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Revised Classification, Nomenclator and Typification of Gastropod and Monoplacophoran Families

Authors:
  • Leibniz Institute for the Analysis of Biodiversity Change (LIB)

Abstract

2,604 names at the rank of subtribe, tribe, subfamily, family and superfamily have been proposed for Recent and fossil gastropods, and another 35 for monoplacophorans. All names are listed in a nomenclator giving full bibliographical reference, date of publication, typification, and their nomenclatural availability and validity under the International Code of Zoological Nomenclature. Another 790 names, established for categories above the familygroup (infraorder to subclass) are listed separately. A fully ranked, hierarchical classification summarizes recent advances in the phylogeny of the Gastropoda and Monoplacophora. In all, the classification recognizes as valid a total of 721 gastropod families, of which 245 are known exclusively as fossils and 476 occur in the Recent with or without a fossil record; and 20 monoplacophoran families, of which 1 only occurs as Recent. Nomenclatural acts in this work: Amberleya bathonica Cox & Arkell, 1950, fixed as type species of Amberleya J. Morris & Lycett, 1851, under Art. 70.3; Ampezzopleura tenuis Nützel, 1998, fixed as type species of Ampezzopleura Bandel, 1991, under Art. 70.3; Proserpina nitida G. B. Sowerby II, 1839, designated type species of Despoena Newton, 1891; Buccinum glabratum Linnaeus, 1758, designated type species of Dipsaccus H. Adams & A. Adams, 1853; Murex ficus Linnaeus, 1758, designated type species of Ficula Swainson, 1835; Oncomelania hupensis Gredler, 1881, designated type species of Hemibia Heude, 1890; Murex metaxa Delle Chiaje, 1828, fixed as type species of Metaxia Monterosato, 1884 under Art. 70.3; Neridomus anglicus Cox & Arkell, 1950, fixed as type species of Neridomus J. Morris & Lycett, 1851, under Art. 70.3; Navicella clypeolum Récluz, 1843, designated type species of Orthopoma Gray, 1868; Trochus viadrinus M. Schmidt, 1905, fixed as type species of Parataphrus Chavan, 1954 under Art. 70.3; Helix pomatia Linnaeus, 1758, designated type species of Pentataenia A. Schmidt, 1855; Flammulina ponsonbyi Suter, 1897, fixed as type species of Phenacohelix Suter, 1892, under Art. 70.3; Cyrtolites corniculum Eichwald, 1860, fixed as type species of Pollicina Koken, 1895, under Art. 70.3; Purpurina elegantula d'Orbigny, 1850, designated as type species of Purpurina d'Orbigny, 1850, and lectotype of Turbo bellona d'Orbigny, 1850, designated as neotype of Purpurina elegantula; Pyramidella minuscula Monterosato, 1880, fixed as type species of Tiberia Jeffreys, 1884, under Art. 70.3; Cyclostoma delicatum Philippi, 1844, fixed as type species of Trachysma G. O. Sars, 1878, under Art. 70.3; Helix elegans Gmelin, 1791, fixed as type species of Trochoidea T. Brown, 1827, under Art. 70.3; Turritellopsis stimpsoni Dall, 1919, fixed as type species of Turritellopsis G. O. Sars, 1878, under Art. 70.3; Fusus averillii Gabb, 1864, fixed as type species of Volutoderma Gabb, 1876, under Art. 70.3; Voluta pepo Lightfoot, 1786, fixed as type species of Yetus Bowdich, 1822. Curnonidae d'Udekem d'Acoz, nom. nov., and Curnon d'Udekem d'Acoz, nom. nov., are established for Charcotiidae Odhner, 1926, and Charcotia Vayssière, 1906, (between 27 March and 1 May), non Charcotia Chevreux, 1906 (January) [Amphipoda]; Yuopisthonematidae Nützel, nom. nov., and Yuopisthonema Nützel, nom. nov., are established for Opisthonematidae Yu, 1976, and Opisthonema Yu, 1974, non Gill, 1862 [Pisces]. The new family-group name Burnupiidae Albrecht is established in this work; and the names Scolodontina and Orthalicoidei are first used here to denote, respectively, a suborder containing the family Scolodontidae, and an infraorder containing the superfamily Orthalicoidea.
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... The systematics in this chapter are basically those from the nomenclator of Bouchet et al. (2017) with additions from newer literature, and the World Register of Marine Taxa (http://www.marinespecies.org/) kept up to date by their editors. ...
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Chapter
Gastropods are one of the most important groups of organisms adapted to chemosynthesis-based communities. A list of gastropod occurrences in ancient hydrocarbon seeps is provided in this chapter, and the most important taxa common at seeps are discussed in more detail. The fossil record shows that the trochomorph gastropods are already known from Paleozoic seeps and vents though they are poorly preserved and thus researched. Already in Late Triassic seeps, gastropods are well diversified, including the first possible abyssochrysoids. The Jurassic and Cretaceous were times of abyssochrysoid dominance in seep and vent gastropod communities not only in number of taxa but also in number of individuals. Two new families (Desbruyeresidae and Rubyspiridae) and one new subfamily (Alviniconchinae) are described. It is suggested that the latter belongs to Paskentanidae. The oldest report of neomphalid gastropods in seeps is from the Jurassic though their diversity is rather restricted and apparently they are absent at Mesozoic vents. Most likely, the neomphalid radiation in vents came much later. Limpet-shaped gastropods occur at seeps already in the Jurassic but became common only in Late Cretaceous as is the case of the colloniid vetigastropods. Though known from the Late Cretaceous, neogastropods appear in larger numbers in Oligocene seeps.KeywordsGastropodsAbyssochrysoideaHokkaidoconchidaeProvannidaePaskentanidaeNeomphalidaeLimpetsSeguenziidaCataegidaeColloniidaeNeogastropodaChemosymbiosis
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... et A. P. Covich (1991)[1], D. C. [2,3], P.Bouchet et al. (2005Bouchet et al. ( , 2017 [4][5][6], A.Breure (1979) [7], A. F.Bogan et al. (1993Bogan et al. ( , 2006Bogan et al. ( , 2017 [8-10], A. Cuttelod et al. (2011) [11] проводились исследования по изучению гидробионтов. Среди ученых СНГ, таких как, Я. И. Старобогатов и др. ...
... et A. P. Covich (1991)[1], D. C. [2,3], P.Bouchet et al. (2005Bouchet et al. ( , 2017 [4][5][6], A.Breure (1979) [7], A. F.Bogan et al. (1993Bogan et al. ( , 2006Bogan et al. ( , 2017 [8-10], A. Cuttelod et al. (2011) [11] проводились исследования по изучению гидробионтов. Среди ученых СНГ, таких как, Я. И. Старобогатов и др. ...
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... Miller, 1879 ;Pilsbry, 1889Pilsbry, -1890Pilsbry, , 1906Pilsbry, -1907Pilsbry, , 1920Pilsbry, , 1946Baker, 1925 ;Bartsch & Morrison, 1942 ;Bequaert, 1948 ;Solem, 1966 ;Kerney & Cameron, 1979 ;Thompson, 1980 ;Hausdorf, 2003Hausdorf, , 2007Simone, 2006 ;Breure & Mogollón Avila, 2016 ) and/or comparison with reference shell collections of taxa from Ecuador and surrounding countries. The higher-level classification follows Bouchet et al. (2017) . ...
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Vetigastropoda, comprising marine gastropods of both snail-like and limpet-like form, were common during the Palaeozoic and remain so in modern marine environments. The most resolved molecular phylogenetic study to date at the family level in Vetigastropoda was based on molecular data of complete mitochondrial genomes, but only 15 mitochondrial genomes are available and the taxonomic coverage remains insufficient to resolve many systematic questions. Notably, among the vetigastropod superfamilies, 'Trochoidea' is the most diverse, but no mitogenome has been yet published for its representative family Trochidae. We here provided eight newly reconstructed mitogenomes from the following vetigastropods: Angaria delphinus, Phasianella australis, Astralium haematragum, Lunella granulata, Chlorostoma argyrostomum, Omphalius nigerrimus, Stomatella planulata and Variegemarginula punctata. Stomatella planulata is the first available mitogenome for Trochidae. Our analyses of the extended mitogenome dataset show that the two trochoid families Turbinidae and Tegulidae group together, while their relationship to Trochidae (represented by S. planulata) is uncertain. Within the Tegulidae, monophyly of the genus Tegula is not recovered. The analysis with additional fissurelloid mitogenome confirms that within Vetigastropoda this superfamily is a distinct clade. Except for V. punctata the mitogenomes reconstructed show the ancestral gene order for Vetigastropoda. The additional fissurelloid mitogenome reveals that gene order in Fissurelloidea is variable, which might suggest a faster rate of mitochondrial evolution that in turn may cause artefacts in phylogenetic analyses. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Malacological Society of London, all rights reserved.
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Three new species of Venustatrochus Powell, 1951, V. eclectus n. sp., V. galateae n. sp. and V. youngi n. sp. are described from New Zealand, and Calliostoma (Benthastelena) malaita Vilvens, 2009 from the Solomon Islands and Norfolk Ridge and C. atlantis Clench & Aguayo, 1940 from off Cuba are referred to the genus. The radula of the type species of Otukaia, O. kiheiziebisu (Otuka, 1939), is illustrated, and O. ikukoae Sakurai, 1994 is resurrected from synonymy under O. kiheiziebisu and transferred to Tristichotrochus Ikebe, 1942. Benthastelena Iredale, 1936, Fautor Iredale, 1924 and Maurea Oliver, 1926 are each assigned genus rank in Calliostomatinae, and Alertalex Dell, 1956 is treated as a subgenus of Maurea. The South American species Otukaia chilena (Rehder, 1971) and O. delli (McLean & Andrade, 1982), the western subantarctic species O. eltanini Dell, 1990 and Calliostoma muriellae Vilvens, 2001 from Madagascar are referred to Maurea. Otukaia crustulum Vilvens & Sellanes, 2006 is referred to Calliotropis L. Seguenza, 1903 (Calliotropidae). Six new species of Falsimargarita Powell, 1951 are described—F. callista n. sp., F. challengerica n. sp., F. eximia n. sp. and F. tangaroa n. sp., from New Zealand, F. kapala n. sp. from southeastern Australia, and F. coriolis n. sp. from New Caledonia. Calliostoma atlantoides Quinn, 1992 and C. coronatum Quinn, 1992 from off the Lesser Antilles and Brazil, respectively, are referred to Falsimargarita. Phenacomargarites n. gen. is introduced for P. williamsae n. sp. from the Solomon Islands, and P. incomptus n. sp. and P. titan n. sp. from the New Zealand region. Phenacomargarites, Falsimargarita, Selastele Marshall, 1995 and Fautrix Marshall, 1995 are referred to subfamily Fautricinae Marshall, 1995 (elevated from tribe level). http://zoobank.org/urn:lsid:zoobank.org:pub:09EAD861-3B62-42F9-BCC1-453EBE1347D4 © 2016 The Malacological Society of Australasia and the Society for the Study of Molluscan Diversity
Article
The Rissooidea is an evolutionarily ancient and mega-diverse group of marine micro-gastropods that occur from intertidal to deep waters at all latitudes. Their current systematics is predominantly based on phenetic grounds and there has been no comprehensive molecular phylogeny. Based on sequences of mitochondrial and nuclear DNA from the most complete sampling of Rissoidae to date, this work represents the first treatment of the group performed through a phylogenetic approach. The main goals are to clarify the phylogenetic position of the Rissoidae, investigate the relationships within rissoid taxa and test the utility of some diagnostic morphological traits. Our phylogeny indicates that the Rissoidae are one of six distinct family-lineages within the superfamily Rissooidea (along with Barleeiidae, Emblandidae, Lironobidae, Rissoinidae and Zebinidae) whose recognition is supported by several synapomorphies. While most of the characters studied exhibit widespread convergence, some others prove useful in separating genera and broader taxonomic groups. The relationships among rissoid taxa challenge the current systematics, indicating the non-monophyly of some genera with purportedly transoceanic distribution and the need of taxonomic revision for some highly diverse genera. Our phylogeny suggests that the Rissoidae originated in shallow seas and independently radiated into bathyal waters at least twice.