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MRI and stereo vision surface reconstruction and fusion

Conference Paper

MRI and stereo vision surface reconstruction and fusion

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... Carter et al. [17], [18] present the first attempt of providing image guidance during breast surgery based on a patient-specific biomechanical model. El Chemaly et al. [19] undertake a similar approach that involves a stereoscopic camera system and the computation of disparity maps to account for soft tissue deformation between prone MR imaging and surgery. ...
Conference Paper
A biopsy is the only diagnostic procedure for accurate histological confirmation of breast cancer. When sonographic placement is not feasible, a Magnetic Resonance Imaging(MRI)-guided biopsy is often preferred. The lack of real-time imaging information and the deformations of the breast make it challenging to bring the needle precisely towards the tumour detected in pre-interventional Magnetic Resonance (MR) images. The current manual MRI-guided biopsy workflow is inaccurate and would benefit from a technique that allows real-time tracking and localisation of the tumour lesion during needle insertion. This paper proposes a robotic setup and software architecture to assist the radiologist in targeting MR-detected suspicious tumours. The approach benefits from image fusion of preoperative images with intraoperative optical tracking of markers attached to the patient’s skin. A hand-mounted biopsy device has been constructed with an actuated needle base to drive the tip toward the desired direction. The steering commands may be provided both by user input and by computer guidance. The workflow is validated through phantom experiments. On average, the suspicious breast lesion is targeted with a radius down to 2.3 mm. The results suggest that robotic systems taking into account breast deformations have the potentials to tackle this clinical challenge.
... Carter et al. [15], [16] present the first attempt of providing image guidance during breast surgery based on a patient-specific biomechanical model. El Chemaly et al. [17] undertake a similar approach that involves a stereoscopic camera system and the computation of disparity maps to account for soft tissue deformation between prone MR imaging and surgery. ...
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A biopsy is the only diagnostic procedure for accurate histological confirmation of breast cancer. When sonographic placement is not feasible, a Magnetic Resonance Imaging(MRI)-guided biopsy is often preferred. The lack of real-time imaging information and the deformations of the breast make it challenging to bring the needle precisely towards the tumour detected in pre-interventional Magnetic Resonance (MR) images. The current manual MRI-guided biopsy workflow is inaccurate and would benefit from a technique that allows real-time tracking and localisation of the tumour lesion during needle insertion. This paper proposes a robotic setup and software architecture to assist the radiologist in targeting MR-detected suspicious tumours. The approach benefits from image fusion of preoperative images with intraoperative optical tracking of markers attached to the patient's skin. A hand-mounted biopsy device has been constructed with an actuated needle base to drive the tip toward the desired direction. The steering commands may be provided both by user input and by computer guidance. The workflow is validated through phantom experiments. On average, the suspicious breast lesion is targeted with a radius down to 2.3 mm. The results suggest that robotic systems taking into account breast deformations have the potentials to tackle this clinical challenge.
... 25 shows a photo of an actual setup andFigure 10.26 shows the pressure-force graph for this specific motor. It can be observed that there is a good linear relationship between pressure and force, with a maximum of 62 N at a pressure of 0.65 MPa. ...
Article
Percutaneous abdominal puncture is a popular interventional method for the management of abdominal tumors. Image-guided puncture can help interventional radiologists improve targeting accuracy. The second generation of Kinect(™) was released recently, we developed an optical navigation system to investigate its feasibility for guiding percutaneous abdominal puncture, and compare its performance on needle insertion guidance with that of the first-generation Kinect(™). For physical-to-image registration in this system, two surfaces extracted from preoperative CT and intraoperative Kinect(™) depth images were matched using an iterative closest point (ICP) algorithm. A 2D shape image-based correspondence searching algorithm was proposed for generating a close initial position before ICP matching. Evaluation experiments were conducted on an abdominal phantom and six beagles in vivo. For phantom study, a two-factor experiment was designed to evaluate the effect of the operator's skill and trajectory on target positioning error (TPE). A total of 36 needle punctures were tested on a Kinect(™) for Windows version 2 (Kinect(™) V2). The target registration error (TRE), user error, and TPE are 4.26 ± 1.94 mm, 2.92 ± 1.67 mm, and 5.23 ± 2.29 mm, respectively. No statistically significant differences in TPE regarding operator's skill and trajectory are observed. Additionally, a Kinect(™) for Windows version 1 (Kinect(™) V1) was tested with 12 insertions, and the TRE evaluated with the Kinect(™) V1 is statistically significantly larger than that with the Kinect(™) V2. For the animal experiment, fifteen artificial liver tumors were inserted guided by the navigation system. The TPE was evaluated as 6.40 ± 2.72 mm, and its lateral and longitudinal component were 4.30 ± 2.51 mm and 3.80 ± 3.11 mm, respectively. This study demonstrates that the navigation accuracy of the proposed system is acceptable, and that the second generation Kinect(™)-based navigation is superior to the first-generation Kinect(™), and has potential of clinical application in percutaneous abdominal puncture.
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Radio-frequency ablation is a difficult operative task that requires a precise needle positioning in the centre of the pathology. This article presents an augmented reality system for hepatic therapy guidance that superimposes in real-time 3D reconstructions (from CT acquisition) and a virtual model of the needle on external views of a patient. The superimposition of reconstructed models is performed with a 3D/2D registration based on radio-opaque markers stuck on to the patient's skin. The characteristics of the problem (accuracy, robustness and time processing) led us to develop automatic procedures to extract and match the markers and to track the needle in real time. Experimental studies confirmed that our algorithms are robust and reliable. Preliminary experiments conducted on a human abdomen phantom showed that our system is highly accurate (needle positioning error within 3 mm) and enables the surgeon to reach a target in less than 1 minute on average. Our next step will be to perform an in vivo evaluation. Copyright © 2005 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
Article
Computed tomography (CT)-guided percutaneous radiofrequency ablation (RFA) has become a commonly used procedure in the treatment of liver tumors. One of the main challenges related to the method is the exact placement of the instrument within the lesion. To address this issue, a system was developed for computer-assisted needle placement which uses a set of fiducial needles to compensate for organ motion in real time. The purpose of this study was to assess the accuracy of the system in vivo. Two medical experts with experience in CT-guided interventions and two nonexperts used the navigation system to perform 32 needle insertions into contrasted agar nodules injected into the livers of two ventilated swine. Skin-to-target path planning and real-time needle guidance were based on preinterventional 1 mm CT data slices. The lesions were hit in 97% of all trials with a mean user error of 2.4±2.1 mm, a mean target registration error (TRE) of 2.1±1.1 mm, and a mean overall targeting error of 3.7±2.3 mm. The nonexperts achieved significantly better results than the experts with an overall error of 2.8±1.4 mm (n=16) compared to 4.5±2.7 mm (n=16). The mean time for performing four needle insertions based on one preinterventional planning CT was 57±19 min with a mean setup time of 27 min, which includes the steps fiducial insertion (24±15 min), planning CT acquisition (1±0 min), and registration (2±1 min). The mean time for path planning and targeting was 5±4 and 2±1 min, respectively. Apart from the fiducial insertion step, experts and nonexperts performed comparably fast. It is concluded that the system allows for accurate needle placement into hepatic tumors based on one planning CT and could thus enable considerable improvement to the clinical treatment standard for RFA procedures and other CT-guided interventions in the liver. To support clinical application of the method, optimization of individual system modules to reduce intervention time is proposed.
Conference Paper
In this study the accuracy of 3D reconstruction systems using different camera setup in horizontal or vertical direction (plane) was investigated. Since it is critical that the object being filmed has to be visible by at least two cameras one is trying to keep cameras as parallel as possible to increase a common field of view. Also a camera positioned perpendicular to the area of interest assures better resolution in the horizontal and vertical directions (X-axis and Y-axis). On the other hand the depth resolution (Z-axis) suffers when cameras optical axes do not converge enough. Theoretically and also shown in practice angle of intersection from 60° to 120° is equally reliable. The convergent vertical camera set-up (one camera positioned above the other) is expected to encompass both requirements: depth of resolution and satisfactory large common field of view
3D surface reconstruction
  • F V D Heijden
F. v. d. Heijden, "3D surface reconstruction," University of twente -RAM, p. 3, 2016.
In vivo accuracy assessment of a needle-based navigation system for CT-guided radiofrequency ablation of the liver
  • L Maier-Hein
  • A Tekbas
  • A Seitel
  • A Müller
  • F Pianka
  • S Satzl
  • S Schawo
  • B Radeleff
  • R Tetzlaff
  • A Tetzlaff
L. Maier-Hein, A. Tekbas, A. Seitel, A. Müller, F. Pianka, S. Satzl, S. Schawo, B. Radeleff, R. Tetzlaff and A. Tetzlaff, "In vivo accuracy assessment of a needle-based navigation system for CT-guided radiofrequency ablation of the liver," Medical Physics, vol. 35, p. 5385-96, 2008.