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Umweltverträgliche Nagetier-Bekämpfung in der Landwirtschaft: Vergleichende Umweltbewertung für Rodentizide, Bewertung nicht-chemischer Alternativen / Ecologically benign rodent management in agriculture: comparative assessment of rodenticide use and alternatives

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Kurzbeschreibung (Abstract below) – Im Projekt ‚Umweltverträgliche Nagetier-Bekämpfung in der Landwirtschaft: Vergleichende Umweltbewertung für Rodentizide, Bewertung nicht-chemischer Alternativen‘ (FKZ 3713 67 405 UBA) wurden Methoden zur Nagetierbekämpfung in der Landwirtschaft recherchiert, aufbereitet, zusammengefasst und kommuniziert. Ziel des Vorhabens war, den Einsatz von Rodentiziden durch die Anwendung nicht-chemischer Verfahren zu minimieren, um langfristig, dort wo möglich, ganz auf Rodentizide zu verzichten. Dazu wurden der aktuelle Wissensstand bezüglich der Anwendung alternativer Verfahren und Methoden zur Eindämmung von Nagetierschäden erfasst. Diese Verfahren wurden hinsichtlich Praktikabilität, Wirksamkeit und Umweltverträglichkeit bewertet, um daraus Praxisempfehlungen abzuleiten und den Anwendern verfügbar zu machen. Im ersten Schritt wurden biologisch-ökologische Profile der Haupt-Schadnagerarten im Landwirtschaftssektor erstellt sowie eine Literaturstudie zu möglichen Präventionsmaßnahmen und nicht-chemischen Bekämpfungsmethoden durchgeführt. Landwirte und Landesbehörden wurden hinsichtlich ihrer Erfahrung bei der chemischen und nicht-chemischen Bekämpfung von Schadnagern in der Praxis befragt. Im Anschluss erfolgte auf Grundlage dieser Daten die Entwicklung eines Bewertungskonzeptes für die verschiedenen chemischen und nicht-chemischen Bekämpfungsmethoden hinsichtlich Wirksamkeit, Umweltverträglichkeit, Praktikabilität und Kosten. Dieses Bewertungskonzept wurde auf die gesammelten Daten angewandt und gleichzeitig Wissenslücken und Forschungsbedarf aufgedeckt. In einem Workshop für die Anwender und Vertreter der entsprechenden Behörden und Verbände fand die Präsentation der Ergebnisse statt. Geeignete alternative Verfahren für eine umweltverträgliche integrierte Bekämpfung von Schadnagern und Handlungsempfehlungen für die Anwender wurden vorgestellt._________________________________________________ Abstract – In this project (‚Ecologically benign rodent management in agriculture: comparative assessment of rodenticide use and alternatives’ grant # 371367405), methods for field rodent management were collated, reviewed, summarized, and communicated. The project was intended to aid minimizing the use of rodenticidal products in plant protection and, in the long-term, to manage pest rodents where possible without rodenticides in the future. An overview and assessment of the present use and knowledge about alternative pest rodent management was developed to de-rive and present suitable methods to users. In the first step, overviews of the biology and ecology of the main pest rodents were prepared and preventive and non-chemical management methods already published were surveyed. Based on these data, a concept was developed to evaluate diverse chemical and non-chemical management methods. This included the consideration of efficiency, environmental safety, feasibility, and cost. The evaluation concept was applied to the recorded data. Considerable knowledge gaps and the need for further research were identified. Results were presented in a work-shop to end users such as farmers and plant protection extension staff to disseminate alternative methods available for an ecologically benign rodent management and to give advice to end users._________________________________________ Link to UBA library: http://webde/gruppen/bibliothek/OnlineReports/EF000906.pdf
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