Article

IMPACT OF WATER QUALITY PARAMETERS ON MONOSEX TILAPIA (Oreochromis niloticus) PRODUCTION UNDER POND CONDITION

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Abstract

The study was conducted at Reliance Aqua Farm in Rahmatpur, sadar upazila, Mymensingh during July to November 2012 to monosex tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) hatchery ponds with the view to evaluate it's water quality parameters (physico-chemical) for successful production. The samples were collected from Reliance Aqua Farm at Rahmatpur in sadar upazila under Mymensingh district of Bangladesh. The experiment was consisted of three treatments having with two replicates. Six ponds were used for the experiment. The area of each pond was 18 decimal and water depth 1.2 m. Each pond was stocked with tilapia at the density of 200 fish per decimal. There were three treatments which are treatment 1 (T 1) , treatment 2 (T 2) and treatment 3 (T 3) respectively. Artificial feed was applied at 20% body weight at 1 st month (up to 30 days) and reduced to 15% at 2 nd month, 10% at 3 rd month and 5% at the last month of the experiment. Water quality parameters such as water temperature, transparency, pH, dissolved oxygen, ammonia, nitrate and nitrite were measured at ten days interval. Parameters were measured by using thermometer, secchi disc, a portable multiparameter (HACH sension TM 156) meter and HACH device (DR-4000), a direct reading spectrophotometer. It was found that most of the water quality parameters were within suitable range among three treatments. There were no significant differences in temperature among three treatments. But in T 2, all the parameters were within desirable level. However, the highest DO was 7.29 mg/l found in T 2. The ammonia content was 0.36 to 1.325 mg/l in T 3 which was higher than T 1 and T 2. The higher ammonia content in T 3 might be due to the decomposition of uneaten feed. The nitrate concentration was observed with null value (0.0 mg/l) in all the cases. From the present study, it could be said that excess feed (uneaten) which produce ammonia was the main problem for tilapia farming. The problem should be addressed from the view point of research and for better production. Finally, it was observed that among three treatments the highest production was recorded in T 2 (40.19±513.53 kg/dec) compared to T 1 (33.69±26.08 kg/dec) and T 3 (36.14±189.56 kg/dec). The study revealed that the application of artificial feeding influenced the water quality parameters and production of fish in tilapia ponds.

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... These environmental factors usually govern feed consumption, growth and survival of tilapia fish. It is generally believed that the suitable range of water quality parameters ensures the better management of aquatic organisms as well as the aquatic environment [26]. Profitable Nile tilapia farming requires a regular management of water quality for maintaining a suitable environment and to maximize their production. ...
... Profitable Nile tilapia farming requires a regular management of water quality for maintaining a suitable environment and to maximize their production. In the current study, all the parameters of water quality monitored throughout the experimental period was within an acceptable range for optimum performance of Nile tilapia [26][27][28]. The results of proximate analysis of the diets are shown in Table 3. ...
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