ArticlePDF Available

Abstract and Figures

Introdução, tradução e notas: Antonio Brancaglion Junior.
No caption available
… 
No caption available
… 
No caption available
… 
No caption available
… 
No caption available
… 
Content may be subject to copyright.
A preview of the PDF is not available
ResearchGate has not been able to resolve any citations for this publication.
Article
First published in 1973 - and followed by Volume II in 1976 and Volume III in 1980 - this anthology has assumed classic status in the field of Egyptology and portrays the remarkable evolution of the literary forms of one of the world's earliest civilizations. Volume I outlines the early and gradual evolution of Egyptian literary genres, including biographical and historical inscriptions carved on stone, the various classes of literary works written with pen on papyrus, and the mortuary literature that focuses on life after death. Introduced with a new foreword by Antonio Loprieno. Volume II shows the culmination of these literary genres within the single period known as the New Kingdom (1550-1080 B.C.). With a new foreword by Hans-W. Fischer-Elfert. Volume III spans the last millennium of Pharaonic civilization, from the tenth century B.C. to the beginning of the Christian era. With a new foreword by Joseph G. Manning.
Article
The story of the Shipwrecked Sailor is a complex work of written literature that is based partly on esoteric knowledge. Its superficial presentation looks to folk and oral models in style, situation, anonymity, and treatment of character, making play with traditional and proverbial wisdom. It is not allegorical in any simple sense. The conception of the seventy-four forms of the sun god is encapsulated within the folk/oral treatment, while the deviant wisdom that offerings to the gods are pointless is relativized by being put forward by a god. The core narrative of the end of things is a myth that is linked to moralizing on a modest, domestic scale; this pairing has parallels in religious texts. All these meanings are organized within a cyclical form which exploits first-person narration for ironical effect. The text is not didactic in any simple sense, but has the unifying theme of experience and how it is confronted.
nome provavelmente designava tanto o Papio anúbis como o Papio hamadryas
nome provavelmente designava tanto o Papio anúbis como o Papio hamadryas. Osborn (1998): 32-39.
Middle-Egyptian Stories
  • A M Blackman
Blackman, A. M., 1933. "Middle-Egyptian Stories", em Bibliotheca Aegyptiaca II, p. 41-48.
Egyptian Reading book. Exercises and Middle Egyptian Texts
  • A De Buck
de Buck, A., 1948. Egyptian Reading book. Exercises and Middle Egyptian Texts. Chicago: Aris Publishers Inc.
The Shipwrecked Sailor: Prose or Verse ?
  • J L Foster
Foster, J. L., 1988. "The Shipwrecked Sailor: Prose or Verse ?", em Studien zur altägyptischen Kultur, 15, p. 69-109.
Zur Interpretation der Geschichte des Schiffbrüchigen
  • D Kurth
Kurth, D., 1987. "Zur Interpretation der Geschichte des Schiffbrüchigen", em Studien zur altägyptischen Kultur, 14, p. 161-179.
) hekenu, iudeneb, (188) khesait, tishepes 80 , shaasekh 81
  • De Mirra
de mirra, (187) hekenu, iudeneb, (188) khesait, tishepes 80, shaasekh 81, (189) galena 82, caudas de girafa,
  • Cercopithecus
  • Vandier
Cercopithecus aethiops, também conhecido como vervet. Vandier, RdE, 16 (1964): 151.