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Guest Editorial: Special Issue on Power Electronics and Systems: Modeling, Analysis, Control, and Stability

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Abstract

Recent advances in power electronics have enabled rapid development of applications in power systems, including renewable energy generation, high-voltage dc (HVdc) transmission, flexible ac transmission system, energy storage, and microgrids. Power electronics are also the foundation for new mobile power system technologies, such as variable-frequency ac distribution for more-electric aircraft and medium-voltage dc grids for electric ships. While there has been a steady growth in the use of power electronics on the load side over the last three decades, the penetration of power electronics into the generation, transmission, and distribution areas has far more impacts on system operation, control, and stability. New control interactions and resonance problems have been encountered in renewable energy and HVdc systems, which caught many utility companies, power electronics manufacturers, and operators of wind or PV parks by surprise. New modeling, analysis, and control technologies as well as system stability theories have to be developed. Impedance-based and other frequency-domain techniques are emerging for stability analysis and control of ac power electronics systems. Real-time and hardware-in-the-loop simulation is also becoming common tools for the design and integration of HVdc, renewable energy integration, and microgrid systems.
IEEE JOURNAL OF EMERGING AND SELECTED TOPICS IN POWER ELECTRONICS, VOL. 2, NO. 4, DECEMBER 2017
713
Guest Editorial:
Special Issue on Power Electronics & Systems:
Modeling, Analysis, Control, and Stability
Recent advances in power electronics have enabled rapid
development of applications in power systems, including
renewable energy generation, high-voltage dc (HVDC)
transmission, flexible ac transmission system (FACTS), energy
storage, and microgrids. Power electronics are also the foundation
for new mobile power system technologies, such as variable-
frequency ac distribution for more-electric aircraft and medium-
voltage dc grids for electric ships. While there has been a steady
growth in the use of power electronics on the load side over the
last three decades, the penetration of power electronics into the
generation, transmission and distribution areas has far more
impacts on system operation, control, and stability. New control
interactions and resonance problems have been encountered in
renewable energy and HVDC systems, which caught many utility
companies, power electronics manufacturers and operators of
wind or PV parks by surprise. New modeling, analysis and control
technologies as well as system stability theories have to be
developed. Impedance-based and other frequency-domain
techniques are emerging for stability analysis and control of ac
power electronics systems. Real-time and hardware-in-the-loop
simulation is also becoming common tools for the design and
integration of HVDC, renewable energy integration, and
microgrid systems.
The Technical Committee on Power and Control Core
Technologies (TC1) of the IEEE Power Electronics Society
oversees the society’s technical activities in the area of modeling
and control. Power electronics application in power systems was
also a focused theme for the COMPEL 2016 Workshop held in
Trondheim. TC1 organized a special issue on “Modeling and
Control of Power Electronics for Renewable Energy and Power
Systems” in JESTPE in 2014 based on papers presented at
COMPEL 2013. Given the rapid development and expanding
interests in this area, a decision was made by TC1 at COMPEL
2016 to organize another special issue on related topics. We are
pleased to present to you this special issue.
The Call for Papers for this special issue was issued in September
2016. We received a total of 134 submissions, of which 28 have
been accepted and are published in this Special Issue. A number
of papers are still under revision/review, and will be published in
subsequent issues. The 28 accepted papers cover a variety of topics
related to the theme of the special issue:
1. Modeling for System Stability Analysis
- AC Systems: The 12 papers in the first section
discuss various small-signal methods and control
techniques for ac power system applications. The
techniques presented include sequence impedance,
dq-frame impedance, and eigenvalue methods.
Two papers on control of power converters to
emulate inertia are also included in this section.
- DC Systems: The 4 papers in this section apply
impedance- and eigenvalue-based methods to
different dc power systems, including shipboard
and systems with constant-power loads.
2. Converter Design, Modeling and Control
This section includes 12 papers and covers a variety of
topics: - Converters for Grid Application: Starting with
an overview paper on MMC, the 8 papers cover
converter topologies, modulation, modeling and
control of converters for HVDC and other grid-
connected applications.
- DC-DC Converter topologies and control: Three
papers discuss switched capacitor converters, a
quadratic boost converter with high voltage gain
and a three-input dc-dc converter for hybrid power
system applications with integrated battery storage.
This section also includes a paper on hardware-in-
the-loop simulation of dc-dc converters.
This Special Issue would not have been possible without
the diligence and hard work of the Guest Associate Editors
and all the reviewers. We especially thank them for their
support. The Guest Associate Editors for this Special Issue
are:
1) Mohamed Belkhayat, Huntington Ingalls, USA
2) Rolando Burgos, Virginia Tech, USA
3) Ying-Jiang Hafner, ABB, Sweden
4) Juri Jatskevich, University of British Columbia,
Canada
5) Paolo Mattavelli, University of Padova, Italy
6) Antonello Monti, RWTH Aachen University,
Germany
7) Jon Are Suul, Norwegian Uni. Sci. & Tech., Norway
8) Xiaorong Xie, Tsinghua University, China
9) Xiaoming Yuan, Huanzhong Uni. Sci. & Tech., China
10) Pericle Zanchetta, University of Nottingham, UK
11) Marco Liserre, Kiel University, Germany
12) Xiongfei Wang, Aalborg University, Denmark
13) Marina Sanz, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, Spain
Lastly, we would like to thank and acknowledge the stead-
fast support of the JESTPE administrative staff, Feng Bo, Sonal
Parikh, and especially thank the Editor-in-Chief, Dr. Don Tan,
for his strong, gracious support throughout the entire process.
714
MARTA MOLINAS, Guest Editor
Norwegian University of Science and Technology
Trondheim, 7491 Norway
JIAN SUN, Guest Editor
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute
Troy, NY 12180 USA
Marta Molinas (M’97) received the Diploma degree in electromechanical engineering from the
National University of Asunción, San Lorenzo, Paraguay, in 1992, the M.E. degree from the
University of the Ryukyus, Nishihara, Japan, in 1997, and the D.Eng. degree from the Tokyo
Institute of Technology, Tokyo, Japan, in 2000. She was a Guest Researcher with the University
of Padova, Padua, Italy, in 1998. From 2004 to 2007, she was a Post-Doctoral Researcher with the
Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Trondheim, Norway, where she was
Professor with the Department of Electric Power Engineering from 2008 to 2014. She is since
August 2014 a Professor with the Department of Engineering Cybernetics, NTNU. Her current
research interests include stability of power electronics systems, harmonics, instantaneous
frequency, and non-stationary signals from the human and the machine.
Dr. Molinas is a Member of the IEEE Power Electronics Society, where s he currently serves
as an Associate Editor of the
IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON POWER ELECTRONICS, the IEEE
POWER ELECTRONICS LETTERS, and the IEEE JOURNAL OF EMERGING AND SELECTED
TOPICS IN POWER ELECTRONICS. She is also a member of the IEEE Industrial Electronics
Society and Power Engineering Society.
Jian Sun (M’95SM’09-F’15) received the B.S. degree from Nanjing Institute of Aeronautics,
Nanjing, China, the M.S. degree from Beijing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics,
Beijing, China, and the Dr. Eng. (PhD) degree from University of Paderborn, Paderborn,
Germany, all in electrical engineering.
He was a Post-Doctoral Fellow with the School of Electrical and Computer Engineering,
Georgia Institute of Technology, from 1996 to 1997. He worked in the Advanced Technology
Center of Rockwell Collins, Inc., from 1997 to 2002, where he led research on advanced power
conversion for aerospace applications. In August 2002, he joined Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute
in Troy, NY where he is currently is a Professor and Director of the New York State Center for
Future Energy Systems (CFES). His research interests are in the general area of power electronics
and energy conversion, with a focus on modeling, control, as well as applications in aerospace
and renewable energy systems. He has published more than 170 journal and conference papers on
these subjects, and holds 9 US patents.
Dr. Sun is a Fellow of the IEEE. He served as the Editor-in-Chief of the IEEE Power Electronics
Letters from 2008 through January 2014. He also served as Chair of the IEEE Power Electronics Society’s Technical Committee
on Power and Control Core Technologies until December 2012 and became the Treasurer of PELS in January 2013. He was the
General Chair of IEEE COMPEL’06 Workshop and was involved in the organization of numerous other PELS conferences. He
received the PELS Modeling and Control Technical Achievements Award in 2013 and the R. David Middlebrook Achievement
Award in 2017 for contributions to averaged modeling and stability analysis of ac power electronics systems.

Supplementary resource (1)

Article
Switched mode power electronic converters with feedback control tend to behave like Constant Power Loads (CPLs). When a CPL interacts with a poorly damped input L-C filter, it amplifies any disturbance that occurs in the L-C circuit and the system becomes prone to instability. If the CPL is emulated as a positive resistance during any disturbance by manipulating the power that it consumes instantaneously, the instability can be avoided. In this manuscript, this has been achieved by a feedforward technique, in which the power consumed by the CPL is made to follow the trajectory of the input voltage during any disturbance similar to the power consumed by a resistive load. The proposed feedforward technique has only one variable, which can be determined by the input filter parameters and is independent of the type of the CPL. A case of a DC-DC converter based CPL is studied in this manuscript and the proposed technique is shown to create a virtual R-C impedance at the input of the CPL to offset the negative resistance behavior. The effectiveness of the proposed technique is showcased through detailed simulations and experimental studies on a 100W CPL prototype.
Conference Paper
Voltage balancing among the series connected wind turbines is one of the main technical challenges of offshore wind farms with DC series-parallel collection systems. Due to wake effect considerations, the power generated among the series connected wind turbines does not remain the same and the series connection causes the output voltages of the turbines to be distributed in proportion to their power output. Power curtailment is required in order to prevent the turbines being subjected to over-voltage and under-voltage conditions. In this paper, a voltage adjustment procedure is proposed to eliminate over-voltage and under-voltage of wind turbines. Based on the voltage adjustment procedure and the power generation model of wind turbines, the energy curtailment of a wind farm is analyzed with the consideration of wake effect due to series connection. A case study on several DC series-parallel collection configurations is presented to analyze the energy curtailment of wind farms using the voltage adjustment procedure.
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