Article

A “Priest King” at Shahr-i Sokhta?

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Abstract

The paper discusses the published fragment of a statuette made of a buff-grey limestone, recently found on the surface of Shahr-i Sokhta (Sistan, Iran) and currently on exhibit in a showcase of the archaeological Museum of Zahedan (Sistan-Baluchistan, Iran). Most probably, it belongs to a sculptural type well known in some sites of Middle and South Asia dating to the late 3rd-early 2nd millennium BCE - a male character sitting on the right heel, with the left hand on the raised left knee, and a robe leaving bare the left shoulder. Preliminary comments on the cultural, historical and chronological implications of this important find are included.

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... The possible historical linkage between the Harappa-style sun-like ornament and the traditional Hidu bindi will be discussed later in Subsection 4.5.2 231 See, for example,Vidale (2018), for one that was found in Sistan, Iran in the late 2010s. ...
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本英文稿较早版本的中文版由中央党校出版集团-国家行政管理出版社出版。/// 西方主流世界史或其它类似教科书对人类自身因素和环境因素在世界文明发展过程中所起的的作用进行了高度简化,甚至对一些核心内容还有曲解。 本书利用早期出现的象形、会意等符号和人类共祖词概念,重新解读并再现了世界六大土著(或本土)文明——即美索不达米亚、古埃及、哈拉帕(印度河流域)、中国、中美洲和南美洲安第斯文明——的形成与发展轨迹。本书的叙事和分析主要集中在历史地理学和人类行为学两个层面上。本书以全新的视角,对目前西方主流教科书所介绍的看似无任何争议的观点和内容展开讨论,所呈现的许多发现是基于作者长期对各种古文字和人类共祖语言的研究。本书得出的许多结论有些出乎意料,但都是建立在严谨的逻辑判断或可靠的实证分析的基础之上。所有这些内容在目前流行的教科书中是看不到的,但却是人文特别是历史学学生需要了解的内容。
... 352 The possible historical linkage between the Harappa-style sun-like ornament and the traditional Hidu bindi will be discussed later in Subsection 4.5.1. Statuettes dating to the late third or early second millennium BC, which has also been found in some sites of East and South Asia, include similar sun-like ornamentssee, for example, Vidale (2018), for one that was found in Sistan, Iran in the late 2010s. ...
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