Book

A Psychology of User Experience: Involvement, Affect and Aesthetics

Authors:

Abstract

It is well-established that while cognitive psychology provides a sound foundation for an understanding of our interactions with digital technology, this is no longer sufficient to make sense of how we use and experience the personal, relational and ubiquitous technologies that pervade everyday life. This book begins with a consideration of the nature of experience itself, and the user experience (UX) of digital technology in particular, offering a new, broader definition of the term. This is elaborated though a wide-ranging and rigorous review of what are argued to be the three core UX elements. These are involvement, including shared sense making, familiarity, appropriation and “being-with” technologies; affect, including emotions with and about technology, impressions, feelings and mood; and aesthetics, including embodied aesthetics and neuroaesthetics. Alongside this, new insights are introduced into how and why much of our current use of digital technology is simply idling, or killing time. A particular feature of the book is a thorough treatment of parallel, and sometimes competing, accounts from differing academic traditions. Overall, the discussion considers both foundational and more recent theoretical and applied perspectives from social psychology, evolutionary psychology, folk psychology, neuroaesthetics, neuropsychology, the philosophy of technology, design and the fine arts. This broad scope will be enlightening and stimulating for anyone concerned in understanding UX. A Psychology of User Experience stands as a companion text to the author’s HCI Redux text which discusses the contemporary treatment of cognition in human-computer interaction.

Chapters (6)

Interest in user experience (UX) became apparent in the mid-1990s when its advocates proposed that the design and evaluation of digital technology should be extended beyond the purely instrumental to include the broader range of experiences which it offers.
This chapter discusses our involvement with digital products. Donald Norman tells us that he coined the term “user experience” (UX) to refer to “all aspects of the end-user’s interaction with the company, its services, and its products” (NNG website, nd).
This chapter extends the theme of involvement with technology which we introduced in Chaps. 1 and 2 and discusses some of the consequences of living “up close and personal” with technology.
This chapter discusses our affective relationships with digital technology. These are regarded by some to be most important aspect of any experience and have been described as, “the most central and pervasive aspects of human experience” (Ortony et al. 1988, p. 3). Despite this, affect barely receives any attention in the definitions of UX.
This chapter is concerned with our aesthetic experience of digital products. This is the third component of our account of user experience but unlike the other two elements (involvement and affect), there is no readily available psychology of aesthetics to draw upon.
This book has presented a psychology of user experience and in doing so we have adopted a philosophical perspective to frame at least some of the ways in which we interact or use or otherwise employ digital products.
... In particular, the virtual reality glasses bring new sensations and a feeling of immersion and conviviality. This experience is closed to a concept that emerged with digital tools that is user experience (Turner, 2017). ...
... Besides, the combination of drones and virtual reality devices (i.e., immersive technology)two technologies that we classified as assisting technologiesseems to produce surprising results. Further research is needed to understand if this new work experience that can be labelled as a user experience (Turner, 2017) is observed solely with immersive technologies. Immersive technologies are designed to maximize pleasure and enjoyment which are usually identified as user experience's components. ...
... Immersive technologies are designed to maximize pleasure and enjoyment which are usually identified as user experience's components. However, Turner (2017) advocates that user experience encompasses a larger range of experience (e.g., involvement, sense-making processes) and emphasizes the necessity for psychological scholars to extend our knowledge on the human-technology interactions. ...
Article
Full-text available
New technologies with unprecedented agentic capabilities (i.e., action selection, protocol development) are now introduced in organizations such as Big Data, 3D printing or artificial intelligence. Because they are endowed with novel capabilities that might compete with human agency, they might disrupt the way employees work. Based on the work design model, this study aims to examine their introduction in the daily work activities and the consequent perceptions of the work characteristics. Building on Murray’s et al. (2020) proposal, we offer a classification of the digital technologies to conceptualize their relationship with the work characteristics. To explore the changes induced by two digital technologies (i.e., drones, robotic automation process), we interviewed 3 types of employees (i.e., experts, managers, users) from an organization which has started a digitalization process and we conducted a thematic analysis. Our analysis revealed three main themes that are discussed: A technological theme (arresting, assisting), a work characteristic theme and a theme about the human-technology relationship (agentic, non-agentic). Results showed that employee autonomy has not been reduced when digital technologies executed repetitive and unmotivated tasks and that jobs in the digital work context may be marked by a high level of knowledge characteristics. Moreover, technologies with agentic capabilities may be perceived as a non-human agent. Theoretical contributions for the work design model are then examined.
... At an unconscious level, the literature reviewed above suggests that the use of voice-based intelligence technology can have a socially fulfilling effect on the human mind. SVAS can understand and speak the natural language (Turner 2017). It is a "relational artifact" that is designed to engage users in a relationship (Turkle 2007;Turner 2017). ...
... SVAS can understand and speak the natural language (Turner 2017). It is a "relational artifact" that is designed to engage users in a relationship (Turkle 2007;Turner 2017). ...
... There are many cases that testify human tendency to anthropomorphize non-human objects, built parasocial relationship, and feel psychological condolences (Epley et al. 2007;Siegel et al. 1999;Turner 2017). For instance, the owners of Roomba (an autonomous robotic vacuum cleaner) tend to treat it as a family member, dress it up, give a name and gender, and feel that the machine has intentions and feeling (Sung et al. 2007). ...
Article
Full-text available
Unlike most other computing devices that are known to isolate their users, Smart Voice Assistant Speaker (SVAS) appears to improve the perception of social cohesion (i.e., Group Harmony) among its co-users. We hypothesize that the social cues emanated from the continued, and habituated, use of SVAS develop the “illusion of intimacy” which, in turn, ripples through the entire group, and help fulfill the need for social integration. The data collected from 218 families support this hypothesis. We argue that just as a puppy dog contributes to a happy family, so does the SVAS contributes to the social dynamics by making the users unconsciously fulfill their psychological needs and by increasing actual conversations among its users. Incidentally, the study compared the relative influence of three factors (the beta weight of “Hedonic Motivation” being the highest, followed by “Compatibility,” and then “Perceived Security”) that, as a whole, explain over 60% of the variance in Satisfaction of post-adoption SVAS use.
... It is worth noting that the Mori's claim has far-reaching consequences for the development of androids (Mori, 1970(Mori, , 2005. Especially, this is due to the "Uncanny Valley" phenomenon, which attracts a considerable attention in the recent literature (Turner, 2017). According to the "Uncanny Valley" hypothesis (Mori, MacDorman, & Kageki, 2012), there is a sudden drop of people's acceptance towards the robots, because even though their acceptance for the human-looking robot grows, then it falls down sharply resulting in judging the robot as unfamiliar, eerie or uncanny; then the growing acceptance towards the robot comes back as greater human-likeness of the robot appears (Fig. 1). ...
... This, in turn, indicates that familiarity of the robot may also result from educational background of the end-user more likely affecting its social perception (Fig. 1B). Moreover, it appears that positive emotional responses towards the robot becomes suddenly repulsion as indicated by the Mori diagram (1970Mori diagram ( , 2005 and confirmed by empirical reports studying user's acceptance of the social robot (Turner, 2017). Indeed, research in social psychology provides a clear answer for such switches in people's behaviors and opinions by showing that negative responses are strongly determined by attitudes that are relatively stable beliefs about whether something is good or bad (Bohner & Wänke, 2002). ...
Article
Introduction.-Recent research on human-robot interactions (HRI) emphasizes a role of user's attitudes in perceiving robot's with different robot embodiments of varying levels of human likenesses. However, other human factors such as educational background may also help understanding of what conditions contribute to enhance social perception of robot's features. Objectives.-This study aimed to determine how people's attitudes towards and familiarization with robots influence social perception of particular features of robots. Method.-First, we measured attitudes towards robots among undergraduate students with diverse educational background (engineering vs. psychology). Then, participants were presented with short movies showing the behaviour of three robots with different levels of sociability. Finally, participants evaluated the characteristics of these robots on a scale. Results.-People more familiar with social robots and with more positive attitudes towards them evaluate robots with human traits more highly. Conclusion.-Human perception of social robots resembles social phenomena related to human perception of other people. Mots clés : Interactions homme-robot Perception sociale Attitudes Robots sociaux r é s u m é Introduction.-Des recherches récentes sur les interactions homme-robot (IHR) mettent en évidence le rôle de l'attitude des usagers envers la perception de robots lorsque ceux-ci incarnent différents niveaux de traits de la personnalité humaine. Cependant, d'autres facteurs, tels que l'éducation et le niveau de formation des personnes, peuvent également aider à mieux comprendre quelles conditions contribuent à améliorer la perception de leurs attributs. Objectifs.-Cette étude était destinée à déterminer comment l'attitude et la familiarisation des gens vis-à-vis de ces robots influence la perception sociale de leurs attributs. Méthode.-Dans un premier temps, nous avons comparé l'attitude à l'égard des robots d'étudiants issus de formations différentes (de l'ingénierie à la psychologie). Ensuite, les participants ont visionné de courtes vidéos qui montraient le comportement de trois robots aux niveaux de sociabilité différents. Enfin, chaque participant a évalué et reporté les caractéristiques des robots sur une échelle. Résultats.-Les personnes les plus familières et dont l'attitude est la plus positive envers les robots sociaux ont évalué ceux-ci comme possédant des traits humains plus prononcés. Conclusion.-La perception par les humains des robots sociaux suit des comportements sociaux semblables à ceux que les hommes conduisent entre eux.
... It is worth noting that the Mori's claim has far-reaching consequences for the development of androids (Mori, 1970(Mori, , 2005. Especially, this is due to the "Uncanny Valley" phenomenon, which attracts a considerable attention in the recent literature (Turner, 2017). According to the "Uncanny Valley" hypothesis (Mori, MacDorman, & Kageki, 2012), there is a sudden drop of people's acceptance towards the robots, because even though their acceptance for the human-looking robot grows, then it falls down sharply resulting in judging the robot as unfamiliar, eerie or uncanny; then the growing acceptance towards the robot comes back as greater human-likeness of the robot appears (Fig. 1). ...
... This, in turn, indicates that familiarity of the robot may also result from educational background of the end-user more likely affecting its social perception (Fig. 1B). Moreover, it appears that positive emotional responses towards the robot becomes suddenly repulsion as indicated by the Mori diagram (1970Mori diagram ( , 2005 and confirmed by empirical reports studying user's acceptance of the social robot (Turner, 2017). Indeed, research in social psychology provides a clear answer for such switches in people's behaviors and opinions by showing that negative responses are strongly determined by attitudes that are relatively stable beliefs about whether something is good or bad (Bohner & Wänke, 2002). ...
Article
Full-text available
Introduction Recent research on human–robot interactions (HRI) emphasizes a role of user's attitudes in perceiving robot's with different robot embodiments of varying levels of human likenesses. However, other human factors such as educational background may also help understanding of what conditions contribute to enhance social perception of robot's features. Objectives This study aimed to determine how people's attitudes towards and familiarization with robots influence social perception of particular features of robots. Method First, we measured attitudes towards robots among undergraduate students with diverse educational background (engineering vs. psychology). Then, participants were presented with short movies showing the behaviour of three robots with different levels of sociability. Finally, participants evaluated the characteristics of these robots on a scale. Results People more familiar with social robots and with more positive attitudes towards them evaluate robots with human traits more highly. Conclusion Human perception of social robots resembles social phenomena related to human perception of other people.
... [29][30][31] For instance, researchers examined the phenomenon of consumption as an all-inclusive phenomenon that entails a consumer who intermingles with the company, brands, products, or other offerings throughout his/her interactive journey. 32,33 In recent years, there has been an increasing amount of literature on the phenomenon of experience in varied contexts such as human resources, 34 education, 35 psychology, 36 information systems, 37 technology, 38 and media content. 39,40 Although extensive research has been carried out on experience construct, no single study has investigated the role of experience in the context of health care and affiliated behaviors. ...
Article
Full-text available
The novel corona virus pandemic has influenced people buying behaviors. Due to the significant psychological and behavioral impact of COVID-19 on society, this study aimed to examine the determinants of panic buying behavior and a resultant psychological outcome in the form of a sense of security. The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of COVID-19 caller ringback tone (CRT) experiences, that is, informational and stimulation experience, on the panic buying behavior and how rumors moderate this relationship. This research is quantitative and uses a purposive sampling method to collect the survey-based data from 264 respondents. The researchers analyzed the data using Partial Least Square Structural Equation Modeling (PLS-SEM). The results of data analysis indicated that the informational and stimulation experience of COVID-19 CRT had a significant influence on panic buying behavior which further resulted in a sense of security in public. This study could not find evidence of the moderating role of rumors in the relationship between COVID-19 CRT experiences and panic buying behavior. The findings highlight the role of the COVID-19 CRT in causing panic buying behavior and resultant psychological outcome and thus provide implications for policymakers on the control of panic buying under COVID-19.
... Affect refers to psychological states including emotions, feelings, impressions and moods. Emotion emerges as a result of interacting with a product or system (Turner, 2017). Bargas-Avila and Hornbaek (Bargas-Avila and Hornbaek, 2011) stated that affect and emotion are treated mostly synonyms in UX research as an explanation for placing them in the same dimension. ...
Article
Full-text available
Although various methods have been developed to evaluate conversational interfaces, there has been a lack of methods specifically focusing on evaluating user experience. This paper reviews the understandings of user experience (UX) in conversational interfaces literature and examines the six questionnaires commonly used for evaluating conversational systems in order to assess the potential suitability of these questionnaires to measure different UX dimensions in that context. The method to examine the questionnaires involved developing an assessment framework for main UX dimensions with relevant attributes and coding the items in the questionnaires according to the framework. The results show that (i) the understandings of UX notably differed in literature; (ii) four questionnaires included assessment items, in varying extents, to measure hedonic, aesthetic and pragmatic dimensions of UX; (iii) while the dimension of affect was covered by two questionnaires, playfulness, motivation, and frustration dimensions were covered by one questionnaire only. The largest coverage of UX dimensions has been provided by the Subjective Assessment of Speech System Interfaces (SASSI). We recommend using multiple questionnaires to obtain a more complete measurement of user experience or improve the assessment of a particular UX dimension. RESEARCH HIGHLIGHTS Varying understandings of UX in conversational interfaces literature. A UX assessment framework with UX dimensions and their relevant attributes. Descriptions of the six main questionnaires for evaluating conversational interfaces. A comparison of the six questionnaires based on their coverage of UX dimensions.
... In particular, the driver has to understand the system so that he can intervene at any time, which is also currently required for level 2 automation [1], [2]. An appropriate human-machine interface (HMI), which focuses on the needs of the driver, is essential here [3], [4], [5]. The person who hands over control to a machine wants to feel well informed about the status of the system, which plays a major role in his or her wellbeing and for the user experience (UX) [6]. ...
Chapter
Full-text available
Advanced driver assistance systems (ADAS) support the driver in certain traffic situations and can increase road safety. For this appropriate interaction, concepts between the driver and the assistance systems are required, which focuses on driver’s needs. In a user-centered study with N = 48 subjects, interviews and questionnaires were conducted during a test drive in real road traffic in order to test and evaluate the lane keeping assistant system (LKAS) with head-up display (HUD). In addition, two current premium vehicles from various manufacturers were used to investigate the influence of the HUD on the user experience and to derive optimization potential for current and future automatic driving functions. In comparison to the test rides with LKAS in combination without HUD (with head-down display), it can be determined that there is a positive influence of HUD on the experience with LKAS.
... In this study, the focus is placed on seven shopping malls in Durban City. Durban City provides consumers with the exciting experience of shopping with diverse products ranging from domestic appliances, foodstuffs, and other variety of services (Turner, 2017). Given the diverse implications attributed to gender differences, it is inexcusable to disregard the significance of shopping malls in retail research. ...
Article
Full-text available
The development of shopping malls is a major social and global phenomenon that has unearthed a novel facet for customer satisfaction and their consequent or relative buying behavior. The aim of his paper was to explore the gender differences in consumer buying behavior at selected Durban shopping malls. It is an observational cross-sectional study carried out on 700 randomly selected respondents to study buying capacity, buying behavior and shopping experience of male and female consumers at shopping malls in the city of Durban, South Africa. Data was collected through pre-tested semi-structured questionnaire with closed ended questions. The study revealed that there are notable gender differences, which shape shopping behavior among men and women. Time and money spent at the mall was significantly high among female as compared to male consumers. Consequently, the results attributed that personal attributes and shopping mall attractiveness factors played a crucial role in influencing customer shopping behavior amongst the mall shoppers. The study concludes that gender differences are prevalent in the buying behavior of customers at the select shopping malls in Durban, South Africa. Average time spent by female is high as compared to male which also affect their average money spent at shopping mall. Psychological, Social and Cultural factors are highly influencing customers’ buying behavior at shopping malls.
... The function of the static avatar in our numeracy games was decorative, making the game look aesthetically pleasing and thus more motivating to play with. The avatar could also have the role of eliciting positive gameplay experience, given that the aesthetic quality is identified as a critical factor for user experience (Turner, 2017). In general, a happy learner can be a more effective problem-solver (Isen et al., 1987). ...
Article
Full-text available
Digital Education Games (DEGs) have been used to support children's learning in various domains. A number of existing studies on DEGs has focused on whether they could improve children's learning performance. However, only a few of them have attempted to address the critical question of how young children interact with DEGs. Bridging this gap was the main motivation underpinning this research study. With the use of eye-tracking technology, we explored our research goal by evaluating a bespoke DEG on numeracy and its cardboard version that we developed based on the UK Early Years Foundation Stage (EYFS) framework. A between-subject experiment study involving 94 five-year-olds was conducted. The research protocols and instruments were pilot tested and ethically approved. In analysing the eye-tracking data, we refined the Gaze Sub-sequence Marking Scheme to infer children's interaction strategies. Results showed that the difference in the learning effect between the digital and cardboard game was insignificant, that the children's interaction strategies varied significantly with their achievement level, and that children's gender was not a significant factor in determining the impact of learning with the DEG. Implications for rendering eye-tracking technology more child-friendly and designing DEGs for young children are drawn.
... Last but not least, Document Towers visualizations have a certain aesthetic appeal, which is a useful user experience factor [28]. ...
Article
Full-text available
This article introduces the generic Document Towers paradigm, visualization, and software for visualizing the structure of paginated documents, based on the metaphor of documents-as-architecture. The Document Towers visualizations resemble three-dimensional building models and represent the physical boundaries of logical (e.g., titles, images), semantic (e.g., topics, named entities), graphical (e.g., typefaces, colors), and other types of information with spatial extent as a stack of rooms and floors. The software takes as input user-supplied JSON-formatted coordinates and labels of document entities, or extracts them itself from ALTO and InDesign IDML files. The Document Towers paradigm and visualization enable information systems to support information behaviors other than goal-oriented searches. Visualization encourages exploration by generating panoramic overviews and fostering serendipitous insights, while the use of metaphors assists with comprehension of the representations through the application of a familiar cognitive model. Document Towers visualizations also provide access to types of information other than textual content, specifically by means of their physical structure, which corresponds to the material, logical, semantic, and contextual aspects of documents. Visualization renders documents transparent, making the invisible visible and facilitating analysis at a glance and without the need for physical manipulation. Keyword searches and other language-based interactions with documents must be clearly expressed and will return only answers to questions asked; by contrast, visual observation is well suited to fuzzy goals and uncovering unexpected aspects of the data.
... Last but not least, Document Towers visualizations have a certain aesthetic appeal, which is a useful user experience factor [28]. ...
Preprint
Full-text available
This article introduces the generic Document Towers paradigm, visualization, and software for visualizing the structure of paginated documents, based on the metaphor of documents-as-architecture. The Document Towers visualizations resemble three-dimensional building models and represent the physical boundaries of logical (e.g., titles, images), semantic (e.g., topics, named entities), graphical (e.g., typefaces, colors), and other types of information with spatial extent as a stack of rooms and floors. The software takes as input user-supplied JSON-formatted coordinates and labels of document entities, or extracts them itself from ALTO and InDesign IDML files. The Document Towers paradigm and visualization enable information systems to support information behaviors other than goal-oriented searches. Visualization encourages exploration by generating panoramic overviews and fostering serendipitous insights, while the use of metaphors assists with comprehension of the representations through the application of a familiar cognitive model. Document Towers visualizations also provide access to types of information other than textual content, specifically by means of their physical structure, which corresponds to the material, logical, semantic, and contextual aspects of documents. Visualization renders documents transparent, making the invisible visible and facilitating analysis at a glance and without the need for physical manipulation. Keyword searches and other language-based interactions with documents must be clearly expressed and will return only answers to questions asked; by contrast, visual observation is well suited to fuzzy goals and uncovering unexpected aspects of the data.
... Kesuksesan memasarkan produk, layanan, atau sistem di dunia internasional membutuhkan pengetahuan yang baik tentang calon konsumenny, sehingga berpengaruh dalam menentukan daerah pemasaran dan fitur-fitur yang cocok untuk calon konsumen wilayah tersebut [2]. Dalam pengembangan jenis-jenis smartphone, desain menjadi salah satu variabel yang turut dipertimbangkan untuk bisa menghadirkan user experience yang proporsional. ...
Article
There are many factors that cause someone to tend to like and choose a smartphone brand to use. The selection of certain smartphone brands is related to consumer loyalty, one of which is influenced by the user experience quality factor of the smartphone that has been used and is an important consideration for switching or making choices on smartphone products from the same brand. To get a high user experience, a positive attitude on smartphones is needed. This study aims to examine the effect of attitudes on smartphones on user experience in the use of the gadget. The sampling technique used was random sampling, and the samples of this study are men and women who actively use smartphones. Data analysis in this study used path analysis. The results of the analysis concluded that the model fit with P=0.209 and GFI = 0.967.
Book
Full-text available
Love and Electronic Affection: A Design Primer brings together thought leadership in romance and affection games to explain the past, present, and possible future of affection play in games. The authors apply a combination of game analysis and design experience in affection play for both digital and analog games. The research and recommendations are intersectional in nature, considering how love and affection in games is a product of both player and designer age, race, class, gender, and more. The book combines game studies with game design to offer a foundation for incorporating affection into playable experiences. The text is organized into two sections. The first section covers the patterns and practice of love and affection in games, explaining the patterns and practice. The second section offers case studies from which designers can learn through example. Love and Electronic Affection: A Design Primer is a resource for exploring how digital relationships are offered and how to convey emotion and depth in a variety of virtual worlds. This book provides: • A catalog of existing digital and analog games for which love and affection are a primary or secondary focus. • A catalog of the uses of affection in games, to add depth and investment in both human-computer and player-to-player engagement. • Perspective on affection game analyses and design, using case studies that consider the relationship of culture and affection as portrayed in games from large scale studios to single author independent games. • Analysis and design recommendations for incorporating affection in games beyond romance, toward parental love, affection between friends, and other relationships. • Analysis of the moral and philosophical considerations for historical and planned development of love and affection in human–computer interaction. • An intersectionality informed set of scholarly perspectives from the Americas, Eurasia, and Oceania.
Article
The study aims to summarise and classify the existing research and to better understand the past, present, and the future state of the theory of customer experience. The main objectives of this study are to categorise and summarise the customer experience research, identify the extant theoretical perspectives that are used to conceptualise the customer experience, present a new conceptualisation and conceptual model of customer experience based on consumer culture theory and to highlight the emerging trends and gaps in the literature of customer experience. To achieve the stated objectives, an extensive literature review of existing customer experience research was carried out covering 49 journals. A total of 99 empirical and conceptual articles on customer experience from the year 1998 to 2019 was analysed based on different criteria. The findings of this study contribute to the knowledge by highlighting the role of customer attribution of meanings in defining their experiences and how such experiences can predict consumer behaviour.
Article
Full-text available
The article is devoted to the analysis of the influence of the psychology of human behavior on user experience. The evolution of the conceptual apparatus in the field of designing the user interface, taking into account the user experience. Based on recent research and publications, summarized psychological concepts that are fundamental in designing software products based on user experience. The process of cognitive load formation and its influence on user experience is described. Based on the existing literature, the process of forming the user experience is described, as well as the study of the theory of levels of the system of emotions. Also, the article discusses the topic of the effect of cognitive load on user experience, and provides examples of how the results of research on behavioral psychology improve the practice of developing user experience. The field of UX (user experience) studies is being studied in an area where design and experimental research are in conflict. Designing the UX has gone a long way from commercial websites, where convenience and efficiency have almost never been taken into account for optimized interfaces designed to interact with users. Previously, the goal was to have as much content as possible on the interface, now the field of user experience has been extensively explored and optimized to offer the user the right content, functionality at the right time, and also takes into account the psychological and emotional needs of users. In this article, we will discuss which psychological concepts are fundamental to the design of UX, how cognitive load is formed, and how it affects user experience. Since cognitive load plays an important role in the development of UX models, it is important to understand and take into account the laws that form it. In order to design an effective interface, one must study the psychology of a user who uses psychological concepts and theories. An analysis of user interaction with technology is aimed at developing and testing theories that explain or predict human behavior. Based on the existing literature, we describe how the experience of the user is formed, as well as investigate the theory of levels of the system of emotions.
Poster
Full-text available
RQ1: What characteristics do people attribute to conversational social agents? RQ2: Which characteristics predict the trustworthiness of conversational social agents?
Article
Full-text available
Roller coasters are acknowledged as icons of leisure with their towering structures forming an integral part of any theme or amusement parks’ skyline. As with any infrastructure, roller coasters come at a high cost, but inevitably also become outdated. By leveraging Virtual Reality (VR) technology, there is an opportunity to integrate new VR experience overlays with existing roller coasters, generating new interest in older ride infrastructure. While VR additions to roller coasters are a recent introduction (as of 2015), the adoption rate is high. Despite this, very little research has been conducted pertaining to the actual VR experience – and even less so from an end user’s perspective. This research examines existing literature (elements of best-practice VR experiences) and original data gathered from VR roller coaster audiences (pertaining to their reactions to current VR enhanced roller coaster experiences). From our findings we present a model, Burt’s VR Entertainment Primer, which identifies critical categories and supplemental elements to consider in order to develop a successful VR enhanced roller coaster experience overlay. The generic, user-centric nature of the model extends itself to the VR amusement and entertainment industries within a broader context, supporting the innovative application and assessment of VR in entertainment overall.
Article
This article argues in favor of representing the spatial distribution of information within and between documents, by surveying a broad variety of potential applications, including the entire document lifecycle, multiple sensory modalities, and a large spectrum of tasks and users. The theoretical explanations of this richness are a further facet of the article, and can be summarized as follows: (1) insights emerge from focusing on information structure, rather than information meaning; (2) spatializing information creates new information; (3) simplification increases the polyvalence of representation models; (4) introducing mystery in communication channels motivates discovery and diversifies insights; (5) approaching information design as a Gesamtkunstwerk multiplies the applications; (6) information is a manifestation of a link between structures and the actions these enable, while information design is the art and science of creating such links. The argument is developed around the concrete example of a document structure visualization, the Document Towers, which uses the metaphor of architectural models to represent documents.
ResearchGate has not been able to resolve any references for this publication.