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Dance therapy and the public school: The development of social and emotional skills of high school students in Greece

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... De acuerdo a los artículos revisados, en la adolescencia las intervenciones con danza se centran en el desarrollo de habilidades sociales y emocionales, y con menor frecuencia centradas en la actividad física. Se han reportado beneficios en el área social y afectiva (Panagiotopoulou, 2018;N. Pereira & Marques-Pinto, 2017, 2018, en la calidad del sueño y el compromiso escolar (Sandberg et al., 2021), pero no se tiene evidencia de impactos sobre el nivel de actividad física (Jago et al., 2015). ...
... Se han reportado beneficios en el área social y afectiva (Panagiotopoulou, 2018;N. Pereira & Marques-Pinto, 2017, 2018, en la calidad del sueño y el compromiso escolar (Sandberg et al., 2021), pero no se tiene evidencia de impactos sobre el nivel de actividad física (Jago et al., 2015). ...
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La educación formal pretende la transmisión de conocimientos, valores y habilidades a los alumnos, en un contexto social e individual donde se pueden presentar problemas que afectan al proceso formativo, como el sedentarismo, el estrés, la falta de relaciones sociales y el compromiso por el estudio. Dado que la práctica regular de la danza mejora el bienestar general de las personas, el objetivo de esta revisión sistemática es conocer cómo se aplica esta actividad en el contexto educativo y que beneficios reporta. Se empleo la metodología PRISMA para realizar la revisión. Se consultaron las bases de datos Pub Med, Science Direct y Web of Science, empleando las palabras clave “dance, school, college, students”, entre los años 2012-2021- Después de aplicar los criterios de inclusión/exclusión, se seleccionaron 11 artículos para un análisis completo. La danza se aplica en forma de programas extracurriculares, con una o más sesiones de entre 60 min a 90 min por semana, para mejorar el bienestar físico, emocional y las relaciones sociales de los alumnos. Para el caso de los estudiantes universitarios, la práctica de la danza mejora los indicadores de estrés y depresión. La aplicación de la danza en el contexto educativo, puede contribuir con la formación integral de los alumnos en un entorno agradable, que puede maximizar la experiencia del aprendizaje.
... Group DMT with children has been found to be applicable with various conditions and in diverse situations, for example: children diagnosed with ASD [7,8], emotionally disturbed children [9], young children and adolescents in a psychiatric unit [2,10], youngsters with learning difficulties [1,11], children suffering from earthquake trauma [4], proactive work with adolescents [12], withdrawn adolescents [13], and refugee children [14]. ...
... In both groups, most of the children expressed difficulty in playful and symbolic emotional expression in various situations throughout the sessions, especially during the first and last sessions of the intervention [10], in situations where feelings of insecurity arose [8], and when faced with structured guidance [12]. ...
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The global COVID-19 outbreak has forced psychotherapists to find creative ways to continue treating their clients from afar. Dance movement therapy emphasizes the body-mind connection and offers a unique mode of emotional intervention for supporting mental processes. The present study is the first to examine the distinctive qualities of group dance movement therapy in the context of remote emotional intervention with young children. Fourteen preschool children participated in six DMT meetings. The data generated three themes: 1. play as a platform for transforming technical complexity into an expression of the inner world; 2. accessories and props as means of motivation for movement and imaginative play; 3. playfulness-inhibiting conditions in settings of remote therapy. The discussion examines the significance of bodily expressions in remote therapy for understanding the needs of children in times of crisis and for getting acquainted with feelings and sensations which do not lend themselves easily to verbal expression.
... In this regard, studies have been conducted in the field of rhythmic movements that help to identify these movements during the performance (3). Various studies have been conducted on the use of rhythmic movements in improving the health of people with dementia (7), Parkinson's disease (PD) (8), and even the development of social and emotional abilities (9). Capturing motor data is important, especially in sports; for example, using the algorithms and templates provided in this approach, it was possible to examine the skill level of professional athletes (10). ...
... Although capturing movements in various sports (10,22,23), rehabilitation studies (13,24), and physical disorders such as gait (25,26) is a widely used approach in today's world, music is also a broad, exciting, and highly valuable issue in areas such as dance therapy (7)(8)(9)27) and rehabilitation (24,28,29). ...
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Introduction: The modern human is on the cutting edge of information, communication, and technology, the turning point of which is to maintain the valuable traditional and cultural data inherited from the ancestors and hand down it to the descendants. This is fulfilled via stories, dances, and activities; negligence in this regard results in loss of cultural and location-based information. Materials and Methods: In this project, Perception Neuron device (a wearable system of nonoptoelectronics MoCap group) was utilized for capturing the data of the musical movements of the body. The captured data refers to the Azerbaijan region, known as Azeri Dance in the world. The study process contained three phases of possibility of identification, capturing and maintenance of musical movements on cultural-climatic backgrounds, endeavor at utilizing these musical movements of the body in creation of melodic and rhythmic patterns, and the game side of the study containing levels, game-based learning, player progress, and skill comparison among the players. The device was attached to a female performer with the body height of 165-170 cm according to software’s default body size with fewer flaws in data. The captured data was musical movements of the famous folk tune called Tərəkəmə (pronounces as /Tærækæmæ/). Results: The final product of the musical movements and Azeri dance was build and presented within a 3D room in Unity game engine. The player could move around and get closer to the performers in order to watch the dance and musical movements from different angles along with hearing the real music (perfomer danced with) syncing with the movements. Conclusion: This interdisciplinary study provided an interface for Azeri dance and rhythmic melodies using digital technology. The study can be extended to any culture from any part of the earth as well as for entertainment, medical, rehabilitation, and educational purposes.
... This was the time biomedicine was introduced and popularized among different care providers. Even though dance and music therapies were not included in the concept of biomedicine, it quickly became evident that Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) methods could be rather important for healthcare across the globe (Panagiotopoulou, 2018). Approximately a century ago, the ideological constructs of dance therapy were established, allowing for a much more rational, scientific approach to mental health. ...
... 1.2 | The current state of CATs in the U.S. school system While there has been a considerable amount of literature exploring school-based CAT approaches by non-American researchers (e.g., Adoni-Kroyanker et al., 2019;Capello, 2008;Carr & Wigram, 2009;Hautala, 2011;Karkou et al., 2009;Leigh et al., 2012;;McFerran & Rickson, 2014;Moula et al., 2020;Oldfield et al., 2011;Ottarsdottir, 2010;Panagiotopoulou, 2018;Regev et al., 2015;Snir et al., 2018), Oldfield et al., 2011) a U.S. perspective has been less concentrated and minimal in comparison. ...
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Recently there has been an expansion of the literature on creative arts therapy (CAT) interventions in the United States (U.S.) school system. However, findings across studies in the field have yet to be systematically investigated on a national level. The present review is an integrative systematic review of empirically evaluated CAT intervention studies in U.S. schools from the past decade. This synthesis seeks to advance CATs in schools' evidence base and increase research and practice throughout the U.S. Three online databases were searched alongside a manual review of relevant journals. Inclusion criteria required studies to feature a CAT modality, implementation in a U.S. K-12 school during the school day, and an empirical methodology. The systematic search yielded a total qualifying sample of six studies. General findings indicated that across studies, targeted improvement in psychosocial and behavioral domains was achieved, suggesting that CATs hold major promise due to their ecological responsiveness and versatility. Although the current scope of empirically evaluated CAT interventions in U.S. schools is minimal, findings suggest encouraging avenues for formulating a useful research trajectory and advancing practice. Further research recommendations for the promotion of CATs in schools are provided and situated within the school mental health literature.
... Yet, body-and arts-oriented therapies such as DMP offer additional opportunities to the client, such as mechanisms involving dynamic body awareness, regulation of psycho-physiological affect, and holistic integration of the individual as a feeling, moving and expressing organism. For high school students, specifically, Dance Therapy (that is, taking a cultural/anthropological approach) has contributed to the development of social and emotional skills (Panagiotopoulou, 2018), and Educational Dance activities for social and emotional learning loosely based on DMP, has led to increased self-management and relationship skills in middle-school students (Pereira & Marques-Pinto, 2017). ...
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This study explored eight secondary school participants’ subjective experiences of Dance Movement Psychotherapy [DMP], and how these perceptions relate to prior expectations and/or perceived outcomes from the therapy. How pupils and staff experience psychotherapeutic provision is of particular importance to engagement and process, with implications for therapeutic outcomes and – accordingly – the success and proliferation of such services within educational settings. A qualitative methodology based on Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis was utilised to explore these topics from the phenomenological lived experience of three pupil-clients and five staff involved. Experiences of ‘unexpected empowerment’ were most prominent along with related subthemes, and a differing notion of ‘External Contingency’ and its subthemes. Where clients did not expect to be provided with structured solutions or advice, their experiences of unexpected empowerment optimised the insight-based aspects of DMP. Alternatively, for a client anticipating a process resembling being led in a solution-oriented ‘package’, the client found it difficult to overcome dependency on – and seeking from – external influences as a resolution for subjective wellbeing. These results are discussed in the context of creative psychotherapies and wider social structures.
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Social and emotional competencies (SEC) are critical for success in school and life, as they include the ability to interact with others, regulate one’s emotions and behavior, solve problems, and communicate effectively. Research and practice show that dance experiences enhance social-emotional development, yet less is known about the mechanisms through which this occurs. To address this, 110 SEC and dance articles were reviewed to inform the development of a Theory of Change to explain how dance may promote SEC. Self-intimation, nonverbal expression and communication, embodied cognition and learning, synchrony, and a supportive learning environment emerged as the key components of dance practice that may facilitate SEC. Evidence for these components and research, practice, and policy implications are discussed.
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The effectiveness of group mother-child dance and movement therapy is presented. Eighty kindergarten (aged five to seven) children in the regular education system who were referred to therapy for various reasons took part. Participants were randomly divided into two groups: 40 children in group mother-child dance and movement therapy (group PCDMT) and 40 children in group dance and movement therapy without their mothers' participation (group DMT). The children completed the Child Self-Perception Questionnaire. The mothers completed the Child Behavior Assessment Questionnaire, the Mother’s Perception of the Mother-Child Relationship Questionnaire and the Mother’s Psychopathological Distress Questionnaire. The Therapy Assessment and Process Questionnaire was filled out by the therapists. The results show that both groups appear to have been effective in this study. The group PCDMT showed more improvement on some of the variables than the group DMT with the child alone.
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Choreography is an important and challenging educational objective in dance courses. However, most previous technology‐enhanced learning studies for dance education mainly focused on students’ dance skills, while the issue concerning the approaches to promoting students’ choreographic performance has generally been ignored. To address this issue, the present study developed a mobile technology‐assisted peer assessment approach based on social constructivism for use in a university general education dance routine choreography class. A total of 266 university students were divided into an experimental group and a control group. The experiment lasted for 15 weeks and involved two rounds of peer assessment. The results showed that mobile peer assessment could significantly enhance the innovative competence of dance routines and dance skills. In addition, according to the students’ feedback, the dance routine choreography class was conducive to improving social skills, innovative competence, and intrinsic motivation, while mobile peer assessment could assist students in understanding accurate evaluation criteria, reflecting on their own in a more objective way, and broadening the aspects of appreciating the work.
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Background: Dance is an embodied activity and, when applied therapeutically, can have several specific and unspecific health benefits. In this meta-analysis, we evaluated the effectiveness of dance movement therapy1(DMT) and dance interventions for psychological health outcomes. Research in this area grew considerably from 1.3 detected studies/year in 1996–2012 to 6.8 detected studies/year in 2012–2018. Method: We synthesized 41 controlled intervention studies (N = 2,374; from 01/2012 to 03/2018), 21 from DMT, and 20 from dance, investigating the outcome clusters of quality of life, clinical outcomes (with sub-analyses of depression and anxiety), interpersonal skills, cognitive skills, and (psycho-)motor skills. We included recent randomized controlled trials (RCTs) in areas such as depression, anxiety, schizophrenia, autism, elderly patients, oncology, neurology, chronic heart failure, and cardiovascular disease, including follow-up data in eight studies. Results: Analyses yielded a medium overall effect (d2 = 0.60), with high heterogeneity of results (I2 = 72.62%). Sorted by outcome clusters, the effects were medium to large (d = 0.53 to d = 0.85). All effects, except the one for (psycho-)motor skills, showed high inconsistency of results. Sensitivity analyses revealed that type of intervention (DMT or dance) was a significant moderator of results. In the DMT cluster, the overall medium effect was small, significant, and homogeneous/consistent (d = 0.30, p < 0.001, I2 = 3.47). In the dance intervention cluster, the overall medium effect was large, significant, yet heterogeneous/non-consistent (d = 0.81, p < 0.001, I2 = 77.96). Results suggest that DMT decreases depression and anxiety and increases quality of life and interpersonal and cognitive skills, whereas dance interventions increase (psycho-)motor skills. Larger effect sizes resulted from observational measures, possibly indicating bias. Follow-up data showed that on 22 weeks after the intervention, most effects remained stable or slightly increased. Discussion: Consistent effects of DMT coincide with findings from former meta-analyses. Most dance intervention studies came from preventive contexts and most DMT studies came from institutional healthcare contexts with more severely impaired clinical patients, where we found smaller effects, yet with higher clinical relevance. Methodological shortcomings of many included studies and heterogeneity of outcome measures limit results. Initial findings on long-term effects are promising.
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The purpose of the research is to enlighten the importance of the consideration of dance identity before the beginning of dance therapy sessions and to propose an example on how to explore dance identity in high school students. The research took place at a public school at Fokida, Greece. For the exploration of dance identity there were used questionnaires, interviews and practice. As a result, the students’ dance identity consisted of dances which constituted the local dance repertoire. Their dance identity was expanded during the twelve dance therapy meetings, but once again the students adjusted the new dances to the local dance structure and style. The interviews as well showed the students’ interest on Greek dances and particularly, on local tradition. It was obvious that at that time local dance was the proper to be used for an effective dance therapy.
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The book explores the disciplines of art therapy, music therapy, dramatherapy and dance movement therapy. It is the first book to offer a comprehensive mapping of the field of arts therapies including common and unique features of practice. It incorporates both qualitative and quantitative results presented in tables, diagrams and clinical vignettes. Written in a style which is relevant to readers from a variety of backgrounds Illustrated with clinical vignettes and practical examples to show how the therapies work in practice Tables and diagrams are used to present some simple descriptive statistics about the field Offers research-based descriptions of theory and practice that will be relevant to health professionals, academics and researchers interested in solid evidence about the character of arts therapies Addresses the needs of those studying for general courses in the practice of arts therapies and suitable as an introductory textbook for the specialists courses in specific therapies.
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Thesis (M.A.)--University of California, Los Angeles, 1987. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 74-100).
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This paper reports on work with groups in secondary schools in the UK using dance movement psychotherapy techniques. This is an innovative way of working in the educational setting, targeting students who find it hard to verbalise thoughts and feelings and who are unable to access help for themselves. These students often have emotional difficulties which manifest themselves in withdrawn, depressed, or unduly passive behaviour. Such young people, in avoiding attention, can sometimes be more at risk of low self esteem, social isolation, and poor body image, and their difficulties may lead to academic underachievement. The objective of this group project was that, using movement within a safe group environment, we might provide an early intervention through which the withdrawn young person could engage creatively in a process of development and growth. Such a category of students might be less likely than others to self refer for counselling. However because schools provide a ready-made universal constituency for preventative mental health work, there is the opportunity to proactively engage these young people in valuable therapeutic work. The project was planned for secondary school children in the UK National Curriculum Keystage 3 (11–13 years old) a vital age (and window of opportunity) for early intervention.
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The 1st volume, in a planned trilogy dealing with the prevention and control of mental disorders, focuses on the need for new knowledge and clinical understanding as they pertain to community dynamics. Program planning, staffing, and staff training are discussed from the standpoint of preventive psychiatry which "must containually take into account the multifactorial nature of the forces which provoke or ameliorate mental disorders." Programs to reduce the incidence of, the duration of, and the impairment which may result from mental disorders of all types in a community are touched upon. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
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Reports on 2 adult dance movement therapy group workshops the author conducted, one with western European (Zurich) and another with Taiwanese (Taipei) dance and mental health professionals. The author compares the emotionally expressive behavior and verbalized comments of the 20–25 participants in each of the workshops. This expressive behavior is seen as enactment of cultural self construal. Zurich participants showed little hesitation in expressing their emotions overtly, and behaved in ways congruent with an individualist type of self-construal, while the Taipei participants' behavior was consistent with a collectivist cultural self-construal, reflecting the view that expression of emotions is lacking in propriety. They also did not share aspects of their movement experience verbally as the Zurich participants did. The author concludes that creative arts therapists interested in conducting workshops demonstrating their western practices to groups holding divergent worldviews need to assume the role of mediator between these values and beliefs and their own. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
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This paper reviews the literature on curative factors in verbal group therapy and then develops a rationale for eight healing processes in group dance therapy: Synchrony, Expression, Rhythm, Vitalization, Integration, Cohesion, Education, Symbolism.These factors are discussed in relation to individual and group development and in terms of the movement correlates of each process. Also addressed is the interrelationship of these healing processes and implications for dance therapy research.
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Incl. app., bibliographical references, index, answers pp; 593-619
Article
The Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ) is designed to measure psychological adjustment in children and adolescents. Psychometric evaluations of the instrument have shown satisfactory convergent and discriminant validity, while factor analysis studies have shown mixed results across countries. In the present study, the construct validity of the five-factor SDQ is evaluated in a large community sample of Norwegian pre-, early, and late adolescents. The sample consisted of 26,269 children and adolescents (10-19 years) with valid answers on all 25 items of the SDQ self-report. Complete parent/proxy data of respective pre-adolescent children was available for 6,645 cases. A Lisrel approach to Confirmatory Factor Analysis (CFA) was used to evaluate the five-factor model and the presence of a positive construal factor. In the sample of pre-adolescents and their parents/proxies, convergent and discriminant validity was evaluated by a CFA approach to multitrait-multimethods (MTMM). Fit statistics for the hypothesized five-factor model were satisfactory, but introducing correlated error terms for some of the items led to significant model improvement in all age groups. All factor loadings were higher than .30, except for item 11 (good friend). The loadings differed across age groups and differed markedly between the parent/proxy and self-report measures. The MTMM showed that the source of ratings made a difference on the validity of all subscale ratings, with self-reports discriminating more on ratings of emotional and peer problems, and parents/proxies discriminating more on hyperactivity symptoms. A positive construal factor was identified but had a modest effect compared with the original five traits. Results suggested an unclear construct and meaning of the Prosocial behaviour subscale. The results of the present study indicated support for the proposed five-factor structure of the SDQ (Goodman, 2001) across a wide age range (10-19years), including older adolescents and different informants. However, some improvements should be considered to improve internal reliability and conceptual clarity.
Article
Programs to reduce or prevent juvenile delinquency have been generally unsuccessful. Apparently the risk factors that make a child prone to delinquency are based in too many systems--including the individual, the family, and community networks--to make isolated treatment methods effective. Surprisingly, longitudinal studies of some early childhood intervention programs suggest they may help to reduce future delinquency. These programs take an ecological approach to enhancing child development by attempting to promote overall social competence in the many systems impacting on children. Not engaging in criminal acts is one indicator of competence that is related to others, such as being successful in school and in personal relationships. Evaluators must gather more data to confirm this unanticipated benefit of comprehensive interventions.
Article
In an epidemiological longitudinal study, 356 out of 399 8-yr old children were re-examined at age 13. Prevalence rates for psychiatric disorders of about 16% remained constant during adolescence. The course of emotional disorders proved very promising, while that of conduct disorders was extremely unfavorable. Remission of psychiatric disorders was also influenced by an improved psychosocial environment within the family. Development of disorders in initially healthy children was related to prior learning disabilities and stressful life events. More effective approaches in the treatment of conduct disorders as well as early detection of detrimental familial conditions and learning disabilities are called for.
Article
A novel behavioural screening questionnaire, the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ), was administered along with Rutter questionnaires to parents and teachers of 403 children drawn from dental and psychiatric clinics. Scores derived from the SDQ and Rutter questionnaires were highly correlated; parent-teacher correlations for the two sets of measures were comparable or favoured the SDQ. The two sets of measures did not differ in their ability to discriminate between psychiatric and dental clinic attenders. These preliminary findings suggest that the SDQ functions as well as the Rutter questionnaires while offering the following additional advantages: a focus on strengths as well as difficulties; better coverage of inattention, peer relationships, and prosocial behaviour; a shorter format; and a single form suitable for both parents and teachers, perhaps thereby increasing parent-teacher correlations.
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