness in sharing IP
and resultant threats to industries whose
business model is based on selling IP
The Way Forward
More data collection
Regional Analysis for each Consultation
Global report preparation
Recommendations of the Paris OER Declaration
1. Foster awareness and use of
OER;
2. Support capacity building for
the sustainable development
of quality learning materials;
3. Promote the understanding
and use of open licensing
Frameworks;
4. Facilitate the finding, retrieving
and sharing of OER.
Uneven awareness
of OER
General belief that
OER empowers
teachers
Only about 50%
trained in practice
Perceptions of good
quality and cost-
efficiency among
majority
Gap between theory
and practice
Lack of information
on quality
Scarcity of OER in
video and audio
format
Still no concrete
action to address
challenges
Most people
prefer OER in text
format
Prefer easy to
download content
Majority find
OER through
Google while
22% access
through
repositories
Progress after 2012?
More policiesinstitutional level
More awareness about the benefits of OER
More champions and advocates
More content availablerepositories
Better ICT infrastructure and connectivity
What next?
Evidence-based advocacy
More capacity building
Continue to share experiences across countries
and regions
Targeted interventions
Thank you
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