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Abstract

The main scope of the paper is the implementation of future scenarios in the Lower Danube basin, supporting the development of River Basin Management Plans and future environmental policies. The 800 000 km² Danube River Basin extends across 19 countries, of which 14 are contracting parties of the ICPDR. The Lower Danube is occupied mostly by Romania, including the Danube Delta. The Danube Delta hydrological complex covers 5800 km² comprising over 300 lakes, three main branches and a vast network of channels. Changes impacting significant ecosystem services such as recreation, fishing, flows, ecotourism, flood regulation, navigation and reed/wood resources have to be evaluated and the quantification of those elements must be performed in order to incorporate them into the modelling process.

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