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Abstract

The author describes how, with primary goals to improve efficiency and lower prices, the United Kingdom took a phased-in approach to transitioning from a publicly run electricity system and a subsequent radical transformation to a competitive industry.

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... Electric power industry in many countries was transformed from the vertically integrated structure towards unbundling. Different aspects of these reforms were discussed on the cases of Great Britain (Lamoureux, 2001a(Lamoureux, , 2001bSurrey, 1996), USA (Barkovich & Hawk, 1996), Argentina and Chili (Pollitt, 2008a;Rudnick, 1996), and many other countries all over the world. Due to the reforms energy generation and distribution became competitive sectors, but the transmission is considered by most researchers as a natural monopoly despite the opposite position of some economists (DiLorenzo, 1996;Gordon, 1982). ...
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Transforming power: lessons from British restructuring
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Electricity Deregulation in the European Union
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