Scenario planning in practice: Empirical philosophy, social foundation, paradox, and definitions

Thesis (PDF Available) · November 2017with 316 Reads
DOI: 10.13140/RG.2.2.16958.79687
Thesis for: PhD
Abstract
This dissertation attempts to deepen the intellectual traffic between Scenario Planning and Science and Technology Studies. It does this by taking on the lenses of empirical research of practice at the sites of the production of futures in facilitated scenario planning workshops and the certified knowledge produced about futures and scenarios in academic accounts and claims. Taking seriously the observation that scenario planning is the "laboratory" where futures are discovered and experimented upon, this dissertation leverages the insights developed in the so-called "Laboratory Studies" in STS to unravel the inner workings of the practices of scenario planning (Latour & Wollgar, 1979). The findings support the notions that the relations between science, laboratories, and scenarios are not trivial: The scientists and scenarists, with their instruments, methods, colleagues, and laboratories, carefully inscribe, negotiate, edit, and enact futures.
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