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The Vietnam War and Tourism in Bangkok's Development, 1960-70

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この論文は国立情報学研究所の学術雑誌公開支援事業により電子化されました。 This paper explores the reasons behind Bangkok's rapid growth in the 1960s, concentrating on two particular influences : the Vietnam War and its related developments, and the first significant upsurge in tourism. It is suggested that US military involvement in the Vietnam War had a significant impact on the development of Bangkok's service and construction industries. Particularly important was a major burst of construction activity in the 1960s : new suburbs developed and hotels and other commercial building sprang up. The financial, commercial and tourist industries experienced rapid growth, and construction followed in their wake. The presence of the US military in Vietnam indirectly induced an influx of foreign direct investment boosting the growth of industry in Bangkok. Tourism added to the expansion of services and construction. Among the reasons for the increase in tourism were the stable political atmosphere and the development of Bangkok as a crossroads of international air transportation. The hotel industry and retail industry both expanded rapidly due to tourist demand.
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... After World War II, American influence in Thailand increased. During the Vietnam War, Thailand's militarydominated government kept Thailand from becoming a battlefield, which Thais still identify with pride (Ouyyanont, 2001). However, regional conflict brought an influx of cultures (Chanlett, 2009;Boontinand and Petcharamesree, 2018). ...
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Thesis (Ph. D.)--Claremont Graduate School, 1974. Photocopy from microfilm of typescript.
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