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Process of Reconciliation in the Western Balkans and Turkey: A Qualitative Study

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The book Process of Reconciliation in the Western Balkans and Turkey: A Qualitative Study contains results of the qualitative research that was conducted in Bosnia and Herzegovina, Montenegro, Serbia, Kosovo, Macedonia, Albania and Turkey. Subject of the research involved attitudes and opinions of citizens, representatives of public, private and civil sector on peace building and the process of reconciliation as well as the role of civil sector in those processes in the mentioned countries. After the introductory part based on the synthesis of secondary data on the political and social context of each country, the findings of empirical research are divided into five parts, following the questions asked to respondents in focus groups. It begins with the conceptualization of the notion of reconciliation, i.e. presentation of various perspectives and narratives of the participants. The analysis ends with recapitulation, extraction of the most interesting or most relevant findings, as well as specific recommendations for each country for the purpose of promoting the process of reconciliation.
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