Book

Interactive Dramaturgies: New Approaches in Multimedia Content and Design

Authors:

Abstract

Interactive media allow and at the same time require new forms of dramaturgy. Heide Hagebölling develops a new understanding of dramaturgy - so called "Interactive Dramaturgy" or "Expanded Dramaturgy". Beyond the traditional concept "Interactive Dramaturgies" is focussing on aesthetic, narrative, structural and communicative elements that develop in interactive situations and multimedia environments. A collection of original contributions by internationally renownend multimedia authors, designers, and artists outline design concepts and strategies. Outstanding case studies and media projects are analyzed, covering a broad range of both applications and genres: culture, art and education; museums and exhibitions; film, TV, games and entertainment; augmented reality and hybrid environments. "Interactive dramaturgies" go beyond the well established term of interactive storytelling. They carefully define and create the rules of altered roles and required competences of both authors and users in a new communicational setting. The publication provides designers, authors, artists, theoreticians, media critics and students interested in interactive media with new approaches and views in multimedia content and design. Prof. Roy Ascott, University of Plymouth; University of California, L.A.:"Indispensable to anyone wishing to understand the multi-dimensional complexities and challenges of interactive media at its cutting edge, Heide Hagebölling’s book is a brilliant collection of writings from many inspired and inspiring sources. The context of dramaturgy, in which these texts are set, fruitfully elicits propositions and reflections over a wide range of significant issues: from innovative narrative structures, interactive games, and new approaches to film, TV and theatre, to radical learning strategies, museum design and navigation, creativity in data space, and the central issues of content building." Key Topics: Interactive Dramaturgies Cultural Learning Museum&Media MediaTecture&HybridSpaces Gaming&Interaction Interactive Film&Television Web-based Literature&Stories Men-Machine Interaction Interactive Content Design Key Elements: Non linearity, orientation and navigation Space and time in interactive media Individual reception and multi-user-platform Narrative perspectives and individual views Polyformal concepts Hypermedia Augmented reality and hybrid spaces Interface design Multi- and intermedia Networks and open structures Design for intercultural communication Heide Hagebölling, media-designer and communication scientist, is Professor for Video and Interactive Media at the Academy of Media Arts Cologne, Germany, of which she is co-founder. Her professional and academic work covers aspects of art, culture, and media. She participated i

Chapters (10)

The history of interactive dramaturgies stretches far back into the past; it is the history of our narrative traditions and of their aesthetic and artistic forms. At the same time, it is a history of rites, dramatic creations, and media. Numerous elements of a dramaturgy of interactive media are components of these historical experiences: one could call them cultural fingerprints. To date, their historicity has been the subject of little analysis, since they have been largely taken-for-granted. Against this backdrop, this article looks at the point of contact at which traditional forms of dramaturgy encounter new impulses and conditions, resulting in innovative forms of expression and transformed dramaturgic codes. The most far-reaching change currently involves the networking of digital media and the concomitant changes in the production and reception of cultural and scientific contents in hypermedia structures and environments.
If by “dialogue” we mean dialogic reasoning as in “Socratic dialogue”, today’s computers are not capable of it: their interactivity is limited to strictly obeying predefined commands and answering simple queries within a single logic domain. This mode of communication is not even at the linguistic level of the stone ages. The issue here is whether computers based on closed logic are principally able to develop a genuine ability for dialogue. The author describes a new “polylogic“ approach which holds potential for innovative cognitive computing and dialogic applications in communication and the arts.
From collections management to kiosk information systems to the Web, managing all aspects of data quality, work-flow and varied publishing processes presents a challenge to museums that want to share their rich visual documentation with a general audience. Open-architected applications and a good understanding of audience go a long way toward meeting this challenge and at the Getty have helped create the critical infrastructure that supports the delivery of non-linear, interactive narratives for a general audience. The Getty Museum’s ArtAccess, created in 1996–1997, is one response to this challenge. The back-office work of authoring and content creation is anchored in standards-based data shared by many museum applications. The front-end presentation through the user interface transforms the experience of reading data into an experience that seamlessly integrates high quality audio and video with the usual images and text in manner that responds to our audiences’ needs to receive and create engaging stories based in the museum collections.
Can the time-tested visions of developing nations and ancient living cultures shape the form of future information technology?
This paper seeks to understand, classify, and give historical context to the dramaturgy of different kinds of computer games according to the differing interactive possibilities they provide. This results in three basic types of games: action games, adventure games, and strategy games. This conclusion is reached and accounted for on the basis of the science of labor (time-and-motion studies), theatrical and narrative theory, and cybernetics. Time is critical in the interaction in the present in action games: they require attentiveness in the production of a temporally optimized series of choices taken from a repertoire of norm-governed actions. Decisions are critical in the navigation of that which is at hand in adventure games: they require optimal judgments in the traversing of the decision-making nodes of a flowchart. Configuration is critical in the organization of the possible in strategy games: they require patience in the optimal regulation of interdependent values.
Computer games were long scoffed at. The rigid black-and-white thinking of the developer in whose games the buyer was the hero and the abstract figures were the bad guys inhibited the narration of complex stories. It was only after explosive technological breakthroughs that programmers and graphic artists succeeded in creating lifelike virtual worlds. Nonetheless, most games continued to stay with rigidly predetermined roles. One person, however, always saw things a little differently. Peter Molyneux, a developer from England, devoted his efforts to transposing the player into the role of a god. Is a god good or evil? “It depends how his followers judge him,” Peter Molyneux believes. For almost four years he worked on Black&White with the aim of granting the player all possible freedom, while at the same time leading him through a story full of variety.
It is regrettable that the “rural” community structures inherent in early BBSs (Bulletin Board Systems such as the WELL) are not more centrally retained in out current “urban” Internet system. Nevertheless, there is enormous energy in this global city. Like the energy which spawned an era of action painting in populous and diverse New York City, the intensity of the new Internet is a fertile breeding ground for writers and readers of information intensive electronic literature.
“Paul is Dead” is an on-line rock and roll murder mystery told in episodic form, with daily releases of material, and weekly closure expressed as cliffhangers. It went live on the Internet in July of 1997 and lasted for exactly one year. The project is a landmark in the world of online games, and interactive entertainment. “Paul is Dead” is currently being developed as a television series.
Multi-media mise-en-scène and narrative explorations from graphic novels to web-screens: this paper proposes to explore some works at the boundaries of specific narrative genres such as graphic novels, comics, illustrated books as well as different media from paper books to Internet websites. By sharing some explorations in interactive visual narratives, more specifically based on graphic novels, also known as “bande dessinée” or “BD” in French, the author is suggesting that the visual grammar of BD (graphic novels) is interesting in further constructing the emerging languages in computer mediated narratives and communications.
Interactive media begin with the circular page — the content steering wheel that enables the user to select and initiate an information or story dialogue based upon his or her own interests. The circular page metaphor takes us from the linear, layered logic of hierarchies and sequence to the fluid simplicity of turning the wheel and traveling through content in the direction we desire.
... From other side, Multimedia supported by new and novel science fields, such as ubiquitous and pervasive computing, may provide strong technological support for museums by considering their strong impact on the main museum functions. This research scope will be limited to the interpretation and exhibition functions of museums [ 38], with a little insight on other functions. ...
... Page | 4 is a non-profit making, permanent institution in the service of society and of its development, and open to the public, which acquires, conserves, researches, communicates and exhibits, for purposes of study, education and enjoyment, material evidence of people and their environment." [ 45] According to the Canadian Museums Association, museums are defined as The museum main functions as the hand's figures according to [ 38] According to Joseph Veach Noble, the purpose of the museum is "to collect, to conserve, to study, to interpret and to exhibit." [ 38, pp.75] Apparently, these five pillars or what he referred to as the hand's fingers are forming a unit to achieve a common purpose, but at the same time, each one of them is independent. ...
... Under the first three fingers relies the definition of the classical past and the very early museums. The classical example of this definition shall be the earliest known museum, the "mousseion" of Alexandria three centuries before Christ as mentioned in [ 38], where the idea of collection was the dominating model of museums. Actually, that museum was rather a library than a museum in our current understanding. ...
Thesis
Full-text available
The ubiquitous computing field is evolving rapidly. Its applications are penetrating everyday situations. Furthermore, the increasing demand on personalisation and customisation is calling for new means of providing content and services to the users based on the user’s own specific context. Museums and exhibitions, which form an integral part of the cultural heritage of society, are seeing increasing demands for contextualised exhibition services at every stage of the museum experience i.e. before, during and after a museum visit. Contextualisation aims to elicit a more engaging experience in order to enrich visitors’ learning and enjoyment. Moreover, technological support for exploration, explanation, and communication are needed to support museums’ essential functions, particularly, interpretation and exhibition. In this research thesis, a novel infrastructure, called Medient Infrastructure is designed, implemented and evaluated. The main results, usage showcases and a demo scenario for the Holstentor museum in Lübeck, called "Holstentour”, will be demonstrated to outline the infrastructure’s design, which is realised based on Web Services, Service Oriented Architecture and an Event-driven approach. The design considers easy and flexible deployment in complex exhibition scenarios. Moreover, one of the main design goals is minimizing the required infrastructure and installation procedures, hence, visitors can use their personal mobile devices easily and effectively. Furthermore, museums are free to design their own mobile and stationary context-aware applications. Basic, advanced and environmental context information is gathered to support a ubiquitous museum information environment to support multimedia content delivery on Bluetooth-enabled and AJAX supported mobile devices, whereby Ubiquitous Learning can be supported in museum environments. Finally, the system’s approach is focusing on museums for the first pilot prototype. For future work, other environments such as the university campus, hospitals, etc will be tested against the proposed approach.
... Simply put, only if first a question is raised and then answered can suspense be evoked. Second, narrative structure has been a central theme for designers and architects ( Hagebölling 2004 ;Psarra 2005 ;Greenberg 2005 Rabkin (1973 ) identifies as one of four levels of narration being important for narrative suspense, only marginally and focuses instead on the other three levels: plot, character and theme. Nevertheless, the exhibition analyses show the importance of scenography for creating suspense in exhibitions. ...
... Schreibman, Siemens & Unsworth (2008),Bartscherer & Coover (2011) e Gardiner & Musto (2015.18 VerHabebölling (2004). ...
Article
Full-text available
This paper presents a discussion and research results related to the development of an online database for musical theater productions . The increase of musical theatre productions creates the need to propose ways to archive materials from various media. The database assembled for the musical David, created at the Dramaturgy Laboratory of the University of Brasilia in 2012, was studied as a methodological example.
... Zusammenfassend lässt sich sagen, dass damit ein intra-und interdisziplinärer Forschungskontext angesprochen worden ist, bei dem es um die narrative Adressierung von Online-Kunden (Zielgruppendifferenzierung) durch Interactive Storytelling (Hagebölling, 2004) (Hanna et al., 2011;Pitta, Fowler, 2005). An dieser Stelle liegt die Verbindung mit der Empirischen Sozialforschung und der Zielgruppen-und Kundenanalyse in den Prozessschritten (7), (8) (Costa, McCrae, 1992, Caliendo et al., 2011, der zweite auf dem Entrepreneurial Potential Questionnaire (King, 1985). ...
Research
Full-text available
Der Ansatz eines Storied Business im Wertschöpfungsprozess von Unternehmen zielt auf die Bedeutung Neuer Medien für die Erschließung neuer und zusätzlicher Produkt-, Service- und Kundenmärkte ab. Besonders für ‚Kleine und Mittlere Unternehmen’ (KMU) ist es wichtig, ihre Kunden über solche Medien anzusprechen, die auf der Basis des Internets keine Reich-weitenrestriktion haben, damit Produkt- oder Service-Innovationen gezielt und weltweit an ausgewählte Kunden adressiert werden können. Da sich die Kunden selbst hinsichtlich ihrer Interessen und ihres Verhaltens zu New Customers wandeln, indem sie ihre bisherige Rolle als typische Kaufkunden zu interaktiven Kunden entwickelt haben, hat sich ihr Informations-bedarf von der angebotenen Unternehmensleistung auf das Unternehmen selbst erweitert. Um solche interaktiven Ansprüche von Kunden proaktiv und entrepreneurisch zu nutzen, schafft das Format eines Storied Business eine Gelegenheit, Botschaften zu kommunizieren, die dem Bedürfnis von Kunden entgegenkommen, die sich neben Produkten und Dienstleistungen zunehmend auch für die Geschäftsmodelle von Unternehmen interessieren und als Customer Investors ein weiteres Rollenprofil einnehmen. Die Interessen dieser New Customers reichen von der Beteiligung an Produkt- oder Prozessoptimierungen bis hin zu unternehmerischen Investitionsformen. Indem sich aber Kunden an der Wertsteigerung von Unternehmen beteili-gen, wächst die Anforderung an die Unternehmen, den damit einhergehenden Kommunikati-onsanspruch unter dem Gesichtspunkt erfolgreicher Wertschöpfung strategisch zu bewältigen. Wie dieses aus der Sicht von KMU gestaltet werden kann, wird mit dem Prozess einer Inter-active Acceleration zum Innovieren von Geschäftsmodellen und Unternehmensstrategien be-schrieben, woraus sich strategisch steuerbare Geschäftsmodellinnovationen ableiten lassen.
... Instructional design may be seen as a way to set the stage for these actors' in terplay. Storyboarding is a conventional approach to anticipate what shall happen on the stage (Rabenalt 2004) and it has been taken and adapted to technology enhanced learning (Hagebölling 2004). Storyboarding is already used in other social engineering disciplines like enterprise con flict solution (Forsha 1994). ...
Chapter
The use of learning objects is an emerging concept proven to be valuable in the areas of knowl-edge management and e-learning. Learning objects are a key technology building a bridge be-tween these two converging fields (Ras et al. 2005). In spite of their importance, the design of learning objects, conceptually and technically, is often debated with little effort to fully describe the learning or educational process. A lot of effort has been put in the definition of standards by numerous institutions. However, "key issues related to global content classification such as a common schema, ontology, granularity, taxonomy, and semantics of learning objects which are critical to the design and implementation of learning objects remain unsolved" (Mohan, Daniel 2004). Instructional design deals with setting up spaces in which human learners can be directly taught and can guide their own learning experiences. It prepares learning paths such that learners with different prerequisites, with different needs and desires, in varying moods and under widely un-foreseeable circumstances can find their way. Learning objects are building blocks for learning spaces; they are constituents of individual learning paths. The field of instructional design and development provides insights into the design of learning objects by enabling learning object de-signers to use existing terminology, models, and methods from instructional design. Learning object oriented instructional design is a challenge that has to deal with several issues such as syntax and semantics, granularity, and reusability. The concept of dynamic annotation is a step towards a resolution of the retrieval and reuse dilemma. Dynamic annotation enables the annotation of individual objects in such a way that these annotations describe sufficiently well the meaning of a learning object. The granularity of learning objects has a crucial impact on the ability to adapt, aggregate, and arrange content suiting the needs and preferences of the learner. When deciding on which granularity to choose, the trade-off between the possible benefits of reuse and the expense of cataloging is of crucial importance (Wiley 2000). The multidimensional learning object architecture is a generic approach enabling adaptivity and supporting instructional design. This architecture is based on different dimensions of adaptivity. Smallest building blocks that are "semantically not dividable" and "uniquely classifiable" are the central element of the presented architecture. They can be combined to other types of learning objects and allow an instructor or a system to choose the variant that suits best the user’s goals, needs, and preferences. Many learning objects can be considered as components, and in some cases as software compo-nents. Hence, approaches from the field of Software Engineering have an impact on instructional design. Technologies such as design patterns, frameworks, and product lines are integrated within a component-based approach for instructional design. Design patterns are a good means for making design ideas more explicit and hence applicable, developing learning objects for re-use by following the component paradigm will increase their reusability, and the separation of concerns by applying frameworks and product lines will decrease the complexity of instructional design and its embodiment (i.e., reusing concrete learning objects).
... Instructional design may be seen as a way to set the stage for these actors' interplay. Storyboarding is a conventional approach to anticipate what shall happen on the stage (Rabenalt 2004) and it has been taken and adapted to technology enhanced learning (Hagebölling 2004). Storyboarding is already used in other social engineering disciplines like enterprise conflict solution (Forsha 1994). ...
Chapter
Full-text available
Project Kirini is an autonomous interactive indoor exhibit, which utilizes the technologies of projection mapping and physical computing to highlight the cultural heritage of beekeeping in the island region of Cyclades in Greece. The team members researched and collected material on the tradition and the techniques of beekeeping from the ancient times until today through bibliographies and physical interviews. After the completion of the research and organization of the information, the team designed four different types of interactive scenarios. Through a set of formative evaluations, several issues comments and ideas emerged and iteratively implemented to enhance the prototype. Having gathered the results and the conclusions from the evaluations an interactive exhibit was produced and installed in public space.
Chapter
Full-text available
For a television show that has often seemed to delight in shocking viewers since its very first episode in 2011, which, in case we needed reminding, featured the Prime Minister of Great Britain having carnal relations with a sus scrofa domesticus, Black Mirror saved one of its greatest surprises for 28 December 2018 with the release of the 20th instalment in the series, Bandersnatch, directed by David Slade. While two of its previous episodes had centred on video games: the highly regarded dystopian vision of gamification en masse, “Fifteen Million Merits”, and the horror-inflected augmented reality tale of “Playtest”, in an unexpected turn of events for both Netflix and the creator of Black Mirror, Charlie Brooker, Bandersnatch was not just about video games, it was one. This chapter explores the significance of Bandersnatch as an intriguing combination of video game and film, an example of what many referred to as an “interactive movie” or what Nitzan Ben Shaul called “hyper-narrative interactive cinema” in his Hyper-narrative Interactive Cinema: Problems and Solutions (2008). The authors interrogate how far Bandersnatch emerges as a text immersed in some of the defining thematic elements of what we might call “the Black Mirror experience” but also uses the interactive nature of the project in original and compelling ways connected to the protagonist’s experience of trauma which the audience or “interactors” are forced to share.
Chapter
Ich danke allen, die an der Entstehung dieses Buches unterstützend mitwirkten, indem sie Bild- und Informationsmaterial zur Verfügung stellten, und all jenen, die mich motivierend und geduldig begleiteten.
Conference Paper
Full-text available
This paper presents a method for the merging of poetry into interactive storytelling that is based on still and video panoramas. This non-linear approach aims to give a young audience a new understanding of poetry, by exploring the poet Charles Causley's house and the town of Launceston in England where he spent most of his life. His poetry mentions a number of locations from this town and artefacts located in his house. The user of the interactive application based on Adobe Flash plug-in and Lucid Viewer (panoramic viewer), take a number of narrative journeys in order to search for hidden poems, voice marks or trails signs that have references to the town. Still panoramas localised at decision-making points were linked by using video panoramas (360-degree video), which were recorded with a spherical video camera - Ladybug2 mounted on a motorised wheelchair. Still and video panoramas are elements that create a branching narrative. The aim of this application is to develop the interest not only in the Causley's biography but also in literary output of the poet.
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The idea of interactional trajectories through interfaces has emerged as a sensitizing concept from recent studies of tangible interfaces and interaction in museums and galleries. We put this concept to work as a lens to reflect on published studies of complex user experiences that extend over space and time and involve multiple roles and interfaces. We develop a conceptual framework in which trajectories explain these user experiences as journeys through hybrid structures, punctuated by transitions, and in which interactivity and collaboration are orchestrated. Our framework is intended to sensitize future studies, help distill craft knowledge into design guidelines and patterns, identify technology requirements, and provide a boundary object to connect HCI with Performance Studies.
Article
Full-text available
Los Sims Historias de la vida y Los Sims 2 Náufragos representan un cambio en la estrategia de la saga Los Sims. Hasta ahora el juego se basaba en la simulación donde el jugador podía elegir construir sus personajes y crear una historia con objetivos libremente elegidos. Los diseñadores han elegido un modelo de juego distinto y opuesto al habitual: el juego lineal por niveles del género de acción. ¿Es posible combinar la linealidad propia de un juego de acción, que se aproxima a la adaptación cinematográfica, dentro de la libertad de opciones propia de Los Sims? ¿Dónde está la narrativa de Los Sims? Responder a estas preguntas es el propósito del presente trabajo.
ResearchGate has not been able to resolve any references for this publication.