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PRZESTRZEŃ I MIEJSCE W PRAKTYCE ARTYSTYCZNEJ Socjologiczne studium przypadku

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Abstract and Figures

The presented case study is based on the theatrical action "Moving!" by Weronika Fibich. It is an example of a site-specific activity, but also containing elements of other types of public art. This action takes place in a specific space chosen by the artist and conceptually connected with this space. The place is Niebuszewo - Szczecin district with a rather confused history, once gathering multi-ethnic and multicultural population. After second world war a large part of new settlers arrived there, mainly Poles and Jews, exchanging at the same time with the displaced German population (Szczecin is an example of a "city with mentioned blood", as Maria Lewicka described it, 2012). Their basic task in the new reality became the tame of foreign space through the arduous process of "settle", lined with a sense of temporality and strengthened by prolonged difficulties in establishing the boundaries and belonging of Szczecin.
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