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Abstract

p>In the last issue’s editorial, “Five Dimensions of Online Persona” (Moore, Barbour and Lee 2017), we turned our attention to the proliferation of public identities through online platforms, and traced key nodes of research that inform how we think about and theorise online personas. We also proposed and outlined five primary dimensions to the online persona that we characterised as public, mediatised, performative, collective, and having intentional value. The scope of that work was deliberately broad and far-reaching—we envisioned that piece as neither tool nor template but, we hoped, a conceptual starting point for further thinking and research. In this editorial we seek to continue that work by putting these theoretical foundations and concepts into practice through a study of the persona work of Instagram. This work constitutes, in many cases, significant labour: decisions are made and remade around sharing different types of images, along with the use of hashtags, framing, timing, filters, captions, or tags. Abidin (2016, p. 90) describes this as “visibility labour”, which is “the work individuals do when they self-posture and curate their self-presentations so as to be noticeable and positively prominent” to their audiences or micro-publics, and notes that the labour itself becomes invisible in the persona creation process. This distributed visibility labour forms the basis of persona work, where users and their micro-publics, in conjunction with the platform and the algorithms that drive it, are continually iterating on the persona that is produced. </p
This paper is available open access through the Persona Studies online journal here:
https://ojs.deakin.edu.au/index.php/ps/article/view/710/651
Kim Barbour
... ). Recent studies on travel selfies have used Instagram(Barbour, Lee, & Moore, 2017;Masip et al., 2018;Wijesinghe, Mura, & Tavakoli, 2020), arguing that it simplifies data collection and provides more information for similar studies than other social networks(Rokka & Canniford, 2016).A list of 24 hashtags with the names of the top 10 most visited places in Barcelona were used to gather data. According to the 2019 Annual Tourism Report (Observatori del Turisme a Barcelona, 2020) the top attractions are Sagrada Familia, Park Güell, FC Museum Barcelona, Aquarium, The Born Cultural Centre, Spanish Town, La Pedrera, Casa Batlló, Barcelona Zoo, and Picasso Museum Barcelona(Table 1). ...
... According to the 2019 Annual Tourism Report (Observatori del Turisme a Barcelona, 2020) the top attractions are Sagrada Familia, Park Güell, FC Museum Barcelona, Aquarium, The Born Cultural Centre, Spanish Town, La Pedrera, Casa Batlló, Barcelona Zoo, and Picasso Museum Barcelona(Table 1). Following previous studies(Barbour, et al. 2017;Masip et al., 2018), the Websta Instagram Analytics platform was used to gather information from Instagram. This platform allows getting access to the pictures shared in Instagram by date of publication. ...
... Snapshot-style images often feature pets, family members and children within the home. It is unsurprising that a majority of images in the data set are snapshot style, given that the bulk of Instagram users are not trained professionals and are taking and uploading images using smartphones (Barbour et al., 2017); indeed the vast majority of the more than one billion active users of Instagram (Statista, 2019) are everyday users rather than professional or even hobby photographers, so it makes sense that this data set would heavily represent this cohort. As noted by Manovich (2016) 'the majority of Instagram publicly shared images show moments in the "ordinary" lives of hundreds of millions of people using the network globally' (p. ...
... For example, one user who uploaded an image of a kitten captioned the photograph anthropomorphically, with the kitten cutely promising to have behaved itself while she was out of the house. This mirrors Barbour's earlier findings related to images of pets who were photographed watching television (Barbour et al., 2017), as well as the popular belief that cats dominate the Internet (Eppink in Kingson, 2015). There is also a connection between the traditionalist 'home sweet home' idiom, with its history in needlework samplers and other forms of feminised domesticity, and pets as companion-possessions that are usually soft, fluffy and pleasant to be around; both represent comfortable domestic life. ...
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